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Finish Technique for Maple Bed

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Forum topic by Kevin posted 05-13-2019 07:37 PM 315 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kevin

476 posts in 3600 days


05-13-2019 07:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: maple finish dye stain glaze shellac

Hello,

I am in the process of building a new bed out of solid (soft maple) and was wanting to get some ideas on the best way to finish. Here are a couple ideas, but would always enjoy opinions and techniques from fellow lumberjocks expertise!

I would like for the final tone to be close to this from the general finish website. 1st row / 4th is Amber.
https://generalfinishes.com/wood-finishes-retail/water-based-wood-stains-and-dye-stains/water-based-dye-stain

Looks like you will need to click on <colors> then <dye>

option #1
- dye the wood to get a tone
- use dewaxed shellac
- use glazing stain
- (seal with lacquer) ?

option #2
- danish oil
- (would you seal with lacquer/varnish) ?

option #3
- Open to other ideas :)

Thanks,

Kevin

-- Williamsburg, KY


16 replies so far

View JKN's profile

JKN

10 posts in 1091 days


#1 posted 05-13-2019 07:45 PM

Minwax Antique Oil Finish

2 coats, let it soak in then wipe off excess
Let sit for 2 days, then a coat of clear Briwax

Good luck

John

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SMP

1058 posts in 300 days


#2 posted 05-13-2019 08:48 PM

Option 4: use that general finishes stain you linked to, applying as per directions, topcoat with 3 coats of satin arm-r-seal.

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Kevin

476 posts in 3600 days


#3 posted 05-13-2019 08:59 PM

Thanks for the suggestions!

I saw on another site the antique oil finish was popular. I’ll go check out the arm-r-seal also as I have not used it before.

Thanks!

-- Williamsburg, KY

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Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#4 posted 05-13-2019 09:58 PM

In option 1, what’s the purpose of the glaze? Are you going for an antique look? Also, if you do go with dye, use a blotch control first. Maple can be bad. Just 1 part white glue in 6 or 8 parts water. Brush it on liberally and wipe it even. Let dry and sand off the raised grain. Be sure to do test boards so you’ll know if you need a second application of the blotch control.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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OSU55

2316 posts in 2384 days


#5 posted 05-14-2019 12:00 PM

Option 3 – use oil based dye mixed into ars. Thin first 2 coats 1:1 apply like danish oil, then finish out the way you want with the toned ars. Regardless of what you do you are coloring maple and as Rich said will need blotch control. Here is a blog on blotch control. Glazing can be done between coats

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Kevin

476 posts in 3600 days


#6 posted 05-14-2019 12:34 PM

Rich, yeah it was for an antique look I was pondering on. The blotching is the most important thing I’m concentrating on really, I do not want blotching. In my last maple furniture I built I believe I minimized blotching pretty good.

OSU55, I’ve watched a few videos which seem to follow that method, but it was for curly maple instead of regular soft maple.

Thanks for the help everyone!

Kevin

-- Williamsburg, KY

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Kevin

476 posts in 3600 days


#7 posted 05-14-2019 03:01 PM

Interesting article on the glue/blotch control, never really heard about that. How much of each do you guys usually mix up when conditioning a work piece?

Kevin

-- Williamsburg, KY

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Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#8 posted 05-14-2019 03:27 PM


Interesting article on the glue/blotch control, never really heard about that. How much of each do you guys usually mix up when conditioning a work piece?

- Kevin

I use mason jars for most of things like that and dyes, etc, and do a quart at a time so I have some around. You want to apply it liberally, and you might need two applications, so keep that in mind. Wet the surface, wait a few minutes and wipe with a damp cloth so it’s even, then let dry a couple of hours. Sand lightly with fine paper or non-woven pad to remove the raised grain.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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Kevin

476 posts in 3600 days


#9 posted 05-14-2019 03:42 PM

Nice. I’ll be testing this out soon.

Thanks.

Kevin

-- Williamsburg, KY

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Kevin

476 posts in 3600 days


#10 posted 05-14-2019 08:12 PM

So basically 1/2c of glue and 3.5c of distilled water for a 1:8 ratio in a quart mason jar correct, give or take a little?

Interesting article on the glue/blotch control, never really heard about that. How much of each do you guys usually mix up when conditioning a work piece?

- Kevin

I use mason jars for most of things like that and dyes, etc, and do a quart at a time so I have some around. You want to apply it liberally, and you might need two applications, so keep that in mind. Wet the surface, wait a few minutes and wipe with a damp cloth so it s even, then let dry a couple of hours. Sand lightly with fine paper or non-woven pad to remove the raised grain.

- Rich


-- Williamsburg, KY

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Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#11 posted 05-14-2019 08:17 PM


So basically 1/2c of glue and 3.5c of distilled water for a 1:8 ratio in a quart mason jar correct, give or take a little?

- Kevin

Yep. It’s a little difficult to make a smooth mixture, and the glue will settle with time.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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Kevin

476 posts in 3600 days


#12 posted 05-14-2019 08:24 PM

Ty Rich!

So basically 1/2c of glue and 3.5c of distilled water for a 1:8 ratio in a quart mason jar correct, give or take a little?

- Kevin

Yep. It s a little difficult to make a smooth mixture, and the glue will settle with time.

- Rich


-- Williamsburg, KY

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Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#13 posted 05-14-2019 08:31 PM


Ty Rich!

- Kevin

Glad to help. Thank OSU55 too. The stuff really does work.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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Kevin

476 posts in 3600 days


#14 posted 05-14-2019 08:36 PM

Yeah, I’ve been reading his article/blogs for the past hour or so and trying to learn something there :)

OSU55, forgive me, but I have been wondering what are “ars”?

Ty!

-- Williamsburg, KY

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OSU55

2316 posts in 2384 days


#15 posted 05-14-2019 09:32 PM

ARS is Arm-r-seal by GF. Glue sizing works great for blotching but as Rich said it will settle out in just a few days. Just mix it up well and it can still be used. I tend to mix smaller batches for that reason. Waterbased finishes work well also and dont settle out but are a bit more expensive than glue. Also as Rich said sand the raised grain after the blotch control is dry – I use the next grit higher than the finish sand, only by hand with the grain and a light touch – getting too heavy can create the blotching again. I prefer paper vs nonwoven pad as it cuts better.

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