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Dust collection pipe layout

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Forum topic by Lookwow posted 05-06-2019 09:25 PM 657 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lookwow

11 posts in 436 days


05-06-2019 09:25 PM

So the new shop I’m setting up is a 3rd garage stall that is 37ft deep. Dust collector is in the back corner. I’ll have tools mainly on both walls.

Should I run one main pipe down the middle and split off for tools or split shortly after dust collector and run a pipe down each side?


20 replies so far

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CarlosInTheSticks

413 posts in 794 days


#1 posted 05-06-2019 09:53 PM

I’m sure you will get a good selection of opinions, but I would split off into one pipe down each wall. There are a few reasons. First you will be using 8 less 90 degree fittings (if you have 8 connections to make) resulting in lower cost. You may say “yes but I am spending more in pipe”, if you have more than 4 or 5 connections, you will not pay more in pipe. Second and more important, by removing a 90 degree fitting out of each connection, your DC suction efficiency will benefit greatly.

-- "There are no utopias, chaos theory reigns, anyone who says different is selling you something"

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Redoak49

4052 posts in 2411 days


#2 posted 05-06-2019 10:27 PM

It would be helpful to know what dust collector, tools to connect and size of pipe you will use.

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ibewjon

685 posts in 3215 days


#3 posted 05-07-2019 12:27 AM

I split shortly after DC. A blast gate shuts down either side. I ran 5” heavy gage duct, bought my long radius 90’s from Oneida, and made my own Y’s using a spot welder from harbor freight, and paint on duct sealer, saving enough on the y’s to pay for the welder. My collector is also in one corner,. I have an older 2 HP collector that I upgraded with the jet pleated filter and vortex cone. I do not have a cyclone. There are 4 90’s going to the far wall where my 8” jointer lives, and there are no collection or clogging issues. I did run this run up to and across the ceiling to get to this far wall. Otherwise, I ran the ducts about 3’ high, with y’s and gates for each machine. I installed a 6” shelf over the ducts for small tools, parts, whatever. Not running on the ceiling saves having to lift the chips all the way up to the ceiling. I am very happy with the results. Hope this long post helps you.

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BJODay

528 posts in 2365 days


#4 posted 06-11-2019 02:56 AM

Ibewjon:
Can you post some pics?
Thanks BJ

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2712 posts in 3344 days


#5 posted 06-11-2019 04:07 AM

I have a small shop but I want to keep the duct run distance at a minimum, Instead of having a duct running from the dust collector up to the ceiling and down to each piece of equipment I opted to run my duct along the wall at floor level. This eliminates the up and down duct to each piece of equipment.. I also placed all my equipment along the walls. Mine is 6” duct.

-- No PHD just a DD214

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Redoak49

4052 posts in 2411 days


#6 posted 06-11-2019 11:45 AM

A lot depends on your dust collector and the space you have. I would do things differently with a 1.5 hp versus a 3 hp dc. A 37 ft run on a smaller DC is difficult. With a powerful dc, you do not need to worry as much about piping.

As mentioned, the type of machines and where you have them is important to know for us to help you.

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ibewjon

685 posts in 3215 days


#7 posted 06-11-2019 12:36 PM

It’s kind of hard to get pictures . I simply split two ways at the DC, ran a run to the right, and around the corner. About 3’ above floor, with a long radius 90 at the corner, and a floor sweep at the end, and a capped clean out in case of clogs. Y’s with blast gates for each machine. Easy to reach the gates. The other run went up to the ceiling with a y for a future overhead TS pickup. After I got past door and window, I dropped down to 3’ again and went 15’ along that wall for jointer and planer and a y to connect under the concrete floor to my crawl space and someday up through concrete for lower TS connection. I will try to do some pictures but they really won’t show very well. I put just enough flex to each machine to pull it out from wall to use.

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ibewjon

685 posts in 3215 days


#8 posted 06-11-2019 01:41 PM

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ibewjon

685 posts in 3215 days


#9 posted 06-11-2019 01:45 PM

The last picture is behind the DC where it splits to go right and up to cross the ceiling. Left side is top. The first picture is the drop down from the ceiling across the shop. I used a y in place of a 90 to leave a cleanout port. The mains are 5” – 26 guage, and drops are 4”.

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ibewjon

685 posts in 3215 days


#10 posted 06-11-2019 01:57 PM

I have four of these control panels in the shop to stop and start the main power and start and stop the DC. I also have the TS, jointer, planer, and shaper wired with current switches to automatically start the DC when I start these machines. There is a time delay after stopping to allow dust and chips to get to the DC.
The left of the picture is top.. Rotate 90 to the right .

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Sark

139 posts in 782 days


#11 posted 06-20-2019 05:10 AM

Ibewjon, could you share some more about how you made the wyes with a spot welder? How did you measure and cut the ducting accurately? This is the first time I’ve heard of someone fabricating their own metal fittings, and it seems like a great useful skill to have. I want to learn more. Thanks.

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ibewjon

685 posts in 3215 days


#12 posted 06-20-2019 02:31 PM

For anyone interested, I used a spot welder from Harbor Freight. Available in either 120 or 240v. I then sell around the branch with paint on sir duct sealer. I will try to get patterns I developed for myself grideed and posted for all. I have patterns for 4×4x4, 5×5x5, and 5×5x4” branch. You can also make a double branch off the main. I will work on it this weekend if I have time.

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farmfromkansas

57 posts in 36 days


#13 posted 06-20-2019 04:41 PM

I used to have books till we moved and the wife threw them away, with patterns how to lay out fittings in sheet metal. Think of that every time I need to buy a high priced fitting. I just took off long ways down shop, and use Y’s and a elbow to drop at machines. Did do a 45 degree move to make the piping close to table saw and drop down to band saw and edge sander. Get the shop layout right with your machines before you run the pipe. Lot of trouble to move your piping if you decide the saw needs to move. Would say build something with your machinery in the shop area, and make sure you like how your machines set in that area.

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farmfromkansas

57 posts in 36 days


#14 posted 06-20-2019 04:42 PM

I used to have books till we moved and the wife threw them away, with patterns how to lay out fittings in sheet metal. Think of that every time I need to buy a high priced fitting. I just took off long ways down shop, and use Y’s and a elbow to drop at machines. Did do a 45 degree move to make the piping close to table saw and drop down to band saw and edge sander. Get the shop layout right with your machines before you run the pipe. Lot of trouble to move your piping if you decide the saw needs to move. Would say build something with your machinery in the shop area, and make sure you like how your machines set in that area.

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ibewjon

685 posts in 3215 days


#15 posted 06-21-2019 02:20 PM

These are the patterns for a 5” run with a 4” tap wye. I have not found the pattern for 5 on 5, but you should be able to expand this from 4 to 5. I have also posted this on 6 vs 5” duct thread. I made these patterns from the lightest guage 4 & 5 duct I could buy to make it easier to wrap around the 26 guage. DO NOT snapy the pipe together till cut to shape.

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