LumberJocks

Metabo Orbital sander Lived for 30 years

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by anthm27 posted 04-18-2019 12:27 AM 733 views 0 times favorited 37 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View anthm27's profile

anthm27

818 posts in 1472 days


04-18-2019 12:27 AM

I,m not sure exactly but pretty sure I was either 19 or 20 years of age when I bought this sander, which puts it at 30 or 31 years old. Still remember the power tool shop I bought it from in Kensington, Sydney, Australia.

I stupidly left it out in the rain the other day, I dried it out for a couple of days and when I switched it on it let out a great spark so I quickly pulled the plug and guessing now that I should never turn it on again.

I am not quite sure of the model or wattage , It is hard to read. I can make out that it does 20000 osculations per minute.

I am trying to work out a replacement, already I am seeing the Makita similars only do 10000 oscillations per minute my old faithful did 20000.

Anybody have any ideas of the model and wattage of this machine and anybody with any recommendations of a similar replacement? Or can the water damage be fixed?

Thanks in advance
Anthony


37 replies so far

View SMP's profile

SMP

860 posts in 267 days


#1 posted 04-18-2019 12:41 AM

Do you see any plastic screw plugs? I’m guessing you arced the brushes when you turned it on wet. I’d probably take it apart best i could and see if i can get to the brushes, then blow dry the while thing inside really well. Look where the brushes touch the commutator and see if its in ok condition. I have cleaned up “burnt” commutators with 600 wet dry paper and a razor/jewelers screwdriver to clean the slots.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

818 posts in 1472 days


#2 posted 04-18-2019 12:44 AM



Do you see any plastic screw plugs? I’m guessing you arced the brushes when you turned it on wet. I’d probably take it apart best i could and see if i can get to the brushes, then blow dry the while thing inside really well. Look where the brushes touch the commutator and see if its in ok condition. I have cleaned up “burnt” commutators with 600 wet dry paper and a razor/jewelers screwdriver to clean the slots.

- SMP

Great advice thank you, There is no such plastic screw plugs for brushes so I suspect they are inside. I will definitely take it apart shortly although having said that I may need to get a special screw driver to do so. Ill take it upstairs and start. See what I find.
Thanks again

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

5966 posts in 1074 days


#3 posted 04-18-2019 12:58 AM

HERE TONY :<)))))))))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View SMP's profile

SMP

860 posts in 267 days


#4 posted 04-18-2019 01:03 AM


Great advice thank you, There is no such plastic screw plugs for brushes so I suspect they are inside. I will definitely take it apart shortly although having said that I may need to get a special screw driver to do so. Ill take it upstairs and start. See what I find.
Thanks again

- anthm27

If you have a harbor freight nearby they have sets of bits like security bits etc for $3 or $4 that probably fit and you put in a drill etc. Those same bit sets at home depot or lowes are $20-30

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

818 posts in 1472 days


#5 posted 04-18-2019 01:12 AM


If you have a harbor freight nearby they have sets of bits like security bits etc for $3 or $4 that probably fit and you put in a drill etc. Those same bit sets at home depot or lowes are $20-30

- SMP

Actually I,ll be in Chicago over the weekend so can get to Harbor Freight,

I,ve pulled this thing apart and exposed the brushes, I,m learning as I go here, this is what I,ve found, actually no real bad burn marks, do you mean I should clean the part that my finger is on? (is that the commutators??)

Thanks in advance

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

818 posts in 1472 days


#6 posted 04-18-2019 01:14 AM



HERE TONY :<)))))))))

- GR8HUNTER

Wow Tony, Nice internet searching,
Umm, yer, It looks like its in reasonable condition, and I tell you they are proven good machines.
Do I buy it?
I,m looking for excuses not to.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

818 posts in 1472 days


#7 posted 04-18-2019 01:17 AM


HERE TONY :<)))))))))

- GR8HUNTER

Just worked out its in the US , which would make it 110V as opposed to 240V which is what I need.
But definitely a good lead and worked out the Model number

View SMP's profile

SMP

860 posts in 267 days


#8 posted 04-18-2019 01:45 AM


If you have a harbor freight nearby they have sets of bits like security bits etc for $3 or $4 that probably fit and you put in a drill etc. Those same bit sets at home depot or lowes are $20-30

- SMP

Actually I,ll be in Chicago over the weekend so can get to Harbor Freight,

I,ve pulled this thing apart and exposed the brushes, I,m learning as I go here, this is what I,ve found, actually no real bad burn marks, do you mean I should clean the part that my finger is on? (is that the commutators??)

Thanks in advance

- anthm27

Correct take some 600 or 1000 grit wet/dry sandpaper, cut to a strip the width of that commutator, wrap it halfway around and then spin the whole stator by hand, applying just enough pressure to the paper to sand but allow it to spon, then keep doing that til you get it down to copper like the surrounding areas, you want to get all the glaze/carbon off the best you can. Then with a razor blade or screwdriver clean the lines that seperate each section, making sure no 2 parts touch(that was probably the spark you saw-water contacting 2 of those adjacent basically short circuit) then lightly sand the ends of the brushes. Blow everything off to get any dust or moisture out.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

818 posts in 1472 days


#9 posted 04-18-2019 01:56 AM


If you have a harbor freight nearby they have sets of bits like security bits etc for $3 or $4 that probably fit and you put in a drill etc. Those same bit sets at home depot or lowes are $20-30

- SMP

Actually I,ll be in Chicago over the weekend so can get to Harbor Freight,

I,ve pulled this thing apart and exposed the brushes, I,m learning as I go here, this is what I,ve found, actually no real bad burn marks, do you mean I should clean the part that my finger is on? (is that the commutators??)

Thanks in advance

- anthm27

Correct take some 600 or 1000 grit wet/dry sandpaper, cut to a strip the width of that commutator, wrap it halfway around and then spin the whole stator by hand, applying just enough pressure to the paper to sand but allow it to spon, then keep doing that til you get it down to copper like the surrounding areas, you want to get all the glaze/carbon off the best you can. Then with a razor blade or screwdriver clean the lines that seperate each section, making sure no 2 parts touch(that was probably the spark you saw-water contacting 2 of those adjacent basically short circuit) then lightly sand the ends of the brushes. Blow everything off to get any dust or moisture out.

- SMP

Ok,thanks for the info, So just to confirm where my finger is touching which is black, I need to get that back to copper? I,ve since contacted Metabo here in Hong Kong and they are trying to source new brushes for me.

I,ve just gotten what you mean about the security bits, thnaks but obviously I got it open.

Kind Regards
and thanks again
Anthony

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

25216 posts in 4213 days


#10 posted 04-18-2019 02:10 AM

Mate, that is an oldie. I have a similar version, a Ryobi;


This one is a much better tool


.
In conjunction with this mini palm belt sander;

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View SMP's profile

SMP

860 posts in 267 days


#11 posted 04-18-2019 02:48 AM

Ok,thanks for the info, So just to confirm where my finger is touching which is black, I need to get that back to copper? I,ve since contacted Metabo here in Hong Kong and they are trying to source new brushes for me.

I,ve just gotten what you mean about the security bits, thnaks but obviously I got it open.

Kind Regards
and thanks again
Anthony

- anthm27

Correct as clean as you can without taking too much actual copper off. It won’t be as clean as the sides. The goal is to get as much copper to brush contact as possible. Well i won’t get into the details of brush surface are vs edge area that gets into torque vs speed etc due to skin effect. The important thing here is metal to brush contact.
If you get new brushes they should come with new springs which will help also. New brushes and springs, lube any bearings/bushings and it will be good as new.

Is Metabo merged with Hitachi now?

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

818 posts in 1472 days


#12 posted 04-18-2019 03:20 AM


Correct as clean as you can without taking too much actual copper off. It won’t be as clean as the sides. The goal is to get as much copper to brush contact as possible. Well i won’t get into the details of brush surface are vs edge area that gets into torque vs speed etc due to skin effect. The important thing here is metal to brush contact.
If you get new brushes they should come with new springs which will help also. New brushes and springs, lube any bearings/bushings and it will be good as new.

Is Metabo merged with Hitachi now?

- SMP

Thats great, I shall keep you updated, Just waiting for the Metabo rep to email me back about the parts, I shall ask him about the Hitachi and Metabo merging thing,

Thanks again
and I shall update.

Regards
Anth

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

818 posts in 1472 days


#13 posted 04-18-2019 03:22 AM



Mate, that is an oldie. I have a similar version, a Ryobi;

In conjunction with this mini palm belt sander;
- Grumpy

They Look like good old faithfuls that are serving well, Good idea with the cords in the PVC, I guess the PVC pipe just stays on the cord when in use.
Nice one

Regards
Anth

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

25216 posts in 4213 days


#14 posted 04-18-2019 03:38 AM

No the pvc is removed when in use. A very cheap way to tidy up the cord.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7359 posts in 2561 days


#15 posted 04-18-2019 03:39 AM

Those brushes don’t look too bad. There should be a mark or indicator on them which is the point at which they need to be replaced. As for the commutator (where your finger is), yes – clean them up with some fine sandpaper and if needed, undercut the mica between each one slightly.

While you have it apart, now is also a good time to replace the bearings :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

showing 1 through 15 of 37 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com