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Airbrushes for finishing CNC work

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Forum topic by Grant Davis posted 04-18-2019 03:41 PM 346 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Grant Davis

797 posts in 4269 days


04-18-2019 03:41 PM

I’m looking to up my finishing game for some of my CNC carvings and am contemplating an airbrush, My final decision is down to two different models. I would like some input from some of you guys or gals that use airbrushes for finishing your work.

I am looking to use acrylic paint and also Trans Tint dyes on my projects.

My final choices are down to the following

Thayer & Chandler T61-1 Vega 2000 Airbrush

Iwata-Medea NEO TRN 1 Trigger Airbrush

Thanks in advance with any input on this.

-- Grant...."GO BUCKEYES"


7 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1797 posts in 523 days


#1 posted 04-18-2019 04:24 PM

I have had the Iwata and Paasche VL and liked them both.
I have a box of old Badger double actions that are entry level
and work quite well.
if you are going to be doing a volume of color, I would find one that
accepts the 2, 3, and 4oz jars with the siphon tube in the lid.
the airbrush model that has the metal cup on top of the gun is notorious for
spilling the contents all over the place. (it is more for the advanced artist).
a good flow of clean air with a precise pressure control and moisture trap is crucial.

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7359 posts in 2559 days


#2 posted 04-18-2019 06:25 PM

Depends on your projects… for smaller stuff with lots of different colors, the gravity fed system will let you change colors quicker than on a suction feed system. It should come with a reservoir cap, so spilling should not be a problem. Larger stuff benefits from suction feed as you can use different sized containers as John mentioned.

I’ve never seen that Vega-2000, but it looks pretty much identical to the harbor freight 'Deluxe' one, which itself is pretty much identical to the Badger 150 and Badger Anthem 155. I have an HF one, and it’s not too bad for the money. I also have a couple of Paasche brushes and can recommend them as well. The VL is a reliable workhorse and is great for putting down lots of paint, but somewhat limited on really detailed stuff… for that I switch to my AB Turbo which is the wildest airbrush I’ve ever used and can shoot individual atomized droplets if needed (unfortunately, it is no longer sold).

Also – quick tip for paint. You can get 2oz bottles of the hobby acrylic paint at places like Michaels for about 50 cents a bottle – it needs to be thinned, but that is super easy and cheap… just google it. They can also be mixed and matched for an endless array of colors, blend well and dry quick.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Dhuff's profile

Dhuff

15 posts in 626 days


#3 posted 04-19-2019 12:30 AM

I have a couple of Badger 175 Crescendo airbrushes and a model 100 from my scale modeling days. I think you will find them pretty good for the price. The 175’s use bottles with a siphon tube and the 100 is a detail airbrush that is gravity feed. Biggest issue I had with airbrushes was the air supply. Large compressors are made for a lot more volume than you will need and turning the air pressure low enough can be an issue. I found an airbrush compressor at Northern Tool that had a small (1 gallon) air tank that took any surge out of the compressor turning on an off. Unfortunately I think they discontinued it. My 2 cents.

Doug

View mel52's profile

mel52

809 posts in 625 days


#4 posted 04-19-2019 12:45 AM

Aztek is one of the easiest to clean and you just change the tips for different patterns etc. I have 2 Passche VLs that I used all the time until I got the Aztek. I had a taxidermy business for quite a few years and did a lot of competition work, pretty much forgot I had the Passches after the Aztek. You just change tips for various flows and effects.

-- MEL, Kansas

View Rich's profile

Rich

4401 posts in 950 days


#5 posted 04-19-2019 02:17 AM

Suction feed lets you change colors far faster than gravity feed. Just get one of the sets of 10 bottles on Amazon and you can fill them with different colors and put water in one. Switching colors involves only pulling off one color, running some water through the brush, removing the water, spray to clear the brush and attach the next color. Takes just seconds.

For what it’s worth, I have the Paasche VL as well. It works just fine for me.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7359 posts in 2559 days


#6 posted 04-19-2019 02:58 AM

Suction feed lets you change colors far faster than gravity feed. Just get one of the sets of 10 bottles on Amazon and you can fill them with different colors and put water in one. Switching colors involves only pulling off one color, running some water through the brush, removing the water, spray to clear the brush and attach the next color. Takes just seconds.
- Rich

Been there, done that :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1226 posts in 1855 days


#7 posted 04-19-2019 11:16 PM

+1 Iwate or Paasche for air brushes, period.

Went through a ghost flame and skulls paint job phase many years ago.
My Iwata eclipse is hands down my favorite. Several bottles with color & flush, stable low pressure regulator; and it just works. Have Passche gravity feed gun, which is another winner; but get tired of filling cup on big jobs with large tip, so use it only for fine details.
My entry level badger was never used again once I had the better air brushes; IMHO was a mistake to buy lessor quality air brush if you plan on any serious detail work or more than one simple project.

IMHO – If you will be covering large areas and prefer the pull trigger of the NEO, get TRN2 with large bottles. The smaller cups on TRN1 are useless on areas larger then couple inches square. Also note adding the gun handle and lower trigger hand position can be cumbersome doing detailed work. Had an Iwata Revolution, and still have a couple small detail guns; while they can act just like an air brush with small tips, the extra room required for trigger hand below the gun limits movement and control for detailed work.

I use my air brushes and detail gun(s) for mostly wood working these days. WB materials are very forgiving about clean up, can flush and let sit for days between uses. Using any solvent based material in gun:
- must have water filter or you get unwanted blushing/splatter.
- must clean and re-oil the intricate moving parts every night if you want to tool to last.
Lacquer/shellac plus solvents as well as the pigment in Behlen’s dye stains I used have proven to gum the needle valves and seats on these small instruments. YMMV

When covering projects with dye stains these days, I use a combination of HF detail gun for large areas, and Iwata Eclipse air brush for details. Often use my Iwata with dark brown stain to hide occasional exposed edge of sap wood on cherry, or to fix a sand through spot after top coats have been added.
Note that when using a sprayer for dye work on wood; you will still have to rub the surface down to get that hand rubbed look. Otherwise, you have color on top of and hiding the grain variation. All the air brush does in give you very control placement of color as you blend it into the wood.

PS: Expect it to take a week or more of using an air brush every day to get satisfactory artistic results. There is a learning curve for the various application techniques. It is not, pull the trigger and squirt on some color. The first couple of uses can be very frustrating, especially if you watch someone else using it. They make it look much easier than it really is! WWW is full of sites with airbrush technique training, and even formal schools for budding artists.

Best Luck on your airbrush journey!


I have had the Iwata and Paasche VL and liked them both.
I have a box of old Badger double actions that are entry level
and work quite well.
if you are going to be doing a volume of color, I would find one that
accepts the 2, 3, and 4oz jars with the siphon tube in the lid.
the airbrush model that has the metal cup on top of the gun is notorious for
spilling the contents all over the place. (it is more for the advanced artist).
a good flow of clean air with a precise pressure control and moisture trap is crucial.

- John Smith


-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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