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Help Fixing Damage to Boards While Planing

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Forum topic by SSotolongo posted 04-25-2019 12:58 PM 746 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SSotolongo

64 posts in 476 days


04-25-2019 12:58 PM

In planing the boards I edged glued, I caused the damage you see in the two pictures below. I want to know if they are repairable? If so, how? This is my first real attempt at gluing and planing boards. This for a table that’s going into our bedroom, so no one else will see the imperfections and there will be stuff on top that will probably cover it, but I know its there’d it bother me. Thank you.


15 replies so far

View Robert's profile

Robert

3751 posts in 2259 days


#1 posted 04-25-2019 01:03 PM

The upper pic looks like tear out. The lower one looks like a dent.

Dents can usually be dealt with using a wet rag and apply a hot iron.

Tear out is whole ‘nother story. In a soft wood like pine with minimal tear out, try the above mentioned trick, but don’t expect much. Sorry.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

12186 posts in 4207 days


#2 posted 04-25-2019 02:45 PM

Butterfly patch, or colored epoxy, or the simplest, Timbermate wood filler. Available at most lumber yards or hardware stores. Good stuff.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Rich's profile

Rich

5629 posts in 1368 days


#3 posted 04-25-2019 03:09 PM

I agree with Robert about the type of damage. The steam method will probably remove most or all of the dent. However it won’t help the tear out. That needs to be filled. I’d go with Timbermate. Get the Maple/Beech/Pine color and it’ll match pretty well. Is this going to be painted? If so, just filling will do. If not, I’d get a brown art pencil or even a crayon that’s close to the darker grain color and put the grain back.

Edit: I was typing when Gene posted his Timbermate suggestion.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1112 posts in 1881 days


#4 posted 04-26-2019 12:43 AM

If you are going to put a clear finish (or better, an amber finish) on it, try clear epoxy to fill the tear-out. I agree with putting water on the dent. The water will make the dent swell and rise back up. It may then require sanding smooth. I have good results with just a drop of water. Let it set and dry and a second application may be needed. You may not need the iron but it may work faster.

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

285 posts in 1238 days


#5 posted 04-26-2019 01:15 AM

I have had good luck with damage like this by spreading a little glue over the damage when sanding. The dust from the sander will adhere to the glue and fill in the hole nicely. If the hole is deep it may take a couple of applications of a thin coat if glue and re-sanding. The glue dries almost instantly so you don’t have to wait long to continue on. You can try that on a scrap before to see how it works for you.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13401 posts in 3159 days


#6 posted 04-26-2019 02:34 AM

Agree with the Timbermate suggestion. I used it for the first time to fill the grain of white oak, very easy to use and blends well. If anything I prefer a darker filler.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View PeteStaehling's profile

PeteStaehling

135 posts in 1898 days


#7 posted 04-26-2019 12:00 PM

How deep is it? Do you have access to a thickness sander that will take the width of the piece? A few passes through might take care of it.

View SSotolongo's profile

SSotolongo

64 posts in 476 days


#8 posted 04-26-2019 01:33 PM



The upper pic looks like tear out. The lower one looks like a dent.

Dents can usually be dealt with using a wet rag and apply a hot iron.

Tear out is whole nother story. In a soft wood like pine with minimal tear out, try the above mentioned trick, but don t expect much. Sorry.

- Robert

I’m not sure if the bottom one is a dent now that you mention it. Will try it, just in case.

View SSotolongo's profile

SSotolongo

64 posts in 476 days


#9 posted 04-26-2019 01:35 PM



How deep is it? Do you have access to a thickness sander that will take the width of the piece? A few passes through might take care of it.

- PeteStaehling

No unfortunately not. That’s why I was looking for other solutions.

View SSotolongo's profile

SSotolongo

64 posts in 476 days


#10 posted 04-26-2019 01:36 PM



I agree with Robert about the type of damage. The steam method will probably remove most or all of the dent. However it won t help the tear out. That needs to be filled. I d go with Timbermate. Get the Maple/Beech/Pine color and it ll match pretty well. Is this going to be painted? If so, just filling will do. If not, I d get a brown art pencil or even a crayon that s close to the darker grain color and put the grain back.

Edit: I was typing when Gene posted his Timbermate suggestion.

- Rich


Not sure if it’s going to be painted or stained. Probably stain to match the furniture in the bedroom. Designing, building and functionality is me and the finishes I let the wife pick those out.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5629 posts in 1368 days


#11 posted 04-26-2019 01:56 PM


Not sure if it s going to be painted or stained. Probably stain to match the furniture in the bedroom. Designing, building and functionality is me and the finishes I let the wife pick those out.

- SSotolongo

That’s not the type of wood that takes stain well. If you just stain it, it will cause grain reversal due to the densities of the early wood and late wood. Even if you condition it to prevent that, it still tends to look pretty crappy.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1659 posts in 3628 days


#12 posted 04-26-2019 03:02 PM

If I had that happen in hard wood, I’d use an inlay kit with my router and patch it like this

Working in pine, I think it would not be worth the effort, as it’s such as soft wood and doing the removal would likely cause more tear out. AS mentioned above, pine does not stain well or look good stained, perhaps okay with a clear finish, but it’s your call. Perhaps, look at your work so far as a prototype/practice and consider going to a hard wood that you can stain and finish much more nicely.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View SSotolongo's profile

SSotolongo

64 posts in 476 days


#13 posted 04-27-2019 12:18 PM



If I had that happen in hard wood, I d use an inlay kit with my router and patch it like this
Perhaps, look at your work so far as a prototype/practice and consider going to a hard wood that you can stain and finish much more nicely.

- ChefHDAN

That’s part of what I am doing. I am a beginner, so I am working with pine to improve my technique before moving on to pricier wood.

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

352 posts in 738 days


#14 posted 04-27-2019 01:39 PM


If I had that happen in hard wood, I d use an inlay kit with my router and patch it like this

Perhaps, look at your work so far as a prototype/practice and consider going to a hard wood that you can stain and finish much more nicely.

- ChefHDAN

That s part of what I am doing. I am a beginner, so I am working with pine to improve my technique before moving on to pricier wood.

- SSotolongo

This suggestion isn’t going to help the tearout but..

Use poplar (from a real lumber yard) instead of pine. Its cheaper than everything but construction lumber and works very well with hand tools. Its also free of knots (if you buy FAS grade.) Depending on where you are it should be about $2/bd ft rough

View PossumDuck's profile

PossumDuck

6 posts in 629 days


#15 posted 04-27-2019 02:58 PM

This can be a great opportunity to develop some more skills. Pine is rather soft so you really need sharp tools to do chisel and cutting things. But you could cut out (or buy) an initial or design from a contrasting wood and inlay it. Or you could use a Forstner bit in a drill press to drill out a recess. The recess could be filled with a round piece, or it could be a receptacle for coins or keys.
Lots of cool ways to make lemonade here.

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