LumberJocks

Tablesaw Jig Safety Q

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by unclearthur posted 05-02-2019 05:34 AM 610 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View unclearthur's profile

unclearthur

383 posts in 2868 days


05-02-2019 05:34 AM

If you go about 4 minutes into this Fine Woodworking Video, the presenter uses a tall fence with a large rabbet in it to cut a bevel on boards held vertically, with the blade basically imbeded between the board and the fence:

He makes clear that you should only do this if the rabbet in the fence is large enough that the offcut cannot get trapped between the fence and blade.

It seems to me that, even if the offcut is thinner than the rabbet, you can still get kickback if the offcut rotates and jams between the fence and blade. Maybe not a big deal because the offcuts are so thin?

Any thoughts? Safe or not?

Other than the offcut issue, it definitely feels safer than doing the bevel with the board between the fence and the blade, and the blade exposed.


4 replies so far

View Delete's profile

Delete

439 posts in 1452 days


#1 posted 05-02-2019 12:07 PM

For such a severe bevel angle it is probably the best way to do it on the table saw. The rabbet is a good idea for extra clearance for the cut off. The cut is across the grain so if the off-cut does rotate and contact the blade it will break it up (make sure your safety glasses or face shields are on). A different story if the cut was with the grain, in which case extra care to stand out of the way of that thin spear, wood be wise, in case it comes shooting out.

Not to many other alternatives, the band saw, but it would require further clean up, a hand plane, take longer and more skill, the router, require special set-up, etc.

View SMP's profile

SMP

3957 posts in 985 days


#2 posted 05-02-2019 12:56 PM

Safety depends on many factors. Do you have a zero clearance insert? Do you have featherboards.? Endcuts clean and square? I find when doing things like this that the minor detail that gets overlooked and unexpectedly “catches” and makes you readjust mid cut is what usually compromises safety. I personally always stay out of the line of fire of kickback always.

View unclearthur's profile

unclearthur

383 posts in 2868 days


#3 posted 05-03-2019 04:05 AM



Safety depends on many factors. Do you have a zero clearance insert? Do you have featherboards.? Endcuts clean and square? I find when doing things like this that the minor detail that gets overlooked and unexpectedly “catches” and makes you readjust mid cut is what usually compromises safety. I personally always stay out of the line of fire of kickback always.

- SMP


But I guess my question is, even with a zero clearance insert, square ends and a featherboard, is this cut inherently risky because the cut-off is loose and sitting between the fence and the blade – basically the thing we avoid by not using the fence and miter gauge at the same time? Or is the cut off (a wedge less than 1/4” thick at the most) just too small to worry about?

View theart's profile

theart

233 posts in 1634 days


#4 posted 05-03-2019 12:55 PM

It seems safe. This is sort of like using the miter gauge with a stop block on the fence. If I really wanted to be sure I’d make the cut in a few passes so there is no offcut.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com