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How to make those cuts for compound angled joinery on the TS

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Forum topic by therealSteveN posted 05-20-2019 08:18 PM 834 views 3 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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therealSteveN

2797 posts in 960 days


05-20-2019 08:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: joining compound angled joinery joinery on the ts

I saw this in my e-mail today

This isn’t rocket science, but it is a lot more difficult trying to get this from something written, than seeing it done on video.

Tell me what you think?

-- Think safe, be safe


14 replies so far

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Jerry

3175 posts in 2034 days


#1 posted 05-20-2019 08:22 PM

Well, I think it’s brilliant! Stop blocks and jigs always yield consistent results. Since I was getting ready to make some serving trays anyway, I really appreciate the serendipitous timing of this post. Thanks for sharing.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

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SMP

1020 posts in 292 days


#2 posted 05-20-2019 08:31 PM

Wow, that seems so obvious after watching it. I recently avoided making a serving tray with compound angles because I was hesitant to try, and waste a bunch of walnut in the process. I ended up making it all 90 degrees. Will have to make another trying this out, thanks!

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PaulDoug

1920 posts in 2090 days


#3 posted 05-20-2019 08:40 PM

Outstanding video. Thanks for sharing.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

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Aj2

2263 posts in 2184 days


#4 posted 05-20-2019 08:40 PM

Ha the hard part is getting all four corners to meet with some kinda jointery . Then glue the whole thing up without gaps in the corners.
It’s far from a success making one corner.
I use my Bosch glide for compound miters .
Good Luck with a tablesaw

-- Aj

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Woodknack

12797 posts in 2766 days


#5 posted 05-20-2019 09:28 PM

Best thing about this method is it removes accuracy from the equation which simplifies the process. I’m tempted to go make a small tray (don’t need a serving tray) just to practice and cement it in my brain.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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MSquared

518 posts in 300 days


#6 posted 05-20-2019 10:31 PM

Excellent resource! I used to design consoles for video editing rooms and TV control rooms (think Star Trek bridge) When I’d finished all my drafting and dimensions, I’d take the blueprint down to the carpentry shop and lay it out for the cabinet makers. Invariably, they’d have a fit! Mainly, because I had a deadline and they had other projects in the works already, and what I brought to them was ‘friggin’ trigonometry’! A lot of wood scraps flew in my direction! :)
To the point; Tony, the lead man, immediately set about figuring jigs for the job. “it might take a day or so for the jigs, don’t bother me!” he’d say. Imagine what’s shown in that video with easily about 10 more custom compound angle/miter joints. They did it! Magicians!! And yes, I brought lunch … frequently.

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

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therealSteveN

2797 posts in 960 days


#7 posted 05-21-2019 06:22 AM

If it helps anyone, it’s a win. Thanks guys

-- Think safe, be safe

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CarlosInTheSticks

285 posts in 758 days


#8 posted 05-23-2019 01:54 AM

For those interested in jigs here is a link to a couple of jigs from R.J. De Cristoforo for compound TS jigs.

https://hobbyworkshopprojects.blogspot.com/2019/04/compound-angles-on-table-saw.html

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Aj2

2263 posts in 2184 days


#9 posted 05-23-2019 02:04 AM



If it helps anyone, it s a win. Thanks guys

- therealSteveN

Did you make a tray with four corners?

-- Aj

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therealSteveN

2797 posts in 960 days


#10 posted 05-24-2019 02:55 AM


For those interested in jigs here is a link to a couple of jigs from R.J. De Cristoforo for compound TS jigs.

https://hobbyworkshopprojects.blogspot.com/2019/04/compound-angles-on-table-saw.html

- Carlos510

Carlos, it was RJ’s writing I was saying was more difficult to comprehend than seeing it on video. I first saw that around 1968 IIRC. Prior to most guys did them on a RAS, which almost everyone had until Miter saws became the thing to have.

-- Think safe, be safe

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CarlosInTheSticks

285 posts in 758 days


#11 posted 05-24-2019 03:12 AM

I guess everyone has there preferred method for consuming instructive information. For me the written word with illustrations is my preferred method. I guess I’m an oldy from another era, but I find videos are more entertaining than instructive. I have most of RJ’s books on my shelves and many magazine articles. RJ and the Capotostos were the bread and butter for many of the popular DIY magazines back in the 60’s,70’s, and 80’s.

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therealSteveN

2797 posts in 960 days


#12 posted 05-24-2019 03:49 AM



Ha the hard part is getting all four corners to meet with some kinda jointery . Then glue the whole thing up without gaps in the corners.
It’s far from a success making one corner.
I use my Bosch glide for compound miters .
Good Luck with a tablesaw

- Aj2

If it helps anyone, it s a win. Thanks guys

- therealSteveN

Did you make a tray with four corners?

- Aj2

Aj if that question is to me, yes I have made many a Butler tray, and hung miles of Crown moulding, and a few compound picture frames, so yes I have some familiarity with cutting compound angles. You seem to be hung up on doing it 4 times so they form a square, or a rectangle. So it’s easy for you to do a corner, but not 4 of them, do I have that right? The answer is in being able to cut complimentary lengths, but that is true for much more mundane cuts to even make a box, that will square up. How to do that with a Compound cut on a TS, read on.

IF, a person wants to make a Butler tray, frame, or picture frame using compound joinery they need to make their guide stick as long, actually longer works better, than the longest piece they plan to make. So if a frame was to be 37”, make your stick 40” You want that length so you can attach a stop. You know a “length limiter.” Your first cut isn’t much except nailing the compound cut, it is actually the next 3 that will be problematic if you don’t get the length right. You can do this with making a mark, and measuring very carefully to the next mark. I believe in the video Matt was using the prior cuts through his fence to line up where his saw would cut. Using that is workable to always get close, exact, probably not. That would be just the same as making a mark, and trying to cut exactly to it, close a lot, maybe enough to think you are nailing it, but always with a margin of error.

Using a fence with a stop block, you can get dead nutz on it. You measure one time, maybe twice if you have a long piece, and a short, but on each, EVEN if you mess it up, all the parts will end up being complimentary length. For a picture frame, you can fudge what most are out. On a Butler tray, you may need another bottom, probably not if you are witty. The guy with a mark, or looking at a prior kerf to line up, they could get corners that don’t touch so well, again complimentary lengths, but alas, they don’t have em nailed.

Having a stop, I can’t assist you further if you are unable to cut complimentary lengths with a compound angle at the end of each. Unless you give more information about the error you are getting.

-- Think safe, be safe

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therealSteveN

2797 posts in 960 days


#13 posted 05-24-2019 03:59 AM

I forgot to ad, about complimentary lengths. Ask any old woodworker if he would rather be accurate, or consistent. All of the ones I know would say consistent. Accurate could get you one piece EXACTLY 37” long, doesn’t help make a square corner if the next is 38”. Start adding up different numbers, and increase the pieces to 4, 8, whatever sided whatever you want to make.

Consistent, and you are looking for a square shape, 4 sided. If all four pieces are 36 15/16” long, that makes a really sweet looking 37” piccchur frame.

-- Think safe, be safe

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therealSteveN

2797 posts in 960 days


#14 posted 05-24-2019 04:04 AM



I guess everyone has there preferred method for consuming instructive information. For me the written word with illustrations is my preferred method. I guess I m an oldy from another era, but I find videos are more entertaining than instructive. I have most of RJ s books on my shelves and many magazine articles. RJ and the Capotostos were the bread and butter for many of the popular DIY magazines back in the 60 s,70 s, and 80 s.

- Carlos510

I have me some RJ laying about, but I’ll differ in that seeing it done, while spoken is my preferred method. Key is figuring out how you learn, and embrace it.

-- Think safe, be safe

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