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turner walker 1938 table saw

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Forum topic by Turns4wood posted 05-06-2019 01:50 AM 463 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Turns4wood

51 posts in 294 days


05-06-2019 01:50 AM

I just picked up a table saw that was my father in laws and it is in pretty good shape the dilemma is to tear it a part and paint the main casting leaving the saw set in the trunions saw is square to the world. I don’t want to mess with a good thing although the added work to get back to its old glory might be worth it looking for old post of someone doing a rebuild
Jerry

-- Nothing better than sawdust on the floor


7 replies so far

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MrUnix

7480 posts in 2711 days


#1 posted 05-06-2019 02:09 AM

First thing you need to do is determine exactly what machine you have so you can find a parts diagram and manual for it. In 1938, Walker Turner made at least 3 different saws. You can use the resources over at the Vintage Machinery site (vintagemachinery.org) to browse the photo and documentation archives to aid in identifying (Click here).

After that, you can head on over to the OWWM (Old WoodWorking/Metalworking machinery) site to see if anyone else has been through the restore on that machine, ask questions and get tons of additional support for your restoration.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Turns4wood

51 posts in 294 days


#2 posted 05-07-2019 01:40 AM

Anyone out there have the paint code for a 1938 Walker Turner table saw of that year

-- Nothing better than sawdust on the floor

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Planeman40

1452 posts in 3273 days


#3 posted 05-07-2019 09:51 PM

Regarding painting vintage machinery. If you can find something on the machine with the original paint in good condition, you can take it to Sherwin Williams and a number of other paint stores and they can scan the paint to match the color by computer. This has worked well for me. I always use oil-base enamel for painting machinery as it is very hard and wears well when it has properly cured for a few weeks.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Turns4wood

51 posts in 294 days


#4 posted 05-08-2019 02:05 AM

I have done that with other builds restores just haven’t come up with a small piece that is a good sample might have to take in a side panel smallest poss. piece with good color It’s more of a blue grey than say the old battleship gray

-- Nothing better than sawdust on the floor

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MrUnix

7480 posts in 2711 days


#5 posted 05-08-2019 02:12 AM

Have you seen this over at the VintageMachinery Knowledge Base (Wiki)?

Paint Colors - Walker-Turner
(http://wiki.vintagemachinery.org/PaintColorsWalkerTurner.ashx)

Although there is no one standard color that was used, which is typical of most manufacturers at the time… while close, there were slight variations even between the same machines built in the same year. In addition, the paint used will oxidize over the years, so what it looks like today is not what it looked like back then.

If you want an accurate match to YOUR machine, getting a color match with a hidden part somewhere on the machine is your best bet. Under bolted on castings and under machine badges are ideal locations to find as close to original as you will get. I have never seen a machine yet that didn’t have at least one spot suitable.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Turns4wood

51 posts in 294 days


#6 posted 05-08-2019 01:13 PM

That’s a good reference I will pull the switch off and look behind it it really is an odd color. Sort of like seeing an old Massey Ferggison or Farmall that has been redone you really don’t expect those bright colors

-- Nothing better than sawdust on the floor

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Brawler

72 posts in 343 days


#7 posted 05-08-2019 02:46 PM

When you get to cleaning the machines badges, I found making a paste out of baking soda and water and using a toothbrush makes them almost like new.

-- Daniel

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