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Forum topic by Innovator posted 04-28-2019 08:03 PM 426 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Innovator

3589 posts in 3832 days


04-28-2019 08:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plywood tablesaw sled grain orientation jig question

I am making my table saw sled top from a full 3/4” sanded ply. The top will be 36” wide and 30” deep.

My question is does the orientation of the plywood matter, in other words should the outer grain run parallel to blade or 90 degrees of it?

Thanks

-- Whether You Think You Can or You Think You Can't, YOU ARE RIGHT!!!


9 replies so far

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1325 posts in 859 days


#1 posted 04-28-2019 08:43 PM

If you have a piece of that ply that you could lay down on the table saw and slide back and forth, then turn 90º and slide again, seems that would answer your question. Personally can’t see it making enough difference which direction it is.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1396 posts in 1235 days


#2 posted 04-28-2019 08:50 PM

The plywood will work fine with either grain direction. However, I would encourage you to rethink the use of 3/4” plywood. It makes for a very heavy and hard to handle sled and you lose more cutting depth than is necessary. I have built several sleds for several different saws and found that 1/2” works better. I would also choose the lightest plywood with sufficient strength and quality to work. I used Birch. Yet another suggestion is to build more than one size sled to accommodate different size work pieces. I am planning on building an ultra light sled using 1/4” material for cross cutting small pieces.

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Innovator

3589 posts in 3832 days


#3 posted 04-28-2019 08:54 PM

Thanks for the feedback, I have a smaller unit already, I am making this one for panels I am making for a project so the 3/4” seems to work best (Besides I got it free) I should be fine with the depth since the panels are only 3/4”


The plywood will work fine with either grain direction. However, I would encourage you to rethink the use of 3/4” plywood. It makes for a very heavy and hard to handle sled and you lose more cutting depth than is necessary. I have built several sleds for several different saws and found that 1/2” works better. I would also choose the lightest plywood with sufficient strength and quality to work. I used Birch. Yet another suggestion is to build more than one size sled to accommodate different size work pieces. I am planning on building an ultra light sled using 1/4” material for cross cutting small pieces.

- ArtMann


-- Whether You Think You Can or You Think You Can't, YOU ARE RIGHT!!!

View zzzzdoc's profile

zzzzdoc

553 posts in 3422 days


#4 posted 04-28-2019 10:16 PM

I have a large one built out of 3/4” MDF. It’s a back killer to lift it.

I actually put a hoist on the ceiling and lift it up and store it hanging from the hoist. It’s way too heavy and large to move around.

I’d think the 1/2” advice is very good. IMHO.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1177 posts in 325 days


#5 posted 04-28-2019 11:55 PM



The plywood will work fine with either grain direction. However, I would encourage you to rethink the use of 3/4” plywood. It makes for a very heavy and hard to handle sled and you lose more cutting depth than is necessary. I have built several sleds for several different saws and found that 1/2” works better. I would also choose the lightest plywood with sufficient strength and quality to work. I used Birch. Yet another suggestion is to build more than one size sled to accommodate different size work pieces. I am planning on building an ultra light sled using 1/4” material for cross cutting small pieces.

- ArtMann

I’ve also found that 1/2” birch seems to stay “flatter” than inexpensive “whitewood” 3/4 ply, at least in my shop.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3539 posts in 1806 days


#6 posted 04-29-2019 01:39 AM

Sand it to an extra fine grit and put a slippery finish (poly for example) on it and it won’t matter. At little paste wax will help too.

+1 on the 1/2” ply. I wouldn’t want to lose 1/4” of cutting depth.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Innovator's profile

Innovator

3589 posts in 3832 days


#7 posted 04-29-2019 10:25 AM

Thanks, I appreciate the info
Innovator


Sand it to an extra fine grit and put a slippery finish (poly for example) on it and it won t matter. At little paste wax will help too.

+1 on the 1/2” ply. I wouldn t want to lose 1/4” of cutting depth.

- Lazyman


-- Whether You Think You Can or You Think You Can't, YOU ARE RIGHT!!!

View Innovator's profile

Innovator

3589 posts in 3832 days


#8 posted 04-29-2019 10:26 AM

Thanks for the feedback


I have a large one built out of 3/4” MDF. It s a back killer to lift it.

I actually put a hoist on the ceiling and lift it up and store it hanging from the hoist. It s way too heavy and large to move around.

I d think the 1/2” advice is very good. IMHO.

- zzzzdoc


-- Whether You Think You Can or You Think You Can't, YOU ARE RIGHT!!!

View Innovator's profile

Innovator

3589 posts in 3832 days


#9 posted 04-29-2019 10:28 AM

Thanks ArtMann


The plywood will work fine with either grain direction. However, I would encourage you to rethink the use of 3/4” plywood. It makes for a very heavy and hard to handle sled and you lose more cutting depth than is necessary. I have built several sleds for several different saws and found that 1/2” works better. I would also choose the lightest plywood with sufficient strength and quality to work. I used Birch. Yet another suggestion is to build more than one size sled to accommodate different size work pieces. I am planning on building an ultra light sled using 1/4” material for cross cutting small pieces.

- ArtMann


-- Whether You Think You Can or You Think You Can't, YOU ARE RIGHT!!!

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