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Put a gouge in my SawStop Table

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Forum topic by gmaffPappy posted 04-13-2019 05:40 PM 1128 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gmaffPappy

63 posts in 2394 days


04-13-2019 05:40 PM

Last night, I was routing some circles out of plywood with a circle jig. I set the depth stop, but it apparently wrong. Even though I had sacrificial material beneath the board I was routing, it wasn’t enough. The inadvertent result is a partial circular gouge in the cast iron table top. I never thought this possible. I always considered the table to be be the most indestructible part of my shop. Well, proof positive….hardened steal, carbide tipped, router bits can easily cut up a cast iron table saw :-(

Now the question is, what should I do? I was thinking of cleaning it VERY, VERY WELL, then filling it with an epoxy of some type. Then figuring a way to grind it down flush with the table.

Should I take it somewhere to get the gouge filled and top reground?

Or, just live with it.

Ideas…Please?

-- If it's easy to do, you haven't spent enough time over engineering it.


36 replies so far

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knotscott

8279 posts in 3739 days


#1 posted 04-13-2019 05:48 PM

Just call it a battle scar. Probably more harm done to your ego than the function of the saw. Give it time…it’ll grow back! ;-)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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mahdee

4288 posts in 2131 days


#2 posted 04-13-2019 05:48 PM

I would live with it depending on where it is. The surface might be too smooth for epoxy. Bondo might work best.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Fred Hargis

5507 posts in 2857 days


#3 posted 04-13-2019 05:48 PM

If it was me, I’d just live with it. The exception might be is it is in a place where it snags the wood I’m sawing. In that case I’m not sure what I’d do, but getting the gouge filled and top reground might be hard to do (around here, anyway). I’m actually surprised it did that much damage, I’d bet the router bit is toast.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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a1Jim

117618 posts in 3940 days


#4 posted 04-13-2019 06:07 PM

As others have said leave it there’s nothing you can do that will make it look better,plus leaving it there reminds you not to do router work on your table saw’s top.

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Redoak49

3927 posts in 2352 days


#5 posted 04-13-2019 06:20 PM

I would live with it. My Sawstop has a number of scratches and such and as long as they are smooth and do not scratch the wood I cut, it is fine.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4419 posts in 953 days


#6 posted 04-13-2019 06:21 PM

Check for burrs around the edge and fill it with epoxy. Have a razor blade or chisel ready so, depending on the cure time of the epoxy you use, you can slice it cleanly flush with the top of the saw. There will be a point where it’s cured enough not to be gummy, but not so much that it’s hard.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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clin

1027 posts in 1359 days


#7 posted 04-13-2019 06:31 PM

I say fill it. You don’t want the possibility of something catching on it. As for a filler, I would use JB Weld. It’s an epoxy with some sort of metal powder in it, I think. As previously suggested, I would let it get pretty hard, then scrap it flat before it completely hardens. Maybe practice on something first.

JB Weld is tough stuff. It comes by its name honestly. I’ve stuck metal together that normal people would have welded, expecting it to last until I could do a better repair. But, it never failed after years.

-- Clin

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Andre

2577 posts in 2169 days


#8 posted 04-13-2019 08:34 PM

Fill it, never used JB weld but have used a product from Lock tite that was a metal epoxy (industrial service) that you can drill and tap when cured. File and sand smooth when hard.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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SMP

869 posts in 269 days


#9 posted 04-13-2019 08:55 PM


Fill it, never used JB weld but have used a product from Lock tite that was a metal epoxy (industrial service) that you can drill and tap when cured. File and sand smooth when hard.

- Andre

I second that epoxy putty stick that is two colors you knead to mix. Have used it for various things and works well.

View gmaffPappy's profile

gmaffPappy

63 posts in 2394 days


#10 posted 04-13-2019 09:27 PM



If it was me, I d just live with it. The exception might be is it is in a place where it snags the wood I m sawing. In that case I m not sure what I d do, but getting the gouge filled and top reground might be hard to do (around here, anyway). I m actually surprised it did that much damage, I d bet the router bit is toast.

- Fred Hargis


The funny thing is, the bit is fine. It cut the rest of the needed circles w/o a problem.

Thanks for the suggestions. I’ll look into that epoxy.

-- If it's easy to do, you haven't spent enough time over engineering it.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1310 posts in 2316 days


#11 posted 04-13-2019 10:19 PM


If it was me, I d just live with it. The exception might be is it is in a place where it snags the wood I m sawing. In that case I m not sure what I d do, but getting the gouge filled and top reground might be hard to do (around here, anyway). I m actually surprised it did that much damage, I d bet the router bit is toast.

- Fred Hargis

The funny thing is, the bit is fine. It cut the rest of the needed circles w/o a problem.

Thanks for the suggestions. I ll look into that epoxy.

- gmaffPappy

Cast iron isn’t that tough. I have a related hole in the table on my drill press. I was certain that the bit was aligned over the hole in the table, but it missed by about 1/8”. For the drill press it is no biggie. I think I would fill the gouge in the saw table or at least make certain that the edges were smoothed so they couldn’t catch any work piece.

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Bob5103

127 posts in 1197 days


#12 posted 04-13-2019 10:44 PM

JB Weld Steelstick or Milliput epoxies should work just fine. The JB Weld sets up in 6 minutes, Milliput a little longer. Both can be sanded.

View duc996's profile

duc996

29 posts in 1861 days


#13 posted 04-13-2019 10:47 PM

If it’s part of the wing that got damaged why don’t you or get someone to weld and fill it in then grind and sand it flush. I would tape/ cover the entire top except the damaged gouge then fill in the weld. I know you can weld cast iron if you use a high nickel rod. Just another option.

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gmaffPappy

63 posts in 2394 days


#14 posted 04-13-2019 11:31 PM



If it’s part of the wing that got damaged why don’t you or get someone to weld and fill it in then grind and sand it flush. I would tape/ cover the entire top except the damaged gouge then fill in the weld. I know you can weld cast iron if you use a high nickel rod. Just another option.

- duc996

Yah, I thought about a weld fill. I was a welder….decades ago. But I thought it might do more damage to the flush top, as it would get heated really high in order for the weld to take. I’m pretty sure that would throw off the true/flat nature of the table?

-- If it's easy to do, you haven't spent enough time over engineering it.

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BlueRidgeDog

485 posts in 143 days


#15 posted 04-13-2019 11:48 PM

Epoxy, sand, but then wax and move on.

Welding it would be too much localized heat and you would risk warping the top and THAT would be fatal….tis but a scratch.

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