LumberJocks

Farmhouse Table. Breadboard Ends. Glued. Split. Advice?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Keith Kelly posted 05-09-2019 04:45 PM 1946 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

344 posts in 2951 days


05-09-2019 04:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hi. A friend bought a breadboard-style table from a guy who fully glued on the breadboard ends. As you’d expect, splittage.

I’m trying to identify what to do moving fowrard, and see two options:

1) Do it right: Cut off the ends, re-glue the main part, cut mortise & tenon using some proper method and redo the breadboard ends properly w/ dowels, elongated holes, etc. I have personally never done breadboard ends but am acquainted with the concept and process.

2) Hack and hope: Route out a 1/4” groove down the split and fill it with a new piece of wood. I like this method because it would be much quicker. But it doesn’t fix the issue.

Nevermind number 2. There are multiple splits and they aren’t straight.

Are there any other options I’m failing to consider? What would you do it if was your friend’s table?

-- Keith | Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/KeithsTestGarage


12 replies so far

View Delete's profile

Delete

439 posts in 1659 days


#1 posted 05-09-2019 06:02 PM

It would be more work and set-up but a close fitting dove tailing of the ends, works good, looks good and if you fix the center with a dowel will allow expansion and contraction evenly from the center out to both sides.

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

783 posts in 3222 days


#2 posted 05-09-2019 08:53 PM

Option 3…. Do nothing as it the look is definitely rustic farmhouse table based on the wood selection used and staining. I don’t see the crack as distracting from its look and fits the pieced. Only downside to cracks in a rustic farmhouse table ends up being more about how the table is used.

If this were a walnut or cherry table and not as rustic I would look into fixing it proper

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

6069 posts in 3638 days


#3 posted 05-09-2019 10:12 PM

It looks like construction lumber, probably easier to make a new one than to mess with it. Another consideration besides the breadboards is how it is attached to the table, wood movement has to be allowed for there as well.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Delete's profile

Delete

439 posts in 1659 days


#4 posted 05-09-2019 11:39 PM

To clear up my suggestion, it would be one dovetail the width of the table at each end, like I said more work, circular saw, straight edge guides, chisels etc. Or if you can find a dovetail router bit that large, just a router and straight edge guides.

View SMP's profile

SMP

4968 posts in 1193 days


#5 posted 05-09-2019 11:55 PM

How old is it? Curious if thats all its going to move or will fall apart in a couple years if you just leave it.

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

344 posts in 2951 days


#6 posted 05-10-2019 01:24 AM


How old is it? Curious if thats all its going to move or will fall apart in a couple years if you just leave it.

- SMP

10 months. (edit)

Thanks for all the advice. That helps with direction.

-- Keith | Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/KeithsTestGarage

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2295 posts in 1466 days


#7 posted 05-10-2019 01:40 AM

Make them a new top using a rustic grade cherry, hickory, oak. Skip the breadboard end.

I always wonder why people use 2×6 for tops. For 50$ more, they could have had a hardwood top that would last decades.

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

344 posts in 2951 days


#8 posted 05-10-2019 01:55 AM



I always wonder why people use 2×6 for tops. For 50$ more, they could have had a hardwood top that would last decades. – CWWoodworking

I have a few guesses…

-- Keith | Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/KeithsTestGarage

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13585 posts in 3667 days


#9 posted 05-10-2019 03:36 AM

Ana White special. Probably have to cut off the breadboards then remove the table top and reattach it correctly. I’m speculating based on many dozens of others I’ve seen like it. Also, enjoy cleaning crumbs from all those gaps.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

344 posts in 2951 days


#10 posted 05-10-2019 04:29 AM



Ana White special.
- Woodknack

That was one of them.

-- Keith | Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/KeithsTestGarage

View SMP's profile

SMP

4968 posts in 1193 days


#11 posted 05-10-2019 05:04 AM

How old is it? Curious if thats all its going to move or will fall apart in a couple years if you just leave it.

- SMP

10 months. (edit)

Thanks for all the advice. That helps with direction.

- Keith Kelly

My guess is it will keep getting worse over time. Personally since this is a rustic table made of construction lumber , I’d probably saw off the breadboard ends, and maybe just use 3 lag bolts to reattach(assuming you need for length) Drill holes too big on the outer 2 (just on breadboard), predrill end of table, and use fender washers or malleable washers and paint them all flat back. That adds to that rustic farmhouse look but allows movement. Then you’re only out a few bucks in hardware and maybe 20-30 minutes time. But as mentioned, better check how the top is attached to the base/legs and account for that also.

View rwachtell's profile

rwachtell

7 posts in 3768 days


#12 posted 10-26-2021 03:10 PM

I can’t tell you how many breadboard table tops I have made now.

The mortise and tenon method is also very capable of cracking a table even if done correctly. It is very easy for pins to serve as wedges that produce cracks down the center section.

The single most important aspect in avoiding cracks in a bread board table is wood moisture content at glue up ( regardless of the method ) then wood grain ( quarter VS flat) , then wood type, then method of joinery.

In your case, if he used well quarter sawed lumber in the middle section with a hardwood with low expansion rate ( most hardwoods are as compared to a softwood such as your table ) that was dried to about 9% ( not any lower ) at glue up time, he and you would MOST LIKLY have never of had a cracking problem nor ever will. Its best to be a bit above as dry as possible in this scenario. But your table was made with big fat flat grain and a softwood to boot. That is a tough one for sure.

Quartersawn has a lower expansion/contraction rate and much better elasticity rate then flat sawn. Both of which are highly beneficial if one wishes to avoid cracks in woodwork. You will notice that when you see face checks in lumber on decking on a wood porch it is almost always in the center flat grain section of the piece of decking.

The wider the table is the more likely a problem is to occur. Length of the table is no factor.

But good quartersawn hardwood lumber is VERY expensive to non existent now. So that is why I have a Woodmizer and make my own.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com