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How old is everyone here? Also how long have you been at it?

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Forum topic by Boochiee posted 05-02-2019 03:42 PM 1504 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Boochiee

28 posts in 95 days


05-02-2019 03:42 PM

I’d love to see what the average age is for most of the LJ’s and see how long everyone has been at this beautiful hobby/skill/craft. Any experiences you’d like to share or any tips at basic things that I may not know about would be super awesome to hear!

I am 28, I just started woodworking last November/December of 2018 and have mostly been building up my shop with tools / building shop projects to get ready for making more intricate and advanced projects. One of my main and biggest goals would be to build a built-in bookshelf for my wife around the fireplace from one end of the wall to the other and completely surround the fireplace. I was hoping to have this project started in the summer time! My work space is a 2 car garage. I’ve been watching multiple videos on how-to and safety precautions daily ever since I started. This has become a HUGE passion for me and I am hoping to become a master craftsman in my later days. I live in a north western ‘burb of Chicago.

I do work full time and have a growing family (7 month old and possibly more in the future!) so unfortunately I am a weekend warrior and do not have as much time as I would like to dive into this. In the future I do hope to be able to spend more time in the shop if I am able to make any profit off of it. The main thing is I absolutely love to do it and if I was able to sustain an income with it, that would be the dream to do it for a living.

So let’s hear about you guys! How you got started in all of this, how long it’s been going on and so forth.


36 replies so far

View pottz's profile

pottz

5037 posts in 1348 days


#1 posted 05-02-2019 03:51 PM

ok im 59 and got started with my grandpa and dad who were both good at wood working when i was about 6,from their i just kept watching and learning my entire life to the point im at now.woodworking really got serious for me about 27 yrs ago when i bought my first house and allowed me to stretch a dollar into 5.once the house was done being added and remodeled then i began building furnniture for family and good friends.now woodworking is something im really passionate about and working at doing more advanced higher level work.i hope you enjoy the journey as much as i have.welcome to lumber jocks.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11503 posts in 3793 days


#2 posted 05-02-2019 04:00 PM

78 years young. Been making saw dust and kindling for 50 years. Hobbyist only. Hope to get good at it someday.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2633 posts in 938 days


#3 posted 05-02-2019 04:08 PM

I’m 64, born September 1954.

Started woodworking with my dad, and his Brother in 1960. Stood around and watched for a few years before that, listening to a running dialog of what they were doing, and more importantly why.

I made my living with tools from 15, till I was 27. Was an apprentice, then Journeyman woodworker, carpenter, trim carpenter. Also during that time I worked for Sears and Roebuck part time for about 10 years. I went to college between 26 and 29. During that time I worked about 30 to 40 hours a week for ShopSmith,. selling woodworking tools, specifically the MK-V, and all of her accessories.

I became a Registered Nurse when I was 29, and worked in that field full time until last year, however the entire time I also ran a contracting company for new homes, home repair, cabinets, and whatever the shop could do. I quit that about 9 to 10 years ago. Kind of just tapered off, spent more time relaxing. I had worked most of 18 hours a day for most of my life. Sleep??? I’ll sleep plenty when I am dead…. Sometimes I feel like I have arrived.

There was about 20 years in the middle when I hardly missed an auction if tools were to be sold, and I bought, traded, and flipped tools for most of that time, and still do a bit of that, just nowhere near the amount that I used to.

Today I have a nice 24×32 shop, inside a 32 X 48 barnarage, pretty well equipped, have what I want anyhow. The Wife calls it The Garage Mahal. Hardly ever keep anything, either sell it, or gift it. Wife likes the shop too, but she is a basket weaver 1st. We like to share time together. Lord knows I wasn’t home much for the start of our 38 year marriage.

Welcome, and hope you have fun woodworking. It keeps a fella off the streets. You hardly ever hear about a mad dog killer woodworker, gone nutz and sawing people to death….

-- Think safe, be safe

View jdmaher's profile

jdmaher

450 posts in 2943 days


#4 posted 05-02-2019 04:09 PM

66.

Did some furniture and other refurbishing as a teenager, and helped a more serious uncle with his furniture projects.

Home maintenance DIY carpentry started about 40 years ago.

Started more serious simple “furniture” 30 years ago and still at it.

Most important advice for a beginner: don’t spend too much money! Buy only what you absolutely need for the CURRENT project, and finish that project before you start a new one.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1365 posts in 1180 days


#5 posted 05-02-2019 04:12 PM

I am 64. I sold my first woodworking project at the age of 21. I was strictly a hobbyist before that.

View Boochiee's profile

Boochiee

28 posts in 95 days


#6 posted 05-02-2019 04:34 PM



ok im 59 and got started with my grandpa and dad who were both good at wood working when i was about 6,from their i just kept watching and learning my entire life to the point im at now.woodworking really got serious for me about 27 yrs ago when i bought my first house and allowed me to stretch a dollar into 5.once the house was done being added and remodeled then i began building furnniture for family and good friends.now woodworking is something im really passionate about and working at doing more advanced higher level work.i hope you enjoy the journey as much as i have.welcome to lumber jocks.

- pottz

Awesome! My brother is a carpenter and a lot of my family are also in the business. My uncle is a contractor and does some huge projects. He’s helped me a ton in the past with everything and I would say he is what inspired me into starting this. My brother and I built my first work bench back in October and that was really fun so I kept buying more and more stuff and doing more workshop projects.

View Boochiee's profile

Boochiee

28 posts in 95 days


#7 posted 05-02-2019 04:42 PM



66.

Did some furniture and other refurbishing as a teenager, and helped a more serious uncle with his furniture projects.

Home maintenance DIY carpentry started about 40 years ago.

Started more serious simple “furniture” 30 years ago and still at it.

Most important advice for a beginner: don t spend too much money! Buy only what you absolutely need for the CURRENT project, and finish that project before you start a new one.

- jdmaher

Thanks for the tip! I am trying to stick to that now (after I spent probably 3 grand on power tools / miscellaneous stuff).

And wow thanks for the replies so far everyone! Love hearing about it all.

View OleGrump's profile

OleGrump

249 posts in 709 days


#8 posted 05-02-2019 05:27 PM

I’m 58. Grew up playing in Pop-pop’s cabinet shop, learning some things here and there and began working on small projects with him at 11. I still have a table top type wheelbarrow I made at that age. (For you young’uns, these were popular decorative items used for holding mixed nuts, etc. back in them thar days)
I’ve made all kinds of things over the years, from houses for antique 0 gauge toy trains to an over-sized Halloween coffin. A young lady talked me into taking on that last project for her. (I did get to measure her to make sure it would fit her, and allow room for a costume…. heh heh heh….)
I enjoy working with a combination of hand tools and power equipment, as the mood and/or need strikes. Not only can one sometimes do a small job faster with a hand tool (not having to set up a machine), it is therapeutic for one’s mind and soul. It’s also a Hell of a lot quieter, if you happen to be working at some odd hour that would make the neighbors complain. Anyway, it’s good to be versatile with BOTH methods of working wood.

-- OleGrump

View mudflap4869's profile

mudflap4869

1925 posts in 1823 days


#9 posted 05-02-2019 06:27 PM

Born in April of 1948 so I must be at least 17 by now. I started helping grandpa when I was 10. He worked timber and built with what he cut. He didn’t have electric on the farm at the time, so all the work was with hand tools. Crosscut to fell the trees and mules to drag them to the work site. Broad axes, Adzes, Breast augers, Froes, Slicks, and scads of other little boy killer hand tools. Lots of post and beam work cutting tenons and boring peg holes to keep a boy occupied during the summer. I went from there to helping dad build houses. Guess who was tasked with the trim work. Got bored and in 69 went in the ARMY for 23 years.
After retirement I became a mister fix-it for several years, but learned to refuse to work for bird-feed. Now I have a 30×40 shop that my wife has about taken over as she learns more about the joy of woodworking. Actually she does more rusty tool collecting than making things. I created a monster by teaching woodworking, she has learned and gained more talent in the last six years than I have in a lifetime.

-- Still trying to master kindling making

View bucolic's profile

bucolic

10 posts in 27 days


#10 posted 05-02-2019 06:38 PM

I’m 56. My Dad always was doing things himself or working alongside those he hired. I lost a lot of his wrenches as a young kid! Used to make him so mad now I understand why. Your tools become part of you. I thank him for getting me on the road to doing things myself. I still have the book he bought to learn how to do repairs yourself. Readers Digest Do It Yourself Manual! Many a day tearing apart a faucet with my Dad while he read from this book to get it back together!

-- Brian, Amatuer Woodworker Hack

View Boochiee's profile

Boochiee

28 posts in 95 days


#11 posted 05-02-2019 07:16 PM

Some great stories! I hope to pass my knowledge off to my children some day and have another hand in the shop. My wife has no interest in it and I wish I had someone else to work with!

View ocean's profile

ocean

158 posts in 1197 days


#12 posted 05-02-2019 07:26 PM

I’m 65. I got my chance as a teenager to learn some skills with my dad, when he retired and started making solid hardwood furniture for the house. It was eye opening to watch hardwood log being unloaded off the barges at the docks in Pensacola, FL. Lumber imported was located right along the bayou where the barges were flooded to sink and release the logs. Had the opportunity to tag along with the millwright and see 4-8 foot logs 60-80 feet long, sawed into 8/4 slabs, 6×6 timbers, or custom cut to your spec.
My dad purchased a number of pieces over the course of a number of years. His passion was British Campaign Furniture. He made around 5 pieces – solid mahogany. I cherish 2 of those pieces in my house today. That is where I learned a lot skills with my dad. I my only wish is that I had half the skills my dad than, but I’m trying to improve with each piece I build. Also my budget is a little more restrained than my dad. Mostly being the cost deference in price from than until now. It blows my mind how cheap it was back then. One still rings in my head 4’x12’x 8/4 $80 bucks each., he bought two that day. My wish these days is room to swing a board around in my shop with out hitting something (1 car garage). Still learning new skills and I guess I always will.

-- Bob, FL Keys

View Boochiee's profile

Boochiee

28 posts in 95 days


#13 posted 05-02-2019 09:27 PM



I m 65. I got my chance as a teenager to learn some skills with my dad, when he retired and started making solid hardwood furniture for the house. It was eye opening to watch hardwood log being unloaded off the barges at the docks in Pensacola, FL. Lumber imported was located right along the bayou where the barges were flooded to sink and release the logs. Had the opportunity to tag along with the millwright and see 4-8 foot logs 60-80 feet long, sawed into 8/4 slabs, 6×6 timbers, or custom cut to your spec.
My dad purchased a number of pieces over the course of a number of years. His passion was British Campaign Furniture. He made around 5 pieces – solid mahogany. I cherish 2 of those pieces in my house today. That is where I learned a lot skills with my dad. I my only wish is that I had half the skills my dad than, but I m trying to improve with each piece I build. Also my budget is a little more restrained than my dad. Mostly being the cost deference in price from than until now. It blows my mind how cheap it was back then. One still rings in my head 4×12 x 8/4 $80 bucks each., he bought two that day. My wish these days is room to swing a board around in my shop with out hitting something (1 car garage). Still learning new skills and I guess I always will.

- ocean

Hot dang that must have been HEAVY. One sheet of 3/4 ply is pretty heavy but that’s a whole different level! haha

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

22537 posts in 3469 days


#14 posted 05-08-2019 02:55 AM

We are all young at heart. I’m 73 and have been on here for 9.455 years ( 3451 days) When I stumbled on Lumberjocks, there were 13,000 members…............now there are over 280,000 …...........because it is the best woodworking site on the Internet!!!!!!!!!!! I’m a toolmaker by trade and never worked with wood much until I retired. Now I can make my woodworking tools.

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View mel52's profile

mel52

814 posts in 629 days


#15 posted 05-08-2019 04:22 AM

Will be 67 this summer. Had an uncle that had a construction company when I was growing up. He let me hang around and help on what I could. Kind of got into my blood and have been working in wood one way or the other since then both as a hobby and for a living years ago. Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

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