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Maple Sewing Desk

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Forum topic by socrbent posted 05-19-2019 07:48 PM 300 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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socrbent

864 posts in 2657 days


05-19-2019 07:48 PM

Looking for suggestions on how to finish a large sewing desk I’m making for my wife. It is made of maple veneered plywood for the carcass of the two 25”W x 25”D x 30” high drawer units and the 77” x 29” top. I have added solid maple edging to all exposed plywood wedges. the poplar drawer units have solid maple faces. Other than 1/4” beads on top and bottom of drawer faces it is a very simple design with a 3”, 6”, 6” and 11” deep drawers on each side and a 3” in middle. The maple has some nice figure especially the drawer fronts that I would like to accent and wife has expressed interest in a darker color than natural maple. Looking for a very durable finish for the top. I will likely use my hvlp sprayer to apply finish unless a suggestion from you would be work better. Suggestions?

-- socrbent Ohio


9 replies so far

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therealSteveN

2812 posts in 962 days


#1 posted 05-19-2019 09:17 PM

As furniture a sewing piece will be handled a LOT more than a table at you bedside, or virtually any other piece of furniture, save maybe a dining table, especially if kids are involved. Drawer knobs constantly pulled open, forearms resting on the edge, cutting, sewing. A LOT of touching. For that I wouldn’t consider anything except a durable topcoat.

I have a sprayer, but seldom use it, instead I like touching a finish on, and I like Arm r Seal for that, using a lint free cloth to get it on. It will dry Amber being an Oil base.

If you want to keep the clean whitish look, I’d use their High Performance Water Based Topcoat.

In case you didn’t notice I like their products as lot. This is a good compare the product link.

-- Think safe, be safe

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socrbent

864 posts in 2657 days


#2 posted 05-21-2019 07:54 PM

Thanks Steven. I have had good results with General Finishes.

-- socrbent Ohio

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OSU55

2300 posts in 2378 days


#3 posted 05-21-2019 08:45 PM

I would spray the topcoat for something that large. If you have good ventilation, precat lacquer. If you dont, waterbased poly Target em9000 or GF Hi Performance, or possibly a wb poly for floors.

For color I like Target stain base em4000 with transtint dye, or they have premixed colors. It needs a sealer coat of dewaxed shellac for a wb topcoat. The shellac can be toned with transtint to even out and intensify the color. Can also tint the wb topcoat with transtint. The shellac also provides chatoyance for wb finishes.

For lacquer one of the GF dye stains would work. Just a dye in water or alcohol will work but a carrier with more open time is better to prevent lap marks. The lacquer will provide chatoyance.

For maple you will need blotch control, read about here.

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zoro39

14 posts in 28 days


#4 posted 05-21-2019 10:26 PM

Like Steven, I too have an HVLP sprayer but seldom use it.
There is cabinetry and there is fine furniture.
For cabinetry, I have mostly gone with shellac thanks especially to the Mario Rodriguez FWW “Make Shellac Your Go-To Finish”.
For fine furniture, I have in the past used the great Garrett Hack Oil-Varnish finish, usually 6 coats.
Of late, I have been using the Christian Becksvoort Tried & True oil finish FWW 206 and FWW article from 2009. This is a rub on finish with 1 coat of straight Danish Oil and 2 coats of 2/3 Thried & True Varnish Oil and 1/3 Spar Varnish.
I’m just finishing a curio cabinet with this finish and I will be posting pics soon.

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socrbent

864 posts in 2657 days


#5 posted 05-23-2019 12:32 AM

Thanks guys for the suggestions. Didn’t think about blotch control – thanks.

Got closer to finishing today – completed the two base units and drawers. Just have to complete edging the top and final sanding.

Further question – General Finishes recommends only sanding to 150 prior to using their oil based stain. A lot of the project is sanded to 220 already. Do I go back and sand with 150 or proceed as is?

-- socrbent Ohio

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OSU55

2300 posts in 2378 days


#6 posted 05-23-2019 03:48 PM

I think that stain has significant pigment in it, which gets lodged in the scratches left by sandpaper, as well as negative grain and defects.. The final grit to sand to depends on how much of the pigment color you want vs the liquid dye part of the stain. Suggest you do samples at 150 and 220 and decide which you like better.

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socrbent

864 posts in 2657 days


#7 posted 05-23-2019 03:57 PM

That sounds like good advise. Sample, sample, sample….

-- socrbent Ohio

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therealSteveN

2812 posts in 962 days


#8 posted 05-24-2019 10:59 PM

Keep in mind Dye isn’t the same, and you can use it sanded out at least to 320, as I have done it.

My go to for Maple is Shellac, if I want it clear I use a SUPER blonde, and make it a 1# cut, sometimes needs 2 coats. Over that I can use the Arm r Seal, and I’m about bulletproof. Sometimes I want the color, and I use the Lockwood dyes at Tools for Working Woods right in my Shellac. When I get that done, I go to the Arm r Seal.

That sample thing, doesn’t even matter of you have done the finish schedule before, test it on some project scrap. I even prep the sample boards to the same level as the project. Once something goes on, it’s such a PIA to get back to wood, if you can.

-- Think safe, be safe

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socrbent

864 posts in 2657 days


#9 posted 05-25-2019 12:20 AM

Thanks for the advise Steven

-- socrbent Ohio

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