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Forum topic by jcleary47 posted 05-23-2019 07:29 PM 815 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jcleary47

2 posts in 28 days


05-23-2019 07:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw question

Came across this forum while trying to hunt down as much information as possible to help myself make the right decision. Looks like an excellent community! Apologies for raising a question that I’m sure everyone has seen come up 1000 times.

I’m torn between two routes when it comes to purchasing a table saw. I’m looking at either the Grizzly G0771Z – 10” 2 HP 120V Hybrid Table Saw or the Rigid R4512 10” Table Saw.

I suppose what I’ve been unable to deduce is the general consensus on whether spending the extra money on something like the Grizzly is worth it.

I’m not woodworking to generate income or profit – I just really really enjoy building something versus buying when I can – and I want to make sure I’m investing in tools I will be able to use for years to come without having to tinker/tweak too often, and more importantly not limiting myself when it comes to potential projects. I don’t want to put myself in a position where I’m trying to save a few hundred bucks, and end up paying the price in time/effort by having to return something or fiddle with something out of the box because it’s so out of whack.

I’ve read so many forum posts on the subject and it seems like communities are equally torn, but felt like I could benefit from a fresh discussion on the topic to maybe help ease my mind in my decision making process.

If it helps, the types of things I’ve been building for friends, family and myself are usually things like large planting/flower containers, outdoor chairs/benches, toddler beds, toy chests, etc.


20 replies so far

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PPK

1404 posts in 1199 days


#1 posted 05-23-2019 07:37 PM

Welcome to the community!
You’ll get lots of different opinions :)
I personally own a Grizzly, and have owned and used lots of different brands over the years. The grizzly’s are a very good product for the price. I personally would steer clear of the Rigid. It just won’t last the way the Grizzly will, as well as accuracy, etc. won’t be the same. I see the tablesaw as the central/most important tool in my shop, so no skimping there. Others see differently I’m sure.

-- Pete

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HackFabrication

134 posts in 101 days


#2 posted 05-23-2019 07:45 PM


I see the tablesaw as the central/most important tool in my shop, so no skimping there. Others see differently I m sure.
- PPK

I don’t. The table saw is the anchor for any homeowner’s shop once you get beyond hand power tools. It was the first major stationary tool I bought 30+ years ago when I reached the limitations of hand held power tools. And I agree, the Grizzly has a lot of ‘bang for the buck’.


I m not woodworking to generate income or profit – I just really really enjoy building something versus buying when I can – and I want to make sure I m investing in tools I will be able to use for years to come without having to tinker/tweak too often, and more importantly not limiting myself when it comes to potential projects. I don t want to put myself in a position where I m trying to save a few hundred bucks, and end up paying the price in time/effort by having to return something or fiddle with something out of the box because it s so out of whack.

- jcleary47


Honestly, for a homeowner, ‘let’s just build it’ type of person, you can’t go wrong with a contractor’s style saw. Yeah, it’s not going to have all the benefits of a quality cabinet saw. That, you have to accept from the get go. But there are countless people, building great looking ‘stuff’, with a basic contractor saw.

You really also should consider dust collection. Where is your ‘shop’? If it’s in the basement (like mine is), you’re going to make a lot of dust. Momma isn’t going to be happy. Contractor saws aren’t basically designed with dust collection in mind. Cabinet style saws do a better job at that. But neither are operating room clean.

I’m a tool ‘junkie’, so if I had deep pockets, I’d have the ‘best of the best’. But I don’t. And there is a lot of truth to the saying: ‘It’s not the tool, it’s the user’.

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

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Rayne

1207 posts in 1929 days


#3 posted 05-23-2019 08:09 PM

I’d go with Grizzly just for the fact that it’s a Hybrid. The Ridgid is a good starter saw, but you’re going to wish you had a far more stable and robust table saw in the future. I had the Delta equivalent but decided to upgrade and have not regretted it one bit.

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Andybb

1920 posts in 993 days


#4 posted 05-23-2019 08:17 PM

I have that Grizzly. Deadly accurate and smooth running. Love the saw, but then again I updated from a Bosch 4000 series contractor saw. The hybrid will not give you that same level of dust collection as a full fledged cabinet saw but it won’t cost near as much either.

That being said, are you looking to buy a new saw or a used one? I’d suggest the used route as you’re likely to get more saw for the same money. You can usually find a nice used Delta or Grizzly in the $400-$600 range. Here's an example. I paid $475 for my Grizzly. You will find enough endless reviews and table saw discussions here to make your head spin.

As someone else said, folks make nicer stuff than I can just using a contractors saw but a nice sturdy TS is a great addition to any shop.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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WoodenDreams

605 posts in 300 days


#5 posted 05-23-2019 09:57 PM

Two years ago I upgraded my Dewalt contractors saw to a Grizzly G0771Z. A big difference. I built a 4’x4’ workbench that doubles as a outfeed table for the saw. I’m very pleased with the Grizzly G0771Z. This is not a professional high production table saw, but for a hobbyist or a small business, this is a good Table saw. I also like the fact it’s on a cabinet with dust collection. Verses a stand for the saw. I looked up the Rigid 4512 to compare, and the rigid table top extensions are sheet metal and not cast iron. I watched the Rigid 4512 assembly video, and the table top extensions bent down every time he pressed down on the wings. The Grizzly G0771Z extension wings are cast, not thin sheet metal. a big difference in tabletop strength. After using my Grizzly for two years, I wouldn’t settle for any less than the G0771Z specifications.

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Ripper70

1275 posts in 1298 days


#6 posted 05-23-2019 10:20 PM

Based on your post, I’d say go with the Grizzly. You’ll be glad you have the capabilities that the saw offers should your wood working journey take you to more complex or bigger projects.

However, as Andybb mentioned above, a good deal can be had by scouring craigslist for a used machine. Your location will have allot to do with the availability and price, though. In my neck of the New York woods, the saw he linked to in his post would probably sell for closer to $1,000 bucks. And, if it’s a real screaming deal, it’ll be sold to someone else before you could back the car out of the driveway. Additionally, you’ll need 220v power source to run a saw with those specs. But, half the fun is in the hunt.

Welcome aboard and good luck.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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TungOil

1255 posts in 884 days


#7 posted 05-23-2019 11:58 PM

Given the choice of the two and your mix of projects, I’d go with the grizzly. If you decide to try the CL route, you might get lucky and pick up a used sawstop for the extra safety.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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CaptainKlutz

1360 posts in 1883 days


#8 posted 05-24-2019 06:43 AM

My 2 cents:
Most people would suggest to get the Grizzly Hybrid over the Ridgid, and this is not bad decision. It has more power, and better fence. If they are both affordable in your budget, then go big and be happy!
BUT:
There is one key difference between them that create hidden challenge: 2HP .vs. 1.5HP
While both are 120V machines, the Grizzly 2HP requires a 20A dedicated circuit .vs 1.5HP able to use any regular 15A/20A circuit. Attempting to use 2HP motor on 15A circuit will result in frustration due occasional breaker tripping during start up. So if you don’t have 20A breakers in panel to the outlets in work shop, and/or are unable to prevent other tools from using the 20A ‘saw’ circuit at same time; you probably want to consider the saw with smaller 1.5HP motor?
Sorry if this changes your decision? Just hoping to avoid any surprises later. :)
If you have 20A power, then ignore this and go big.

One more comment:
If I were to buy a new contractor type saw, would consider the Delta 35-725 instead of Ridgid. It has fence similar to the Grizzly, and offers the smaller 1.5HP motor that works in any shop. The Ridgid 4512 has been around a long time, and you can no longer walk into HD and get one. Support is only direct via Ridgid. The Delta has new home shop T3 version of classic Biesemeyer style fence, and is sold by both HD and Lowes. Lowes offers several discounts to help reduce cost? There are several favorable reviews on this saw here on LJ.

PS – If you haven’t read this blog about table saws, might find it interesting.
https://www.lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/32154

PPS – +1 look for used Cabinet saw. They can be had for same price as new Delta contractor saw.
Plus there is zero difference in foot print for TS in shop between Contractor and Cabinet saw. If you have 220V in shop, will never regret having a 3HP cabinet saw.

Welcome to LJ forums!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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ChefHDAN

1401 posts in 3239 days


#9 posted 05-24-2019 10:47 AM

To add on to the excellent advice from the Cap’n, if you’re looking to get it NOW and don’t want to play the used market, it is mostly about what you see yourself doing and what you’re looking at in budget. My grandfather and father both raised me to buy the best tools I can for the money, and not be looking to replace them. My first TS was a Ridgid TS3612 that I bought as a floor model for a very good price, and I’m still running it today. I’m a hobbyist and really have not had a situation where there has been something my contractor saw can’t do, but I realize a bigger saw would make some of those things easier/simpler. As you consider the sage advice above keep in mind that there are many other tools that round out a shop when you want to start building furniture. I have a good sawyer and work from rough stock, I would be spending nearly twice the $$$ for stock if not for having a jointer and planer, which both also make a dust collector necessary.

I figure, if I’m ever in a position to retire in some fashion and we’re able to find that piece of property where I can get out of a 2 car garage with some dedicated space to have my shop, I’ll likely look to upgrade the saw, but for now with what I have time for and space for I’m good. For starting out, I’d strongly advise patience and look at Craig’s list daily, or use one of the apps that will give you search alerts, in general most tools outside of commercial use are well cared for and sell at or near 50% of retail, you’ll be amazed at how fast all of the other little things you’re going to need will eat up your $$$, and then there are the build materials costs… so every penny you can pinch you can save for Festool dreams…

Welcome to the Forum & good luck

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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jcleary47

2 posts in 28 days


#10 posted 05-24-2019 04:45 PM

Wow thank you so much for the replies. Lots of great, informative information and suggestions here.

I think I’m going to go with the Grizzly – I think the potential benefits I’d see immediately and in the future make it a solid choice for me. I’ve been getting by without a table saw since my last hand-me-down bit the dust a few years back, but I’ve got some larger projects I’ve been dying to get started and I think something solid like this could be a great addition based on everything I’ve read and what I’m hearing here.

I added a bunch of 20a circuits and while I was in there ran a 220v line in anticipation of my table saw acquisition at some point so I should be good to go there.

I will definitely keep my eyes out on Craigslist over the next few weeks in case but I’m prepared to go retail with the budget I’ve set aside.

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gmaffPappy

63 posts in 2420 days


#11 posted 05-24-2019 06:09 PM

I’m building out my workshop also and have faced similar dilemmas. Put serious consideration to Dust Collection. IT WILL GET EVERYWHERE. It knows no bounds. You’ll find it tracked into the house and even dusting the top of a bookshelf you’d think it would never get to. I work in my garage. Even with dust collection, it’s an invasive pest.

I have a SawStop 3 HP Cabinet Saw. I love it, and would never go with saw that wasn’t and enclosed cabinet. Having a heavy, solid, and level table top is critical for a TON of reasons. They: reduce the transfer of vibration to the work – drastically cut down on the saw marks on your product, help you cut accurate angles, provide a level platform to build on (before you build the Dream Workbench)....etc. As others have said, the TS is really the “Center Piece” of your shop. Get the biggest you can afford, and you’ll be happier with the results, especially with the Dust Collection when compared with a Hybrid and Contractor saws.

MHO: I’d rather have a bigger used basic Cabinet Table Saw than a nice, new, shiny Contractor Saw with all the options possible, any day.

-- If it's easy to do, you haven't spent enough time over engineering it.

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therealSteveN

2826 posts in 963 days


#12 posted 05-25-2019 02:03 AM



Welcome to the community!
You ll get lots of different opinions :)
I personally own a Grizzly, and have owned and used lots of different brands over the years. The grizzly s are a very good product for the price. I personally would steer clear of the Rigid. It just won t last the way the Grizzly will, as well as accuracy, etc. won t be the same. I see the tablesaw as the central/most important tool in my shop, so no skimping there. Others see differently I m sure.

- PPK

Wow reading this I feel like I wrote it. +1

-- Think safe, be safe

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2826 posts in 963 days


#13 posted 05-25-2019 02:08 AM


Welcome to the community!
You ll get lots of different opinions :)
I personally own a Grizzly, and have owned and used lots of different brands over the years. The grizzly s are a very good product for the price. I personally would steer clear of the Rigid. It just won t last the way the Grizzly will, as well as accuracy, etc. won t be the same. I see the tablesaw as the central/most important tool in my shop, so no skimping there. Others see differently I m sure.

- PPK

Wow reading this I feel like I wrote it. +1

Capn’s mention of available electrical is spot on. That Hybrid will cause you a lot of grief on 110, even if it’s on a 20amp circuit. It’s a 220 kinda set up. Not that 220 is hard to do, but it would be a “to do” if you went there.
- therealSteveN


-- Think safe, be safe

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WoodenDreams

605 posts in 300 days


#14 posted 05-25-2019 06:42 AM

The Grizzly G0771Z 120v/240v I have, I left it wired as 120v, It’s the way I recieved it. It’s on a 20amp circuit. The Grizzly G1531 110v/220v that I have, I received it wired as 220v. I rewired it to 110v. It’s also on a 20amp circuit. I bought both of them at the same time two years ago, and have no power issues.

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Joe8857

5 posts in 26 days


#15 posted 05-25-2019 07:03 AM

What would everyone recommend to a beginner with a $500 budget for a table saw?
Going to be a garage workshop.

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