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Forum topic by Bandit1538 posted 04-23-2019 05:54 PM 564 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bandit1538

1 post in 30 days


04-23-2019 05:54 PM

I live in Wa. state and I was wondering if anybody has tried to turn Cottonwood, I’ve tried to turn some wet cottonwood and the problem I’m having is that it fuzzes up real bad wet, the fibers jam up under my gouge or skew.
Pat.

-- If it ain't broke, don't fix it.


11 replies so far

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1534 posts in 2091 days


#1 posted 04-24-2019 03:09 AM

Pat, I’ve turned a bunch of Cottonwood. Dry, green and in between. Didn’t notice any problems other than warping. I was prepared for the fuzz you mentioned, but I didn’t see any….. The stuff I had was rough turned, set aside for about a month, and then finished. I used a bowl gouge, and sometimes I used a carbide tool. .......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Steve Peterson

405 posts in 3443 days


#2 posted 04-29-2019 08:31 PM

I tried turning wet cottonwood once and decided that it was not worth having to put up with the smell that was something between wet dog and manure.

-- Steve

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

533 posts in 264 days


#3 posted 04-29-2019 09:23 PM

Even woodcarvers & whittlers avoid cottonwood, but they do some amazing thins with cottonwood BARK. Native American (Hopi) carvers like to work in cottonwood ROOTS – such as this “Corn Maiden” kachina.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Nubsnstubs

1534 posts in 2091 days


#4 posted 04-30-2019 01:32 PM

I haven’t smelled anything other than a nice smell form Cottonwood. I equate the smell almost like the smell you get from Olive. Distinct, but not malodorous…... Now, wet Palo Verde will have you looking all around your shop for dog piles if you have a dog. ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Steve Peterson

405 posts in 3443 days


#5 posted 04-30-2019 04:07 PM



I haven t smelled anything other than a nice smell form Cottonwood. I equate the smell almost like the smell you get from Olive. Distinct, but not malodorous…... Now, wet Palo Verde will have you looking all around your shop for dog piles if you have a dog. ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs

The log I turned came from a tree that was growing near a swampy pond. The smell was horrible, but maybe it was unique to this particular growing condition.

-- Steve

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11492 posts in 3789 days


#6 posted 04-30-2019 04:31 PM

I did some sculpting on cottonwood that grew near a septic system. The smell was really bad. Fuzziness wasn’t a factor, though.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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AZWoody

1440 posts in 1585 days


#7 posted 04-30-2019 07:23 PM



I haven t smelled anything other than a nice smell form Cottonwood. I equate the smell almost like the smell you get from Olive. Distinct, but not malodorous…... Now, wet Palo Verde will have you looking all around your shop for dog piles if you have a dog. ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs

You never smelled anything bad from the Cottonwood you got from me? I have the smell of it. Here, everything I have come across all smells bad. When I’m done with the sawmill at the end of the day and I have handled a lot, I can smell it on my hands all night, even after a shower…

The Palo Verde does stink here as well. It’s probably the worst smelling wood.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1440 posts in 1585 days


#8 posted 04-30-2019 07:24 PM



Even woodcarvers & whittlers avoid cottonwood, but they do some amazing thins with cottonwood BARK. Native American (Hopi) carvers like to work in cottonwood ROOTS – such as this “Corn Maiden” kachina.

- Phil32

It makes great lumber also. Very beautiful grain and character and easy to work. It’s a cousin to poplar. It’s lighter in weight than poplar but to me is about the same in hardness.

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Nubsnstubs

1534 posts in 2091 days


#9 posted 05-01-2019 12:35 AM

I haven t smelled anything other than a nice smell form Cottonwood. I equate the smell almost like the smell you get from Olive. Distinct, but not malodorous…... Now, wet Palo Verde will have you looking all around your shop for dog piles if you have a dog. ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs

You never smelled anything bad from the Cottonwood you got from me? I have the smell of it. Here, everything I have come across all smells bad. When I m done with the sawmill at the end of the day and I have handled a lot, I can smell it on my hands all night, even after a shower…

The Palo Verde does stink here as well. It s probably the worst smelling wood.

- AZWoody

Charles, welcome back. I thought you’d been sent to prison or something. Haven’t heard anything from you since January. I hope your trip was enjoyable…...

They Cottonwood I was referencing is the wood I got from you. Pleasant smell for me. The cottonwood I get from near Prescott doesn’t have any smell, but it’s also from wood that has been dead for years. I guess it’s possible that when the wood starts drying, it loses it’s odor…....... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Thalweg's profile

Thalweg

103 posts in 3767 days


#10 posted 05-01-2019 03:15 AM

This whole discussion got me wondering about turning cottonwood. So I grabbed a chunk out in the field today and loaded it up on the lathe tonight just to see how it would turn. I’m very much a rookie turner, so my opinion may not be worth much, but I thought it turned nicely. I can’t smell anything, and neither can my wife who has a super sniffer. I don’t see any fuzz, and I think it’s got an attractive grain. It is very dry and has been on the ground for quite a few years. For this photo I rubbed on a little Armr-Seal to bring out the grain.

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Kelly

2280 posts in 3305 days


#11 posted 05-01-2019 05:30 AM

Wet does equal fuzzy.

Dry can be very pretty.

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