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Trouble coloring plywood

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Forum topic by bygrace posted 05-04-2019 10:18 PM 475 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bygrace

198 posts in 2384 days


05-04-2019 10:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question oak arts and crafts finishing

Making a floor cabinet with white oakand used 1/4 inch ply from a hardwood dealer on the sides and back. As you can see the strips of veneer came out different hues and looks striped. Not what I wanted. I actually had to look very closely to see where the jpints were before i stained it, so this was bery unexpected. Should I have been able to see this beforehand? Or should i have done something different when staining? Conditioner maybe? Is there anything i can do now besides striping it and starting over?

-- Andy, Waxahachie, Tx.


25 replies so far

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SMP

1151 posts in 321 days


#1 posted 05-05-2019 01:03 AM

Do you know what grade you purchased(or paid for)?

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bygrace

198 posts in 2384 days


#2 posted 05-05-2019 01:12 AM

The receipt says A-4. Havent had much experience with plywood before. The 3/4 inch board was A-1.

-- Andy, Waxahachie, Tx.

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SMP

1151 posts in 321 days


#3 posted 05-05-2019 01:32 AM



The receipt says A-4. Havent had much experience with plywood before. The 3/4 inch board was A-1.

- bygrace

Hmm so you should have an a face. Then another question, how is the other side(inside)? And is this cabinet glued together or able to take apart? I guess a better question.

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bygrace

198 posts in 2384 days


#4 posted 05-05-2019 02:06 AM

Glued mortice and tenon, so no taking apart. Lol. The ply only has one good side. I knew that when i bought it. But it was all they had in stock in white oak. Any way, I did make sure the good side was facing out. The other side had some “cracks” in the face. The A side gave no indication there was a problem. I had to look very closely to see the seams in the lamination.

-- Andy, Waxahachie, Tx.

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SMP

1151 posts in 321 days


#5 posted 05-05-2019 02:28 AM


Glued mortice and tenon, so no taking apart. Lol. The ply only has one good side. I knew that when i bought it. But it was all they had in stock in white oak. Any way, I did make sure the good side was facing out. The other side had some “cracks” in the face. The A side gave no indication there was a problem. I had to look very closely to see the seams in the lamination.

- bygrace

Thats a tough one. If removable could put some bookmatched veneer on. Is it only stained so far? And do you have any scrap left where you could test with more coats of stain on the lighter slice?

Btw, tip for next time, find the seam and rub some denatured alcohol around it and you can get a feel for what will happen with topcoat.

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CWWoodworking

528 posts in 594 days


#6 posted 05-05-2019 02:45 AM

Next time try a multi step finish including dyes.

For this, if your confident in your ability, you could try some toners. I recently made this ent center. One of the doors turned out lighter than I liked. Used a toner to even it out. I think it turned out nice.

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bilyo

723 posts in 1518 days


#7 posted 05-07-2019 10:30 PM

You don’t say where your are in the finishing process. Have you gone beyond applying stain? You can perhaps correct the miss match by using a toner made from shellac and a compatible dye like Transtint. I assume you will want to match the darker part of the ply end panel. You may start with a garnet shellac and add drops of medium brown Transtint until you get the color you want. The color of the toner should be not quite as dark as your final color. Pad or spray the toner on the lighter part of the panel one coat at a time. As you add coats, it will get darker until it blends with the darker color. I like using an air brush for small areas like this. It also makes it easy to blend the coats.

If you have already applied finish, you can also do the same process with what ever finish you used. Again, I think an air brush works best for this. Be sure to use a compatible dye.

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LesB

2122 posts in 3858 days


#8 posted 05-07-2019 11:12 PM

I think the best fix, if it is really important, is to apply an adhesive backed oak veneer over the section and stain it.

-- Les B, Oregon

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bygrace

198 posts in 2384 days


#9 posted 05-10-2019 12:53 AM

Thanks to everyone for your input. Bilyo, i have two coats of danish oil on it. I experimentd on the back panel a little. I tried applying more stain, but that didnt work. I also tried some danish oil with a medium walnut tint and that didnt seem to do much either. Can I add some transtint to danish oil?

-- Andy, Waxahachie, Tx.

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CWWoodworking

528 posts in 594 days


#10 posted 05-10-2019 01:33 AM


Can I add some transtint to danish oil?

- bygrace

No. Trans tint does not mix with oil based stuff.

Water, alcohol, laquer yes. Oil no.

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CWWoodworking

528 posts in 594 days


#11 posted 05-10-2019 01:35 AM

They do make oil based dyes. I thought they were a PITA the one time I used them.

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OSU55

2356 posts in 2405 days


#12 posted 05-10-2019 01:55 AM

You probably wont do much using oil based dyes in do or poly etc. the wood is fairly well sealed. Best to use shellac and transtint for a toner, best sprayed. Any color dewaxed shellac will work, the transtint provides the color. The color needs to match, but make the toner weak in intensity so that each pass adds more intensity until it matches. You may need to put some toner on the entire piece to look right. I would use only a 1/2 # cut so that it doesnt fill the grain too much in areas that need more color.

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Rich

4541 posts in 1005 days


#13 posted 05-10-2019 02:15 AM


Best to use shellac and transtint for a toner, best sprayed.

- OSU55

Listen to OSU55. He knows what he’s talking about. I think it’d be best to seal off the surface before you start though.

I use lacquer as a topcoat. A benefit of it is that I can go over the top of it and do toning and touch ups with shellac and TransTint. Because denatured alcohol is the solvent for shellac but doesn’t affect lacquer, it allows you to do all sorts of things. If you really screw it up, you can wipe it clean and start over. You can also use the DNA to blend areas or lighten them without affecting the base finish of lacquer. That feature will help you blend and hide that line between the two shades.

Also, it allows you to do it in phases. If you get close to the look you’re going for and want to lock it down before continuing, you can put down a layer of lacquer, wait for it to cure (which doesn’t take long) and then continue on with the shellac.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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OSU55

2356 posts in 2405 days


#14 posted 05-11-2019 02:01 AM

Rich – why use shellac on top of lacquer? Transtint mixes with lacquer. Ive just tinted the lacquer when Ive used it.

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Rich

4541 posts in 1005 days


#15 posted 05-11-2019 04:36 AM


Rich – why use shellac on top of lacquer? Transtint mixes with lacquer. Ive just tinted the lacquer when Ive used it.

- OSU55

He could surely use tinted lacquer. But since it would amalgamate with the existing lacquer, he’d need to get it right first time.

Using tinted shellac over the lacquer makes it erasable. Say you have a lacquer base (which I always do), then you can mix your tints with shellac and lay them down. If you don’t like the result, you can wipe it off with DNA and leave the lacquer base. You can also use DNA to blend the colors without affecting the base.

Mohawk Blendal powders are what I usually use, but for the OP’s situation, I’d go with TransTint because it’s more translucent and you can thin it down and layer it until you get the result you want.

I would love a chance to tackle the OP’s plywood issue. I’m confident I could even it out.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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