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Forum topic by wheelers45 posted 04-21-2019 05:05 PM 466 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wheelers45

9 posts in 1587 days


04-21-2019 05:05 PM

On a 2’x4’ walnut slab I routed out the outline of a lake. Then routed out the inside leaving about 1/4” deep hole in the slab looking like a lake with little coves and arms. Filled the whole thing with blue tinted epoxy. Looked great with the shiny blue water on the walnut slab. Now comes my problem. I started sanding the slab with 150 grit paper. Of course this scratched and dulled the shiny blue water. I stopped and started asking for help. Was told to start sanding the resin with 80grit and work up to 1500grit. Did this and it did help. Used Muguires polishing compound and it also helped but had dull areas. Now I had to Sand the slab to get rid of the epoxy that got on the slab. Of course that dulled the epoxy some. I went ahead and finished sanding the slab to 1200g. Now putting on 3rd coat of tung oil. Not sure how the project will turn out. Looking for some help on how to keep the lake that shiny blue and get a nice finish on the walnut. Any help would really be appreciated

B. Martin


11 replies so far

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ArtMann

1365 posts in 1178 days


#1 posted 04-22-2019 01:06 AM

I think you need a finish that builds some thickness and Tung oil will never do that.

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Karen

11 posts in 285 days


#2 posted 04-22-2019 02:01 AM

I’ve never encountered this problem myself, but I did read on the www.artresin.com website that putting another coat of epoxy on top will hide scuff marks/imperfections and make it shiny again. You may have to sand out a little of the existing epoxy to create a ‘well’ for the new layer, and also to make the new layer level with the wood. Check out their website for more info under the FAQ section—look for the question about doing a second or multiple coats. Hope this help! Good luck!

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SMP

866 posts in 268 days


#3 posted 04-22-2019 05:53 AM

You can get good results from car products designed for buffing out clear coat, but it costs a lot to get all the products initially and works best with a DA polisher etc. Your next best bet is acrylic polish, i use the red bottle in this kit mostly(pet stores may carry for polishing plexiglass fish tanks)
https://www.amazon.com/Novus-7100-Plastic-Polish-Kit/dp/B002UCYRZU

You can also get good results with a heat gun after wet sanding to > 1000, but it takes some patience and practice. Use a scrap, sand, hold heat gun further back and start a swirling motion while slowly bringing it closer to the surface. Keep bringing it closer til you see the surface “flash” and then back away.

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Tmanpdx

19 posts in 74 days


#4 posted 04-22-2019 08:01 AM

You need to put a finish on the epoxy. The scratches will magically disappear b/c the finish fills in the scratches. Use a clear topcoat of your choice.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1797 posts in 525 days


#5 posted 04-22-2019 11:58 AM

I would be very leary about using automotive products on any kind
of wood project. especially the finish.
if any amount of silicone or other weather repelling wax or chemical
is in the product ~ the wood finish you apply “could” fish-eye out of control
and create more problems than you have ever imagined.
(with the exception of Bondo – Bondo is your friend).
people need to go back to the Old School and learn how to use Pumice and Rottenstone.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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Lazyman

3339 posts in 1750 days


#6 posted 04-22-2019 01:17 PM

I just polished an epoxy inlay on a turned sphere and I had to go all the way to 2000 grit (i didn’t have any grits between 1200 & 2000) to get a good sheen on the epoxy. 1200 left it just a little hazy still but after the 2000, it actually looked like it had a finish on it. It will help if you wet sand, though I did not have to resort to that, probably because the inlay was fairly narrow. It may be better to wet sand with a no resin BLO or tung oil than water to avoid having water seep into the wood. I don’t think that normal auto type polishing compounds are the best choice, though the ones design specifically for plastic should work. Look for a good plastic polish such as Hut Ultra Gloss. A power buffer will help with such a large area.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Rich

4416 posts in 952 days


#7 posted 04-22-2019 09:11 PM

Keep going to higher grits. The idea is to get it flat and smooth with the coarser paper, then start wet sanding. Based on my experience, 2000 is no where near fine enough.

Regarding automotive products on wood, it’s done all the time. My favorite wax for finishing my table tops is Mother’s Pure Brazilian Carnauba Wax. I put pieces out at shows and people can’t stop touching them.

If you’re concerned about silicone, check the SDS.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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wheelers45

9 posts in 1587 days


#8 posted 04-22-2019 11:04 PM

Wow, thanks so much for all the great replies. Since there is so little space between epoxy and wood, what I do to the epoxy will also be don to the wood. If I sand the epoxy the same will happen to the wood. If I use some compound on the epoxy it will also get on the wood. Any ideas how I can work on one surface without affecting the other?
Hope I’m explaining this so it’s clear what I’m trying to do. Again THANKS for the feedback.

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SMP

866 posts in 268 days


#9 posted 04-22-2019 11:30 PM



Wow, thanks so much for all the great replies. Since there is so little space between epoxy and wood, what I do to the epoxy will also be don to the wood. If I sand the epoxy the same will happen to the wood. If I use some compound on the epoxy it will also get on the wood. Any ideas how I can work on one surface without affecting the other?
Hope I’m explaining this so it’s clear what I’m trying to do. Again THANKS for the feedback.

- wheelers45

I guess i’m not entirely sure why you are trying to use 2 different finishes? Is it just for sheen purposes? I’d just epoxy the whole thing, and if you are worried about the lake being glossier, after it cures, mask off the lake with “easy release” painter tape, and then on the wood parts either 0000 strel wool, or wet sand to 1200 etc.

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OSU55

2251 posts in 2352 days


#10 posted 04-23-2019 12:20 PM

Do your wet sanding with mineral spirits. Wont raise the wood grain like water. I use Meguiar’s car finishing polishes on wood projects all the time. As stated above, coat the whole thing with CLEAR epoxy. You already have the blue color for the water. It will be tough if you want different sheens for the water vs wood.

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

314 posts in 2097 days


#11 posted 04-24-2019 12:51 PM

I’ve never done it myself, but I have seen people on youtube just brush on a thin coat of clear epoxy. It should self-level to get rid of brush strokes, and it fills in all of the scratches.

Again, I have no experience with this, only what I have seen on the internet. So you may want to test it out first.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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