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New Miter Saw Issue: PLEASE HELP

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Forum topic by hughes8049 posted 04-13-2019 11:33 PM 606 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hughes8049

3 posts in 218 days


04-13-2019 11:33 PM

Hello everyone. I have been searching all over for answer to my question, but I think I may not be using the correct terminology. I recently replaced my 18 year old Makita miter saw with a Dewalt DW717 10” sliding compound miter saw.

I ordered the saw and when I received it I ran ito the problem described below. I could not find an answer, so I sent the saw back for a replacement, which is doing the exact same thing. I cannot imagine that I would get two saw with the same exact defect on such a highly reviewed tool, so I am assuming there is an adjustment that can be made or I am just doing something wrong here.

I was attempting to ensure the saw was square using the 5 cut method. The problem is that if I bring the saw straight down into the lumber and then raise it and make a second cut on the side farthest from the fence, the cuts are about 1/32nd” different. I did this, because I noticed that if I make the cut across the stock properly the same thing happens. When the blade is pushed back into the “home” position I allow the blade to stop spinning and raise the saw only to find that the last half of the cut is slightly deeper. Obviously this is problematic and I never had this problem with the Makita. I have checked with 2 different squares and I believe everything is good. I would also just expect the saw to cut out of square if it wasn’t, and not to behave in this way. I will attach a pic, because it is very hard to explain.

Any advice you have would be much appreciated. I really don’t want to send another saw back.

**Also, I have tried multiple blades and I have tried clamping the work piece down to make sure I am not moving it in any way.


14 replies so far

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

499 posts in 319 days


#1 posted 04-13-2019 11:54 PM


The problem is that if I bring the saw straight down into the lumber and then raise it and make a second cut on the side farthest from the fence, the cuts are about 1/32nd” different. I did this, because I noticed that if I make the cut across the stock properly the same thing happens.

- hughes8049

Try this. Put a square edge against the fence. Extend the saw. Power up the saw above the work (so the torque twist happens outside of the work), plunge the blade, push it in, then raise the blade…then release power again so the torque twist is when the blade is out of the work. I never start or stop the saw in contact with the work as the motor torque will create a secondary kerf line.

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SMP

1426 posts in 445 days


#2 posted 04-14-2019 12:03 AM

Do you still have the makita? Maybe it has a stiffer blade? My dewalt saw has a torque twist as mentioned that causes blade deflection in the stock blade(on the thin side). I’ve gotten used to it, but something else to try if the above doesn’t help enough.

View Delete's profile

Delete

439 posts in 912 days


#3 posted 04-14-2019 12:28 AM

I agree with BlueRidge again, from what you describe and from the picture, you seem to be releasing the trigger while still in contact with the cut. As the blade is speeding up or slowing down you will get some movement at the cutting edge. As suggested try bringing the blade up to full speed before starting the cut and more important raise the blade completely out of the work before releasing the trigger.

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hughes8049

3 posts in 218 days


#4 posted 04-14-2019 12:43 AM

Thank you, everyone. I will try that in the morning. I have tried using the blade form my Makita, but the cut in the picture was made with the stock Dewalt blade. I was taught that you should not raise the blade until it stops in order to prevent kickback in thicker stock, but if altering that approach will get me a cleaner cut, then that’s what I’ll do.

The other thing to note is that I get the same results if I make the cut in two separate cuts. For example, if I start the saw, plunge into the work piece, raise it, and then repeat at the far end of the work piece I get the exact same results, and it is actually slightly more pronounced. I’m not saying you guys are incorrect, and I will definitely try your suggestions, it just seems odd that I would get the same results this way. The blade from my Makita is just a Diablo from Home Depot. Perhaps I’ll throw a Freud on it and see if that eliminates the issue. Thanks again. I’ll let you know how it goes in the morning.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

499 posts in 319 days


#5 posted 04-14-2019 12:56 AM



I was taught that you should not raise the blade until it stops in order to prevent kickback in thicker stock,
- hughes8049

To prevent kickback in a miter, that is trying to pull the work away from you, and push the blade and carriage toward you, I cut from front to back, plunging with the saw at full speed and exiting with the saw at full speed. When in doubt, I clamp.

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Delete

439 posts in 912 days


#6 posted 04-14-2019 01:04 AM

That would be the most likely reason. I can’t see a bad blade leaving one ridge like that, more likely a bad blade will give you very rough cuts. The other options are not so great, faulty contact surfaces, bad bearings, etc. but I can’t see that in two new saws. Can you clamp the work down, I know you said you held it down tight but I have found that even holding it tight sometimes, the work will vibrate into the blade especially if you wait for the blade to come to a stop before raising it out of the work.

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

259 posts in 999 days


#7 posted 04-14-2019 02:04 AM

Take a 1×12 or 2×12, make a cut and put a square on it.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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Redoak49

4239 posts in 2528 days


#8 posted 04-14-2019 10:38 AM

I have put a square to a piece cut on my miter saw and it seems perfect. I will admit that I am not using an engineer square.

What is the expected accuracy of a miter saw?

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MikeDilday

259 posts in 999 days


#9 posted 04-14-2019 12:06 PM

I have never done anything beyond a square. I expect they are pretty accurate. Maybe I will try the 5 cut method later today and see what I get on mine. You are probably fine if the cuts agree with a square.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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MikeDilday

259 posts in 999 days


#10 posted 04-14-2019 01:28 PM

I just did the 5 cut method on my DEWALT double bevel slider and was 4/64 which I calculated to 1/64 on a single cut over 12”. I build furniture, cabinets with face frames and trim and it is spot on for me.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

499 posts in 319 days


#11 posted 04-14-2019 02:06 PM

Mine cuts square when measured with a square. Often I make it cut out of square when fitting a part to a given opening:

I use card stock or folded sandpaper to make minor adustments.

View hughes8049's profile

hughes8049

3 posts in 218 days


#12 posted 04-14-2019 05:49 PM

Thanks for the help, everyone. I pt a Freud blade on it and the issue seems to have gone away entirely. I don’t know, maybe the other blades couldn’t handle the torque? Either way, it seems to be resolved, and I appreciate everyone chiming in. It is not cutting nice and square.

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SMP

1426 posts in 445 days


#13 posted 04-14-2019 10:01 PM


Thanks for the help, everyone. I pt a Freud blade on it and the issue seems to have gone away entirely. I don t know, maybe the other blades couldn t handle the torque? Either way, it seems to be resolved, and I appreciate everyone chiming in. It is not cutting nice and square.

- hughes8049

Good to hear. Thats why i mentioned swapping the blade. I know the blade on mine does this due to the torque twist, but I compensate and am more of a hybrid woodworker. I’ve had better blades in my amazon cart but always buy other tools, so many to get!

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 253 days


#14 posted 04-14-2019 10:56 PM

I have tried diablo blades on my skil and other portables and tried a 10 inch on a tablesaw. I will not use them again and i will recommend irwin blades in handheld saws they are the best inexpensive blades and forrest or freud blades in everything else. They are the only blades i get sharpened and reuse. I have some very old craftsman blades that are really high quality. I use them for a few things and change out to a freud for really smooth cuts. I got a forrest for my hitachi miter saw and it works great

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

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