LumberJocks

Vintage Craftsman Table Saw Motor Upgrade Opinions

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Injuner posted 05-07-2019 09:54 PM 1079 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Injuner's profile

Injuner

16 posts in 49 days


05-07-2019 09:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman 100 11329991 vintage tablesaw

Guys…HELLO! This is my first post here. Not sure what has taken me so long to find my way over to this forum. I’ve spent some time searching through existing threads and quickly discovered that this is a very cool place to “hang out”. Hoping to find the time to check in here regularly!

On to my question(s)...I recently acquired a Craftsman 100 table saw model 113.29991 and have started the refurbing process. I was fortunate in that most everything was intact with the saw, including the original 1 HP motor. I’ve decided to replace the armature bearings as they were slightly noisy, but other than the bearings, the motor is in great shape. Typically, the motors of today are rated differently than those of yesteryear, so ideally an old 1 HP motor from 1960 could honestly be considered to be more like a 1-1/2 HP motor by today’s standards. All that being said, I am curious as to what everyone’s experiences have been with using the original Craftsman 100 1 HP motor for todays woodworking projects? Do most of you find that as long as the original motor is in good condition, it performs adequately for your needs or have you felt the need to upgrade the motor? If so, what horsepower motor did you decide to go with and where did you find it for a reasonable price? If I find it necessary to upgrade the original motor, I’d like to stay with a 115v model rather than moving up to 230v.

Current upgrades planned:
New bearings for spindle and motor
New cast iron sheaves and link belt
PAL kit for rear trunnion
Vega Fence system
Front mounted power switch

The saw is currently completely disassembled and being thoroughly cleaned before repainting and reassembly. Any input and/or suggestions are welcome! Thanks for any information you guys may be able to provide.


21 replies so far

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1427 posts in 2030 days


#1 posted 05-07-2019 10:52 PM

Pictures pictures pictures.
I’d love to see pictures of the process and progress.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2093 posts in 3836 days


#2 posted 05-07-2019 11:06 PM

I had one not quite that old. I think you will find the original motor fine for most work but if you have a lot of ripping of hard wood, like oak or maple, it may not be up to the task and will over heat.
I enjoy seeing folks rebuild old machines but as far as value goes I don’t think it would be worth the cost of putting a new and or bigger motor on it.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Injuner's profile

Injuner

16 posts in 49 days


#3 posted 05-08-2019 12:27 AM

Just need to see how this forum works for posting pictures then I’ll gladly update this thread with photos of my progress.

View Injuner's profile

Injuner

16 posts in 49 days


#4 posted 05-14-2019 09:48 PM

Here are a few pictures of the saw when I first brought it home:

View Injuner's profile

Injuner

16 posts in 49 days


#5 posted 05-14-2019 09:53 PM

Some more as I tore into it:

And some additional pictures as I starting the cleaning process and paint:

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

750 posts in 933 days


#6 posted 05-14-2019 11:23 PM

Good luck with your project. I had a similar Craftsman Table saw that I bought in 1983. I used the saw and original motor with no problems until 2016 when I gave it to my brother. He’s still using it. I found the motor to be adequate for 90% of my work. I sawed and cut lap joints in Pressure treated 2×4’s, re-sawed pressure treated 4×4’s, I sawed oak and cherry, you name it, I cut it with that saw. About the only time it gave me trouble was when I made bird houses. I make 200 bird houses a year for my 8th grade students to put together. Takes about 4 days of sawing and rabbeting to get the 1400 parts cut. I put rabbet joints on the sides to make a nice project out of it. I found when my saw was running for longer than 5 hours, I had to give it a rest.

All in all, I think it was a GREAT saw.

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View Injuner's profile

Injuner

16 posts in 49 days


#7 posted 05-15-2019 12:46 AM

Thanks for the post Kelster! Glad to learn that you found the 1HP motor adequate for your needs. I’m going to go with the original motor until I find a real reason to consider upgrade it. I installed some new bearings for the armature, gave it a through cleaning and shot it with some paint. It is whisper quite and shows no signs of any issues.

View Injuner's profile

Injuner

16 posts in 49 days


#8 posted 05-15-2019 12:24 PM

Some test fitting to see how it will all go back together…

View Injuner's profile

Injuner

16 posts in 49 days


#9 posted 05-20-2019 01:42 AM

While I impatiently wait for my order from In-Line Industries to ship (not sure it ever will based upon what I’ve read recently) I spent some time building a new base for the table saw. This one will have dust extraction and built in retractable casters.

View Injuner's profile

Injuner

16 posts in 49 days


#10 posted 05-20-2019 11:40 AM

While I impatiently wait for my order from In-Line Industries to ship (not sure it ever will based upon what I’ve read recently) I spent some time building a new base for the table saw. This one will have dust extraction and built in retractable casters.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9576 posts in 1532 days


#11 posted 05-20-2019 12:49 PM

That paint job looks incredible! Nice work on the restoration. I have a similar saw sitting idle waiting for some TLC. Not sure if I’ll ever get to it but it’s a nice thought…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Injuner's profile

Injuner

16 posts in 49 days


#12 posted 05-20-2019 05:15 PM

Thanks for the kind words Kenny! How you find the time to tear into your project saw…it’s great therapy. Short of a couple of safety and convenience features, these older shop tools seem as well or better built then much of what is sold today.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9576 posts in 1532 days


#13 posted 05-20-2019 05:22 PM

Couldn’t agree more. I’ve restored several old tools that are users in my shop. I’m just not in need of a table saw so that one seems to continually fall to the bottom of the list. I love my Powermatic table saw so I’m honestly not even sure what I’d do with the dang thing if I did get it restored :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7388 posts in 2592 days


#14 posted 05-20-2019 06:10 PM

Short of a couple of safety and convenience features, these older shop tools seem as well or better built then much of what is sold today.
- Injuner

Consider this… according to the 1960 Sears catalog, that saw; their “BIggest and Best Bench Saw”; without a motor, stand, guard or extension wings sold for $117.95:

With a 1hp motor, it sold for $154.45. That would be $1,347 in todays dollars. And that doesn’t even include the guard ($12.95), stand ($29.95) or extension wings ($14.95 each) – so a fully configured machine in todays dollars would cost over $2000!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Injuner's profile

Injuner

16 posts in 49 days


#15 posted 05-20-2019 06:57 PM

I figured that the 1960 Craftsman Table Saw sold for somewhere in the $125 range! Adjusting for inflation/cost of living I would still consider buying one at today’s prices. Not much you can purchase today that will be operational 60 years from now, much less able to purchase parts to restore it.

I suppose for that amount of $$$ I would consider the purchase of a Powermatic or Sawstop…

But I’d have no problem outfitting my shop with most power tools from the 1960’s.

showing 1 through 15 of 21 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com