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Forum topic by Patrickgeddes14 posted 04-15-2019 03:45 PM 265 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Patrickgeddes14

112 posts in 148 days


04-15-2019 03:45 PM

5 replies so far

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builtinbkyn

2927 posts in 1273 days


#1 posted 04-15-2019 03:50 PM

Not sure exactly what you question(s) is, but the tear out is due to the fact you were routing end grain. It will take some sanding to eliminate all you pointed out in the video. Belt sander will do it quickly. You just need to control your passes to keep things flat.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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John Smith

1760 posts in 495 days


#2 posted 04-15-2019 04:44 PM

like you said, it could be dull cutting tools or the wrong speed.
when you do the other side, if you see tear-out or other issues,
stop and investigate what is going wrong before you spend all
that time planing it down only having to spend more time getting
it smooth with a belt sander.
(just an observation)

what kind of bit are you using in your router ?
this is what I have and they cut extremely smooth when moved
at a moderate pace.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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Patrickgeddes14

112 posts in 148 days


#3 posted 04-15-2019 05:21 PM

Something like that, 1/4porter cable though. Why belt and not disc? I feel muchore comfortable with a disc. Thanks for the input and I take nothing personal so idc what you say

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Patrickgeddes14

112 posts in 148 days


#4 posted 04-15-2019 05:22 PM

I combined replying to your pm and your post on this thread into one answer. That kind of morning

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John Smith

1760 posts in 495 days


#5 posted 04-15-2019 09:04 PM

Patrick – do you have any history on this piece of wood?
like, where did it come from, and how long has it been cut?
I am thinking that the wood itself may be the issue as some of those
tear-out areas are consistent with what is called “punky” where
the wood fibers are breaking down with deterioration (similar to rotting).
and the dark lines are spalting, like you had suspected.
as for the punky wood, it is soft like a sponge. wood turners that
find punky wood have to soak it in epoxy in order to make it hard enough
to turn on the lathe and make it smooth. you can detect punky wood by
picking at it with a screwdriver. and if you can dig out wood pulp with very
little effort, that is what you have.
if that is the bottom of the slab, you can experiment with epoxy on a couple
of the spots and you will see what may be required on the other side
to make it workable. so I am thinking it is the condition of the wood itself
and not your router bit. (although a bit that is as sharp as possible will help a lot).


if you are comfortable with the RO disk sander, that is fine.
I am comfortable with both but I find that a belt sander with
a coarse grit (like 40 or 60) can remove a lot of material very quickly.
moving up the ladder to 100, 120 and 220 grit for the belt then switch
to the RO disk sander for finishing it up. (it is strictly a personal preference).
since that is the underside of the slab, you really don’t have to do much to it
as it will never be seen by most folks.
but for the show side – you need to find out what is making the divots and
tear-outs to make the project more enjoyable.
on the other slab, you have done a fantastic job so far and once you get the
finish figured out, you will be golden !!

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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