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Help Cleaning Saw Top

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Forum topic by SSotolongo posted 05-24-2019 04:03 PM 331 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SSotolongo

51 posts in 90 days


05-24-2019 04:03 PM

So I was able to get the rust off the table saw top, but as you can see below the top looks like that. I had to go with lower grit sand paper than I wanted to get the rust off and I plan to go higher to polish it out. It’s pretty smooth as it is. I want to know if there is anything that can help me get these stains out or is this just one of the chemical processes with metal and I’m stuck with them? It’s more for aesthetic reasons than anything. If I can’t remove them, I can live with it, as long as the wood will move smoothly across the top. Thank you.


9 replies so far

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

605 posts in 304 days


#1 posted 05-24-2019 06:06 PM

If it’s pitted on the tabletop, but smooth to slide the boards across I probably wouldn’t be worried. Otherwise you could repeat the cleaning process and sand with a high grit sand paper, sanding the whole top evenly. till you get satisfied results. If it was badly rusted with pitting started, I’d say you did a decent job. Is this the picture after you rubbed the rust remover, wiped off with rubbing alcohol and put a silicone free protective spray layer over the tabletop.

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SSotolongo

51 posts in 90 days


#2 posted 05-24-2019 06:19 PM



If it s pitted on the tabletop, but smooth to slide the boards across I probably wouldn t be worried. Otherwise you could repeat the cleaning process and sand with a high grit sand paper, sanding the whole top evenly. till you get satisfied results. If it was badly rusted with pitting started, I d say you did a decent job. Is this the picture after you rubbed the rust remover, wiped off with rubbing alcohol and put a silicone free protective spray layer over the tabletop.

- WoodenDreams

It’s after the sanding and then I wiped it down with some mineral spirits to clean off all the dust. What do you recommend for a good rust remover? I tried just general stuff like WD-40 and Mineral spirits and a scotch pad.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

696 posts in 1496 days


#3 posted 05-24-2019 06:39 PM

Once you are finished with the sanding and cleaning, give it a good coat of paste wax (Johnson’s – available at the grocery store) works well. Maintain the wax coat periodically and you won’t have any rust problems. Also, your wood will slide easily. Don’t worry too much about the looks of it.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2314 posts in 2383 days


#4 posted 05-24-2019 08:02 PM

If you still have rust down in the pits, there are some rust removers at the bbs when used with a brush should do it. I know Lowes has Loctite rust converter which is sprayed on and I believe converts it to black oxide, which would be my choice. May need to lightly sand again using the converter as it may leave a film, which is fine in the pitts but not on the flat surface. Paste wax it 2-3 coats and should be ready.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7388 posts in 2592 days


#5 posted 05-24-2019 08:46 PM

Kind of pointless now that you have gone the sandpaper route, but generally, all you need to do is hit it with a razor blade to get 90% of the gunk off. After that, a scotch brite pad and a little solvent will get you the rest of the way. Put the pad under a vibrating sander to make it even easier.

That pile of rust shown in the top right photo was from a very small area of the table just to the left of the razor. You can kind of see where, and will be amazed at how much will come up initially.

As for the stains… cast iron will stain… you can’t help it. But you can reduce the staining a bit by using some Oxalic acid (eg: Barkeepers friend). I’d stay away from the phosphoric acid based rust removers/converters as they will leave a dark black film (black oxide) as OSU55 mentioned.

After that, just give it a good coating of paste wax and you are good to go.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12810 posts in 2774 days


#6 posted 05-24-2019 10:18 PM

Even better, wipe on a coat of polyurethane which will last a lot longer than wax or oil.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

574 posts in 596 days


#7 posted 05-25-2019 12:20 AM

i use the top coat products have since i bought the uni saw in the late 80s , top is excellent shape, material glides like on bearings, just give it a bath when it seems to drag some.
best of luck
Rj

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2866 posts in 968 days


#8 posted 05-25-2019 01:55 AM

The look of a top does nothing to make the tool work, it’s about the ability to wax it, and slide material over it smoothly. No hang ups.

If however the look is important to you, keep doing repeated passes of what you are doing now, while increasing the grit of the paper you are working with. Polishing it more or less.

That dull gray coloration is often from the use of products with either phosphoric or hydrochloric acid. Sometimes these appear to speed up the cleaning of rust. I think they actually prolong the work, because they so discolor the top. I am in the camp that finds that ugly, and will toil to remove it.

WD40 and increasing grits will clean it up. Just make sure you keep moving. If you saw at it in one place, you can dish your top. Very possible for those who don’t want to use their arm, but default to a ROS, belt sander, etc etc.

-- Think safe, be safe

View SSotolongo's profile

SSotolongo

51 posts in 90 days


#9 posted 05-25-2019 01:07 PM



Kind of pointless now that you have gone the sandpaper route, but generally, all you need to do is hit it with a razor blade to get 90% of the gunk off. After that, a scotch brite pad and a little solvent will get you the rest of the way. Put the pad under a vibrating sander to make it even easier.

That pile of rust shown in the top right photo was from a very small area of the table just to the left of the razor. You can kind of see where, and will be amazed at how much will come up initially.

As for the stains… cast iron will stain… you can t help it. But you can reduce the staining a bit by using some Oxalic acid (eg: Barkeepers friend). I d stay away from the phosphoric acid based rust removers/converters as they will leave a dark black film (black oxide) as OSU55 mentioned.

After that, just give it a good coating of paste wax and you are good to go.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

My blade disappeared and reappeared only after the I was done. Just my luck. I’ll try it at least once and see if anything else comes up and then I’ll seal it. Thanks for the advice.

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