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My last hope - What would cause my board to rock side to side after jointing?

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Forum topic by tcaz posted 04-27-2019 03:04 AM 2603 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tcaz

6 posts in 255 days


04-27-2019 03:04 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer tuning help maintenance jointer knives

Issue: After running stock through my 6” Jet (dovetail ways), it comes out with an ever so slight rock along the width of jointed side of the board. You can press down on either side of the stock and both sides reveal a sliver of a gap along the length it. The stock is flat length wise, as in no snipe, bowing, etc. It’s noticeable but tolerable for what I’ve been making lately. However, its hindering me from moving forward with larger projects where square is a necessity.I’m getting by but tired of just getting by.

Rant: I’m at my wits end here… I’ve probably put in a total of 25-30 hours of labor in the past two months to try and get it tuned. I think I’ve tried every variation of search keywords, looked through various forums, and read many articles on jointer tuneup. I even checked out a book at my library on machine calibration!

The jointer used to work great, and I was able to operate normally, switch knives with no issues, achieve good results. Somewhere along the way it went awry. I’ve tried damn near everything- check tables for parallelism, ensure outfeed in line with cutterhead and knives in line with outfeed, purchased new knives, tried jigs and straight edge method for setting knives, adjusted jibs on both out/in feed tables, read Jet manuals and other jointer manufactures, jointing a number of different species and lengths of stock, using proper technique as well as variations. The works.

I haven’t found many forum topics regarding a width wide rock (is there a proper name for this?). I know my knives are aligned with the outfeed table. The only thing I can think of is something to do with the infeed table being higher or lower in one spot? I don’t know. Is there a trick to adjusting the jibs on dovetail ways? An order of operation for tightening them or is it trial and error?

Any and all help would be greatly appreciated!


13 replies so far

View SMP's profile

SMP

1199 posts in 327 days


#1 posted 04-27-2019 03:20 AM

Sounds like twist. Do you have winding sticks?

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

410 posts in 2666 days


#2 posted 04-27-2019 03:43 AM

Twist or not shouldn’t the jointer take it out? Sorry no help from me, I’ve not had the best of luck with mine either..

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View CarlosInTheSticks's profile

CarlosInTheSticks

411 posts in 794 days


#3 posted 04-27-2019 04:07 AM

Thats a tough one, sounds like you have checked everything including new blades and different woods which might indicate moisture problems or tension wood.

You said you checked parallelism, I assume you checked that with the infeed table raised to the same plane as the outfeed table. There are a couple of ways to do this but the easiest way is to repeat that test check that parallelism is accurate in 3 or 4 locations along the length of both beds to insure you have no warp defects in the bed, take a accurate straight edge and slowly and lightly scrape it along the full length of both beds just to insure you don’t have a small high spot you missed, you probably have checked that already. Now drop the infeed table a very small amount maybe 1/64 th or a little more, take 5 or 6 passes. Now drop the infeed table to say 1/8” and take a pass or two with a new board. If your problem is back on this board and not present in the first board, your dove tale ways may be damaged or improperly adjusted. You can remove the infeed table and inspect the ways, they may be scored with high spots or otherwise damaged from trying to adjust them when they are locked down. You should be able to clean these up with fine file and scraper.

If this is not it, then you got me stumped too.

Good Luck

-- "There are no utopias, chaos theory reigns, anyone who says different is selling you something"

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2220 days


#4 posted 04-27-2019 04:24 AM

Dovetail jointers like the jet don’t have any table adjustments.
The gibs are for adjusting the table tightness for raising and lowering.
Most jointer problems are with knife height to the outfeed.

-- Aj

View CarlosInTheSticks's profile

CarlosInTheSticks

411 posts in 794 days


#5 posted 04-27-2019 04:36 AM

Aj2 I think you should reveiw what you just said, when you tighten a table it is automatically adjusted to the plane of the dovetail ways, that is not just common to Jet it is common to all jointers of that design. If you don’t tighten them properly you can nock the table out a bit affecting parallelism.

Knife height is the most common problem it is also the easiest to correct I think tcaz is beyond that.

-- "There are no utopias, chaos theory reigns, anyone who says different is selling you something"

View tcaz's profile

tcaz

6 posts in 255 days


#6 posted 04-27-2019 04:50 AM

Appreciate the detailed response. I have adjusted and checked for parallelism multiple times with both a 38” and 50” straight edge. I have noticed this though- When I extend the straight edge over the infeed and use my feeler gauges, there’s a “bump”, for lack of better words, thats ~2×3-5”. It starts on the cutterhead side and goes back 3-5” to the end of the infeed table. As if stock has worn down the table on either side, but this jointer hasn’t seen enough use for that. Or atleast I think. The “bump” is so small when measuring, I find it to be insignificant. As I mentioned in OP, the jointer didn’t give me problems a year ago. /sigh

I’ll give your test a try tomorrow sometimes. I know the dovetail ways do have some indentions and damage to them. Can you tell me how damaged dt ways affect the performance exactly? Whats the proper way to adjust them? Sorry, I’m not too informed on them.

I still got some gas in the tank. I’ma do what it takes to get this fixed! Thanks!


Thats a tough one, sounds like you have checked everything including new blades and different woods which might indicate moisture problems or tension wood.

You said you checked parallelism, I assume you checked that with the infeed table raised to the same plane as the outfeed table. There are a couple of ways to do this but the easiest way is to repeat that test check that parallelism is accurate in 3 or 4 locations along the length of both beds to insure you have no warp defects in the bed, take a accurate straight edge and slowly and lightly scrape it along the full length of both beds just to insure you don t have a small high spot you missed, you probably have checked that already. Now drop the infeed table a very small amount maybe 1/64 th or a little more, take 5 or 6 passes. Now drop the infeed table to say 1/8” and take a pass or two with a new board. If your problem is back on this board and not present in the first board, your dove tale ways may be damaged or improperly adjusted. You can remove the infeed table and inspect the ways, they may be scored with high spots or otherwise damaged from trying to adjust them when they are locked down. You should be able to clean these up with fine file and scraper.

If this is not it, then you got me stumped too.

Good Luck

- Carlos510

View CarlosInTheSticks's profile

CarlosInTheSticks

411 posts in 794 days


#7 posted 04-27-2019 05:04 AM

Acaz parallelism also means across the width of the bed, as a previous poster mentioned winding sticks is what you need to check this in 3 or 4 locations. I could be wrong sounds like you only checked the length. That bump would certainly do it check all your edges for high spots including the edges of both tables at the cutter head, you may have bumped an edge at some time and never noticed till the problem turned up, recheck your knives.

-- "There are no utopias, chaos theory reigns, anyone who says different is selling you something"

View tcaz's profile

tcaz

6 posts in 255 days


#8 posted 04-27-2019 05:35 AM

Correction on previous reply. The gibs show signs of damage, not the ways themselves.


Appreciate the detailed response. I have adjusted and checked for parallelism multiple times with both a 38” and 50” straight edge. I have noticed this though- When I extend the straight edge over the infeed and use my feeler gauges, there s a “bump”, for lack of better words, thats ~2×3-5”. It starts on the cutterhead side and goes back 3-5” to the end of the infeed table. As if stock has worn down the table on either side, but this jointer hasn t seen enough use for that. Or atleast I think. The “bump” is so small when measuring, I find it to be insignificant. As I mentioned in OP, the jointer didn t give me problems a year ago. /sigh

I ll give your test a try tomorrow sometimes. I know the dovetail ways do have some indentions and damage to them. Can you tell me how damaged dt ways affect the performance exactly? Whats the proper way to adjust them? Sorry, I m not too informed on them.

I still got some gas in the tank. I ma do what it takes to get this fixed! Thanks!

Thats a tough one, sounds like you have checked everything including new blades and different woods which might indicate moisture problems or tension wood.

You said you checked parallelism, I assume you checked that with the infeed table raised to the same plane as the outfeed table. There are a couple of ways to do this but the easiest way is to repeat that test check that parallelism is accurate in 3 or 4 locations along the length of both beds to insure you have no warp defects in the bed, take a accurate straight edge and slowly and lightly scrape it along the full length of both beds just to insure you don t have a small high spot you missed, you probably have checked that already. Now drop the infeed table a very small amount maybe 1/64 th or a little more, take 5 or 6 passes. Now drop the infeed table to say 1/8” and take a pass or two with a new board. If your problem is back on this board and not present in the first board, your dove tale ways may be damaged or improperly adjusted. You can remove the infeed table and inspect the ways, they may be scored with high spots or otherwise damaged from trying to adjust them when they are locked down. You should be able to clean these up with fine file and scraper.

If this is not it, then you got me stumped too.

Good Luck

- Carlos510

- tcaz


View CarlosInTheSticks's profile

CarlosInTheSticks

411 posts in 794 days


#9 posted 04-27-2019 08:24 AM

The gibs should be easy enough to repair if not they are easily replaced. When you lower the infeed table if the ways are less than smooth, it will shift the table alignment a bit, if your gibs are not evenly snugged up they can do the same. If you have a front lock, back it out. When adjusting the gibs center the table on the ways, with the gibs in place adjust the center screw until you start to feel resistance then adjust the two outside screws (if you have 3 adjustment screws) until you feel resistance. Continue to give each screw a half turn at a time starting with the center screw until they are firm but not tight. Tighten the locks and try the table you want the table adjustment firm but not tight or loose, adjust the screws 1/8th of a turn at a time if required for your final adjustment.

If your table is shifting it could take out a little more on one side as you feed the board through causing a slight rock. Now I have never had that problem myself so some of this is theorizing on my part, don’t shoot me if that is not the problem, just trying to help.

-- "There are no utopias, chaos theory reigns, anyone who says different is selling you something"

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

258 posts in 881 days


#10 posted 04-27-2019 10:49 AM

My guess is that you have a blade that isn’t straight with the others cutting an ever so shallow “V”.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1581 posts in 2152 days


#11 posted 04-27-2019 02:18 PM

So far, all comments are about the settings of the machine. No one has asked about the wood you were jointing.

Before the questions, here is a little bit of wisdom I’ve witnessed over the years. We should all know that ALL Woods is still alive even years after being processed. It will move when it feels like it. It also has some stress that when being cut, it will let you know by twisting, bowing, pinching your saw, and giving you grief while working it.

Here are the questions. How long was the piece you were running through your jointer? Did it already have a twist before you attempted jointing? Was it rough sawn?

Just yesterday, I had a piece of maple 8/4×12” wide 54” long. It had a twist when a straight edge was laid on across it on apposing corners amounted to a 3/8” gap. I only needed 24” of it, so I cut it. I have only a 6” jointer, so I ripped the board into 3 pieces all about 4” wide. Took it to my jointer, and flattened it in 3 passes set on 1/16” cut. After the face was flat, I then jointed the edge. If the knives weren’t as dull as they are I would have done it in one pass.

The infeed table is long enough to have the board lay on the whole surface. I held it down at the rear of the piece and pushed it through. When I was about 6” past the knives, I then used my other hand to help hold it until it made a full pass. After the third pass, all was good. When all 3 pieces were flat, I took it over to my table saw and cleaned it up to the thickness I needed. The boards stayed flat after cutting. ............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2220 days


#12 posted 04-27-2019 03:53 PM

Carlos was right to correct my post. If the Op messed with those gibs you’ll throw the tables off.
Now the op will have to put on his thinking cap to get them back.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View coxhaus's profile

coxhaus

121 posts in 1316 days


#13 posted 04-27-2019 05:40 PM

I posted a link with me setting up my Delta 6 inch jointer on a sister site. My jointer cuts very smooth. So smooth I did not have to sand the veneers I was cutting. My wife has a large dresser which she got some bugs in. I told her I would line her 10 dresser drawers. I shaved 1/8 inch veneers off of a cedar board using my bandsaw. The cut was too rough for her and she wanted me to sand them. What a pain sanding veneer. So I figured if I jointed the board and then shaved it she was happy and I did not have to sand the veneers. So I jointed the board and veneered it for each cut. I used the jointed board right side up. My only other issue was to cut the veneers to size. I used a 8 inch blade on my Unisaw with a lot of teeth. It worked much better than using a 10 inch blade which is a much wider blade.

https://www.routerforums.com/tools-woodworking/104362-jointer-blades-just-got-easier.html

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