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any One-Eyed turners out there ?

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Forum topic by John Smith posted 04-22-2019 02:17 PM 840 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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John Smith

1794 posts in 520 days


04-22-2019 02:17 PM

and yes, this is a serious question.

my last head injury with the table saw kick-back is really affecting my vision.
the vision in my left eye is steadily deteriorating and is not correctable.
I have tried turning a few small projects but I am becoming more uncomfortable
with the depth perception thing.
so I am wondering if there are other members with similar setbacks that have overcome
this issue and how do you deal with depth perception with just one eye. (a good eye).
yeah, yeah, yeah. I know, I know ~ stay away from fast turning machines that can hurt you.
[just looking for good honest feedback]

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --


29 replies so far

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

80 posts in 84 days


#1 posted 04-22-2019 02:20 PM

What kind of lathe do you have?
What types of turnings are you going to do?
What type of dust collection do you have? Answering a few questions will get you better answers and if you have any pictures that would be a big help too.

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

258 posts in 888 days


#2 posted 04-22-2019 02:42 PM

I would talk with an eye doctor as a first step. I have deal with temporary issues by covering the bad eye while it healed, but your situation is different and that may be the wrong way to deal with it. I would guess the biggest thing will be re-practicing and working more by feel than you used to.

Now can you turn with impaired vision? Of course you can once you adapt. Take a look at this guys work with no vision.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkkxNOUNP8kNT7Gvpc1MjJg

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John Smith

1794 posts in 520 days


#3 posted 04-22-2019 02:47 PM

LeeRoy – are you dealing with visual impairment ???
the question is dealing with depth perception only.
not what kind of equipment or tools that I may or may not have.
and since you asked, here is a sample of my recent turnings.
[with one and a half good eyes].

Rob – my right eye is my dominate eye. so that is a plus. I see the
optometrist on a regular basis and he says that “most” people that lose
an eye recover their former perception with time.
I am just asking about any members with the same issue that enjoys the
same hobbies that we do.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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GR8HUNTER

5953 posts in 1070 days


#4 posted 04-22-2019 03:24 PM

i wish you all the best luck possible i remember when your accident happened im thinking since your vision is getting worse it will take a lot more time getting used to it since its not at the end does your eye doctor say total loss of eye after awhile ?
hang in the buddy them mallets are better then mine with 2 eyes :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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mahdee

4277 posts in 2125 days


#5 posted 04-22-2019 03:33 PM

I wonder if you wear a patch when turning it will help you see better.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Rich

4386 posts in 947 days


#6 posted 04-22-2019 03:36 PM


LeeRoy – are you dealing with visual impairment ???
the question is dealing with depth perception only.
not what kind of equipment or tools that I may or may not have.

- John Smith

I think LeeRoy was channeling you, John, and doing a pretty good job of it. Particularly the part about posting photos. That was classic.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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John Smith

1794 posts in 520 days


#7 posted 04-22-2019 03:38 PM

Thanks Tony.
yes, the left eye is in a downward trend and the prognosis is not good.
I wear a patch most of the time indoors and all the time when outside.
as with losing anything that God gave us, we must Adapt, Improvise and Overcome !!!
LOL I thought about making a really nice wooden patch with a leather strap but
when you think about it. . . . . there are not too many finishes or wood species that
you would like to have over your eye for hours at a time. which could cause you more
problems than you already have. and the same with a chemically processed leather patch
like ole Rooster Cogburn. (so I’am sticking with the sterile version).

[and yes, I like to see photos of peoples concerns, issues and projects]

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2238 posts in 2347 days


#8 posted 04-22-2019 03:45 PM

John what is difficult for you? I’ve yet to need to deal with your situation, but just thinking about it, is it tool to the wood or the depth/position that the tool is into the wood (meaning a cove or other feature with depth) or possibly both?

Do you tend to watch the tool or look “above” at the profile the tool is leaving. For OD features that gives you a “single line” with no depth away from you to then focus on. Not sure about ID type features. If tool placement, for bevel tools, perhaps exaggerating the “B” of ABC, ie exaggerate the handle drop to be sure the bevel rubs 1st. Makes things slower but could help. Not sure what to do for scrapers. More info on what specifically gives you the most problem could. I know you would prefer help from someone who has lived with the issue – just trying to help.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

80 posts in 84 days


#9 posted 04-22-2019 04:35 PM


LeeRoy – are you dealing with visual impairment ???
Yes, I have the ICSS syndrome.

not what kind of equipment or tools that I may or may not have.
I thought it might make a difference if you were using a mini lathe for pens or turning big bowls like the guy with the tractor…

John Smith

Other than my comments above I was pretty much just funnin with ya. I see you ask those questions whenever anybody else asks somethig. I like the wood eyepatch idea, better than looking like a pirate.

Also google can be your friend, try “Turning with Physical Limitations”

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1262 posts in 1266 days


#10 posted 04-22-2019 04:53 PM

Sorry to hear about the deterioration of your eyesight. I remember your early postings about your kickback accident and can imagine it must be frustrating having to deal with the aftermath.

While I don’t have such sight issues, I’m wondering if the lighting directly over your work area might not be adjusted to help with the depth perception problem you’re experiencing. By that I mean, if there was a light source that could cast a shadow at the correct angle, would that perhaps enable you to have a better sense of the distance between the tool and the workpiece? If you had a gooseneck type lamp that could be positioned strategically and moved when necessary, as the workpiece took shape, the shadow might help you to determine the differential in the short distances between the tip of the tool and the point of contact with the piece.

Not sure if that makes any sense or if it could be a solution but I’m one of those who thinks you can teach an old dog new tricks. Where there’s a will…

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View sgcz75b's profile

sgcz75b

43 posts in 118 days


#11 posted 04-22-2019 05:13 PM

A friend lost his left eye to shrapnel in Vietnam. He found that he could improve his depth perception by having a very dark and consistent background and using bright light coming from 40-50 degrees to his body with a reduced light above and behind him.

He made flies for trout fishing and they were works of art and caught fish.

Best wishes to you and keep adapting.

-- Remember - You're not a "real" woodworker unless you do exactly as another woodworker says you must do. It's called "The True Woodworker Fallacy."

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1794 posts in 520 days


#12 posted 04-22-2019 05:42 PM

brainstorming issues are always very helpful.
mainly, I am having trouble gauging distance between two points
from an angle.
I like the idea of a black or dark background. I will paint a piece
of something and put it behind the workpiece. I’ve had a gooseneck
LED light for the turnings for a few years now and that helps quite a bit.
impairments or not.
my next project is a Chris Pye influenced carver’s mallet for a friend.
thanks all !! have fun ~ be safe

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5428 posts in 3601 days


#13 posted 04-22-2019 06:17 PM

I had a friend who lost an eye. He could drive a car and never thought it to be a problem. There appears to be an artificial perception that guides our movements. When someone loses an eye, or even total blindness, you are able to “see”, not by your eyes, but by a spatial relationship. I find that in the dark, I can reach for something next to my bed without actually seeing it. Totally blind people can move about in their home without tripping over anything as long as they are not moved or rearranged. I guess it’s a sixth sense you develop to overcome any loss of another sense. It’s the combination of the five senses that work together to guide us through the day. When one sense is lost, the other four senses come together to maintain our equilibrium. It may sound like I know what I’m talking about, but that is my explanation for what it’s worth. BTW, I have heard of a woodworker who is totally blind, something I can’t comprehend. I guess if you have the will, nothing is impossible. Amvets are a good example of what can be done despite a disability.

View ruger's profile

ruger

102 posts in 453 days


#14 posted 04-22-2019 09:07 PM

John, I can’t give you any advice, but I want you to know I enjoy your talents and follow your projects. your story on your kick back accident has been burned into my memory. I think about it all the time when i’m making a cut in my unisaw. thanks for sharing it .it caused me to spend hours researching the subject of kickbacks and how to avoid them as best I can.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

630 posts in 1106 days


#15 posted 04-22-2019 11:19 PM

I used to play tennis with a guy that had no sight in one eye. He seemed to have fine depth perception, and maybe that was due to having the problem since he was a kid. He could toss a ball straight up and catch in a tennis ball can, and could do it better than I could.

And then, when I was about 33, I had a brain tumor that messed up my eye alignment. I had to wear an eye patch. Both eyes worked, but didn’t point in the same direction. In the year of the eye patch, I never got the great depth perception my tennis buddy did. I did get hit on often by women that like that sort of thing, which I thought was odd. Had I not been married, that might have compensated for the loss of depth perception. Happily, surgery got the tumor and it was not cancerous.

Finding acceptable eyepatches is not easy. They need to be concave enough that your eyelashes don’t brush the inside of the patch when you blink. It will get painful eventually. The ones I finally found were made in Germany, but I wouldn’t know how to get them now.

I am so scared of going back to one eye again that I wear safety glasses to change toilet paper rolls (Ok, that’s an exaggeration). But I do use eye protection for about everything.

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