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Is this ok...planer question

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Forum topic by BB1 posted 04-08-2019 02:06 AM 396 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BB1

1353 posts in 1179 days


04-08-2019 02:06 AM

Is it OK to attach a thin (1/4 or 1/8 inch) piece of wood to a thicker section of plywood (eg, 3/4 in) with double-sided tape and put that hrough the planer? Saw a suggestion on using this for resaw pieces and want to make sure this is a safe/good technique before trying it. Thanks.


12 replies so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

22334 posts in 3436 days


#1 posted 04-08-2019 09:27 AM

Only one way to find out! It seems logical that it will work.
When I want to cut 1/8 “or 1/4” pieces on the planer I feed them through on a piece of 3/4 real flat plywood with a small rail ( about 1/16 high) on the front and butt them against it when feeding the material through. I think the DF tape would be even better. you wold have to be careful peeling it off not to break the thin wood. Some of that tape is pretty aggressive.

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

294 posts in 3597 days


#2 posted 04-08-2019 09:44 AM



Only one way to find out! It seems logical that it will work.
When I want to cut 1/8 “or 1/4” pieces on the planer I feed them through on a piece of 3/4 real flat plywood with a small rail ( about 1/16 high) on the front and butt them against it when feeding the material through. I think the DF tape would be even better. you wold have to be careful peeling it off not to break the thin wood. Some of that tape is pretty aggressive.

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh


I think you mean to attach a small rail at the end? This is how I have seen it done. It will prevent the planer blades from pushing the thin piece back. Or maybe use both, wouldn’t hurt either.

Either way, it’s a common method to plane down thin pieces. I have done it, it works. Just make sure your bottom piece that supports the strip is flat and has parallel faces (plywood makes this easy).

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

475 posts in 110 days


#3 posted 04-08-2019 10:30 AM

Folks often use a planner sled for various reasons: only a portion of the bottom is flat as the part exceeds the capacity of the jointer, they have use shims to hold it level as they don’t have a jointer, or the part is too thin to be fed through their planner. You should be fine and you may not even need the tape. I never use it.

View dbw's profile

dbw

270 posts in 1967 days


#4 posted 04-08-2019 11:58 AM

At the end (back). Not at the front. I use both tape and rail.

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5458 posts in 2824 days


#5 posted 04-08-2019 12:16 PM

I’ve tried this a few times, and it didn’t always work that well (for me) unless you tape the front (the back rail is also a good idea). It depended on the wood, but without taping the front down the planer cutters tried to lift the front a little causing a mess on the leading 6-8 inches.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Thalweg's profile

Thalweg

100 posts in 3737 days


#6 posted 04-08-2019 03:15 PM

I do this sort of thing regularly. Although I use 3/4” plywood or melamine as it is stiffer. I hold it down with hot glue instead of tape. The glue pops off pretty easily with a chisel when you’re done. I hot glue shims underneath the high spots of the board I’m surfacing so nothing can move. Sometimes you can just use a glop of hot glue for a shim. Just let it completely cool before moving anything. Any residual hot glue comes off when I plane the opposite side.

It sounds like a lot of work, and sometimes it is, but I can do wide boards like this that are too wide for my 6” jointer.

On second review of the original post, I see you’re just talking about thicknessing a thin piece of wood. That being the case, shims wouldn’t be relevant, and hot glue could damage the thin material. Tape would be better, but the principle is the same.

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

189 posts in 790 days


#7 posted 04-08-2019 04:00 PM



At the end (back). Not at the front. I use both tape and rail.

- dbw

Seems like the block would be at the front since the rollers are pulling on the top piece (planed wood), aren’t they? The block would need to pull the sled not push the planed board. Just my opinion.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View clin's profile

clin

1020 posts in 1327 days


#8 posted 04-08-2019 04:54 PM


At the end (back). Not at the front. I use both tape and rail.

- dbw

Seems like the block would be at the front since the rollers are pulling on the top piece (planed wood), aren t they? The block would need to pull the sled not push the planed board. Just my opinion.

- MikeDilday

I think there might be confusion on what people mean by front and back. But you are correct, the cleat can only be useful when on the “leading” edge of a planer sled; the end fed in first.

So many people get this backwards that it’s pretty good proof a cleat isn’t even needed. If the friction between the wood and sled is greater than the sled and planer bed (usually very smooth and often waxed), the sled is going to pull right along with the wood. Though the sled could skew sideways and its edge rub the sides of the planer, perhaps creating more drag where a cleat would help.

I have a question on this topic. Having never planed thin wood, 1/4” or even 1/8” would seem to me to still be plenty thick to run through on it’s own. What exactly does a sled do in this case? Seems to me the planer bed is going to do anything a sled would do. To be clear, I’m talking about wood that is already flat.

-- Clin

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

475 posts in 110 days


#9 posted 04-08-2019 07:30 PM


I have a question on this topic. Having never planed thin wood, 1/4” or even 1/8” would seem to me to still be plenty thick to run through on it s own. What exactly does a sled do in this case? Seems to me the planer bed is going to do anything a sled would do. To be clear, I m talking about wood that is already flat.

- clin

My 15” grizzly reaches a minimum at 1/4”...just won’t go lower and the force is pretty intense (pressure from the rollers) so even that thin is questionable as it deflects.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5458 posts in 2824 days


#10 posted 04-08-2019 07:46 PM

I have a question on this topic. Having never planed thin wood, 1/4” or even 1/8” would seem to me to still be plenty thick to run through on it s own. What exactly does a sled do in this case? Seems to me the planer bed is going to do anything a sled would do. To be clear, I m talking about wood that is already flat.

- clin

Well, it may be different depending on the planer. But on mine (Delta 15”) the wood is supported a small distance off the bed (underneath the cutterhead) by 2 rollers, and those rollers are on the plane of the infeed/outfeed tables. So if you fed really thin stock in it would flex down as the cutters engaged it; and I’m not sure what problems would ensure…but there would be some. Less important, the other thing (to me) is I really don’t want my knives that close to the bed.

PS, geez, hope that made sense.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

609 posts in 1433 days


#11 posted 04-09-2019 01:51 AM

I have done this numerous times and it was not always successful. In my experience, 1/8 is about the limit for how thin to go. Pieces that thin will usually shatter about 50% of the time. 1/4” is usually not much of a problem. I’ve found that to be successful, you need to use a good double sided tape and cover the entire surface of the work piece. Otherwise, the blades will tend to lift the work piece and chop it into little pieces. Also, make sure that the surfaces that the tape will stick to are smooth enough for the tape to completely stick. Assuming you are successful, you will need to take great care removing the tape. You may need to use a solvent of some kind to release the adhesive.

View BB1's profile

BB1

1353 posts in 1179 days


#12 posted 04-09-2019 02:00 AM

Lots to consider. Thank you for all the comments. Will continue to review and hope to find some time next weekend to practice my resaw technique on my bandsaw and then deal with getting the faces smooth.

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