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Picture frame fails after 20+ years - how to repair?

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Forum topic by BB1 posted 04-22-2019 01:44 AM 456 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BB1

1360 posts in 1206 days


04-22-2019 01:44 AM

A few days ago there was a noise from the far side of our house. Weather outside was really windy and I thought the noise was something blowing in the yard. However later when I walked in the room, there was a frame broken into four pieces scattered across the floor. I would like to try to repair the frame as it, and the print inside, was a gift about 20+ years ago. It appears there were splines of some sort. These are some pictures of the pieces. Any suggestions are appreciated. Still puzzled by what caused the failure after all this time.


8 replies so far

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

248 posts in 817 days


#1 posted 04-22-2019 02:15 AM

Saw out the splines and replace them. Should be pretty easy to do.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

426 posts in 537 days


#2 posted 04-22-2019 03:14 AM

Make a new better looking frame.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

22504 posts in 3463 days


#3 posted 04-22-2019 11:46 AM

I’d cut out a wider spline slot- like the width of a table saw blade and put in new splines and make sure the splines are long grain across the joint. That original spline one looks to be 1/16 “or smaller

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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BB1

1360 posts in 1206 days


#4 posted 04-22-2019 12:47 PM

Thanks – I’ve not done splines like this before (and is a pretty big frame). I assume I’ll need to trim the fragments/splinters and then glue up the corners and then cut out the old and insert new splines? Won’t have shop time until next weekend so plenty of opportunity to develop a plan!


Saw out the splines and replace them. Should be pretty easy to do.

- MikeDilday


I d cut out a wider spline slot- like the width of a table saw blade and put in new splines and make sure the splines are long grain across the joint. That original spline one looks to be 1/16 “or smaller

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh


View theart's profile

theart

91 posts in 912 days


#5 posted 04-22-2019 02:44 PM


Thanks – I ve not done splines like this before (and is a pretty big frame). I assume I ll need to trim the fragments/splinters and then glue up the corners and then cut out the old and insert new splines? Won t have shop time until next weekend so plenty of opportunity to develop a plan!

I usually put the splines in during glue-up, because I find it easier to keep the faces of the frame pieces flush that way. In this case, I would trim/sand the splinters off flush with the miters, then use the table saw + tenon jig to cut slots for the new splines. Cut the new splines to fit, and glue up everything at once.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

5954 posts in 1070 days


#6 posted 04-22-2019 03:40 PM



I d cut out a wider spline slot- like the width of a table saw blade and put in new splines and make sure the splines are long grain across the joint. That original spline one looks to be 1/16 “or smaller

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh


+1 DITTO ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ :<))))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4277 posts in 2125 days


#7 posted 04-22-2019 03:44 PM

Maybe find a thin oak plywood and cut it to serve as backing. You can use the iron on edge banding for the sides.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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mahdee

4277 posts in 2125 days


#8 posted 04-22-2019 03:48 PM

Another option I can think of is to use the plywood backing but cut it about 1/2” shorter on all sides and use real wood to flush it with the sides. That way you can router the corners. It may require sanding the frame (at least the sides) to match colors.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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