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Help! Bandsaw drift

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Forum topic by Horus posted 04-24-2019 02:35 PM 416 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Horus

30 posts in 31 days


04-24-2019 02:35 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw drift

I have a benchtop Ryobi 9” band saw that can’t seem to cut straight (vertcally) when redrawing 3” boards. The cut starts fine for a half inch or so then the bottom of the cut drifts left, leavening me with two wedges. I’ve confirmed square on the table, it was a bit off, but the problem persists. Have adjusted guide blocks too. It’s never parallel to the fence. I’m about a place where I make a lot more that I should on the TS and waste a Lott of good wood – and no chance of book matching.
Other than just trashing the dumb thing, any suggestions? Maybe blade tension not tight enough?


14 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1797 posts in 526 days


#1 posted 04-24-2019 03:22 PM

I would ask what kind of blade are you using and the tension.
I have the same saw under a different label and have given up
on resawing hardwoods with it.

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5202 posts in 4324 days


#2 posted 04-24-2019 04:53 PM

You didn’t say what blade you’re using. Tension, good 3 tpi blade, slow feed, etc. That’s a pretty small saw no matter what you do. Under powered?

-- [email protected]

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

293 posts in 1837 days


#3 posted 04-24-2019 05:16 PM

In addition to the questions posed by Bill and John, I would ask if you are using your fence to resaw or following a line freehand?

If you have not already, watch the Snodgrass video on youtube on setting up a bandsaw. There are those who say the he is all wrong, but I and many others follow his set up with great success.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View William Falberg's profile

William Falberg

13 posts in 1717 days


#4 posted 04-29-2019 08:12 PM

How did you “confirm square with the table”? If it was a “little bit off” it would account for a lot of wandering blade. Do a very careful job of drawing the blade’s drift angle on the table and meticulously align your fence parallel to it. OR : get the widest-set blade you can find; Timberwolf 1/2” 2 TPI blades from Suffolk have about the widest set angle I know of and should eliminate your blade drift problem. It might be slower going, you’ll leave a wider kerf, but you’ll get it cut straight.

-- http://www.falbergsaws.com

View Horus's profile

Horus

30 posts in 31 days


#5 posted 04-30-2019 09:32 PM

Thanks everyone, I think I got it figured out. My square wasn’t square. I was finally able to resaw a 14” piece of hickory with decent results. Now if I could just figure out how to get the upper guide to allow more than 3-1/4” height (board width). The machine was designed such that that is the physical limit of the rise of the glide block.
That and I increased the tension well past what I considered adequate.

I received this thing as a gift – and the overall experience has left me with a ‘never again anything Ryobi’ bias.

View sgcz75b's profile

sgcz75b

46 posts in 124 days


#6 posted 04-30-2019 10:52 PM


I received this thing as a gift – and the overall experience has left me with a never again anything Ryobi bias.

- Horus

Your bias might be misplaced. Knowing what your tool is capable of doing and its limitations comes before blaming the tool.

-- "One man alone can be pretty dumb sometimes, but for real bona fide stupidity, there ain't nothin' can beat teamwork." - Edward Abbey

View William Falberg's profile

William Falberg

13 posts in 1717 days


#7 posted 04-30-2019 11:30 PM

Horus: try taking the upper blade guide off altogether. If your wheels are properly crowned, the tenacity of the blade in motion will suffice to cut pretty deep if you let the teeth do the work and don’t push too hard. I do it with my low-tension portables; no reason it wouldn’t work on a cheap saw if you’re using an adequately set blade. What could go wrong? See the video where I rip a 6” manzanita stump on my website: http://www.falbergsaws.com

-- http://www.falbergsaws.com

View Horus's profile

Horus

30 posts in 31 days


#8 posted 05-01-2019 01:23 AM


Your bias might be misplaced. Knowing what your tool is capable of doing and its limitations comes before blaming the tool.

- sgcz75b

You are correct, it may be unfair to judge an entire manufacturer product line based on a cheap entry level tool.

Thanks William Falberg for the suggestion to remove the blade guides. While this would give me the clearance I need, I’m a little hesitant to do this, as thrust bearing would also have to be removed. Wouldn’t this push the blade off the upper wheel, even with minimal feed rates? I have visions of the blade breaking and becoming an instrument of death or dismemberment.

BTW, I like your website – if only I had the money and space…

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

631 posts in 1112 days


#9 posted 05-01-2019 02:09 AM

That Ryobi isn’t much of a bandsaw, but will be serviceable with a good blade. Don’t combine a marginal saw and a poor blade.

View Horus's profile

Horus

30 posts in 31 days


#10 posted 05-01-2019 02:24 AM



That Ryobi isn’t much of a bandsaw, but will be serviceable with a good blade. Don’t combine a marginal saw and a poor blade.

- Kirk650


Yeah, I know it’s more of a hobby/craft tool, but it’s what I have for now. It’s the onlybandsaw I’ve ever owned. In fairness to the saw, I’m asking it to do more than what it’s designed for. I’m using Olson blades.

View William Falberg's profile

William Falberg

13 posts in 1717 days


#11 posted 05-01-2019 03:37 AM

Put on your chain mail and attack the blade with a claw hammer like ye knights of olde. You’ll be amazed how hard it is to pull the blade out of a saw that’s properly crowned. If you’re concerned for safety, use a longer handle and stand well back when doing this. If your blade is capable of destroying your wheels you aren’t going to lose much anyway. I’ve had so many blades break while conducting these tests I don’t even flinch anymore. You learn how to use bandsaws safely when you know what they’re likely to do when the blade gets stressed, and doing it under controlled circumstances is the safest way to learn. Plus; how can you know anything about bandsaws if you never try. Like I said, you’ll be surprised. I set my saws up on solid bench pins and run them with the cover off, so you don’t have to. Notice how the blade isn’t flapping.

-- http://www.falbergsaws.com

View William Falberg's profile

William Falberg

13 posts in 1717 days


#12 posted 05-01-2019 03:47 AM

BTW: the last time I tested an Olson blade I couldn’t get it to do anything. cheap bandsaws really like Timberwolf blades. The 1/2” 2 TPI has a tighter turning radius than most 1/4” blades and can be re-set to cut a 1/2” radius plug through 18” of Doug Fir. It requires little tension to work right.

-- http://www.falbergsaws.com

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

586 posts in 274 days


#13 posted 05-01-2019 06:53 AM

recheck on blade guide settings. blade tension. a good quality blade. if you have a table saw. you could resaw on the table saw. Concern on book matching. i’ve resaw and book matched on a tablle saw before.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

631 posts in 1112 days


#14 posted 05-01-2019 02:20 PM

I agree with William Falberg, in that I am a fan of Timberwolf bandsaw blades. I had been using cheap blades for years, and when I swapped the last cheap blade out for a Timberwolf I was shocked at how well it cut. That was quite an upgr

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