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Which jointer?

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Forum topic by pi9 posted 04-07-2019 02:02 AM 695 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pi9

18 posts in 327 days


04-07-2019 02:02 AM

Looking on my local CL, I found 2 jointers, a Grizzly and a Delta.

The Grizzly is a go452 with spiral cutter.

Don’t have a model number on the Delta yet but looks like a common model.

Both 6” Is the grizzly worth a little more than double the price?

https://jacksonville.craigslist.org/tls/d/jacksonville-delta-6-jointer/6858585091.html

https://jacksonville.craigslist.org/tls/d/jacksonville-delta-6-jointer/6858585091.html


18 replies so far

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avsmusic1

564 posts in 1296 days


#1 posted 04-07-2019 02:37 AM

The links are the same

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pi9

18 posts in 327 days


#2 posted 04-07-2019 02:39 AM

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avsmusic1

564 posts in 1296 days


#3 posted 04-07-2019 03:23 AM

Looks like the grizzly may have a longer fence and it’s got a built in mobile base which is nice (assuming you need to move it ever)

Given those points and the cutter head I’d probably take a look at the grizzly first personally. I don’t think the helical head is a must in a jointer but it’s certainly nice to not have to worry too much about reading grain and whatnot when feeding. It’s probably easier to resell if u decide in a yr or 2 that u want an 8”

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therealSteveN

4670 posts in 1185 days


#4 posted 04-07-2019 03:32 AM

Skirted the Griz will do a much better job toward dust/chip pickup. the spiral is easily worth 250 bux by itself, normal pricing on 6” retrofits are around 300+. It would also appear the Griz is at least a generation newer, maybe nothing in that, but I subtract for age, unlike many who will pay more because of a belief older is better. I am not in that frame of mind that either of these are golden from the Ole Iron point of view. I would imagine at time of purchase the Griz was easily sold for more than the $250 difference between them now. IOW the Griz seller is offering a deal, the Delta seller is selling for not much less than he probably got it for.

-- Think safe, be safe

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RichBolduc

1233 posts in 728 days


#5 posted 04-07-2019 12:31 PM

Yeah I’d go Griz simply for the base and spiral. Hell if I wasn’t 4+ hours from there I’d make an offer on the griz and sell my 6” delta long bed for $250

Rich

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BlueRidgeDog

620 posts in 391 days


#6 posted 04-07-2019 01:42 PM

These are not the same class of equipment. The Grizzly is far and above a better product, but only you know if you need the extra it brings to the table. At that price the Grizzly is also a bargain.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1373 posts in 1520 days


#7 posted 04-07-2019 03:06 PM

Looks like Rule #5 may have kicked in…

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Aj2

2657 posts in 2409 days


#8 posted 04-07-2019 06:10 PM

What are the chances that grizzly jointer will make straight edges? With a mobile base I’m betting it’s been handled from the end of the table. Those small Dt ways are very sensitive and will mess up the infeed table alignment to the outfeed.
Always look at the gib screws and see if someone has been adjusting them. Add in the non adjustable height of the helical head and you know why someone wants it out of their shop.
Good luck anyways. :(

-- Aj

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therealSteveN

4670 posts in 1185 days


#9 posted 04-07-2019 06:44 PM

Pretty much a moot point if a person brought along a chunk of something to run across it, and a square to see if in fact it can make a square cut, but I would think anyone buying something used would do some level of checking to see if what they are looking to buy is worth buying.

For a jointer buy I wouldn’t go looking if I didn’t bring a known straight edge of a minimum 4’, a piece of paper or a small feeler gauge set to check for gap size, a good quality engineers square known to be square, and a stick of the hardest wood I had in the shop.

-- Think safe, be safe

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CWWoodworking

569 posts in 790 days


#10 posted 04-07-2019 07:12 PM

I don’t use a jointer, so forgive my ignorance on this, but what do you do when a board is bigger than 6”?

I use a lot of 1 common oak and I would say 50% is wider than 6. If I used FAS, darn near every board would be wider.

If I were to go back to using one, I wouldn’t consider anything less than 8”.

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pi9

18 posts in 327 days


#11 posted 04-07-2019 09:54 PM

CWWoodworking,

How do you do without?

I have been trying with hand planes and a sled but have not been too excited about my results and it seems to take me much longer than I like to get a flat face. Maybe I need more practice.

Honestly do not want a jointer because of space and money but want quality work.

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CWWoodworking

569 posts in 790 days


#12 posted 04-07-2019 10:20 PM

I buy all lumber planed to thickness with one edge. 90% is so straight, I wouldn’t use a jointer if I had one. The other 10% I use in ways that a small bow doesn’t matter. A very small amount I just pitch if it’s too crooked.

Doing this does have its down falls. Larger panels(dining table) are problematic. You have to work with thicknesses you have.

All in all for what I do, it’s an extremely effective system. Please keep in mind I do this full time, so speed is crucial. My products are also not perfect. I do not make heirloom furniture.

If I just wanted to piddle and make really nice stuff, I’d probably own one.

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pi9

18 posts in 327 days


#13 posted 04-08-2019 02:03 AM

Ok that makes sense.

I just made a top for a desk, (26×40) it took a ton of work to get everything flat for the glue up. I did the glue up in stages, one joint at a time. In the end I ended up with a fairly flat top.

When it put it on my granite island in my kitchen its close but not perfect, there is about a 1/16 to 1/8 inch cup on one end of the top.

I have the thickness of the top down so far though I don’t want to try and flatten anymore because the top will be too thin.

In the end no one will know but me, when I put the clips on to hold the top down I am sure it will pull it down some without distorting the desk base.

BUT I think if I had a jointer I could have made it better by getting the boards flatter to start.

Also I bought this lumber 15/16 straight line rip. But not one piece was flat. Maybe I am too picky and need to lower my standards of flatness or

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CWWoodworking

569 posts in 790 days


#14 posted 04-08-2019 02:22 AM

Is it a cup with the grain or across? Across grain on one end suggests an error in glue up.

40” long isn’t that big. I glue up roughly 30-50 panels/wk that are 2-4 feet in length. I rarely have to check for a bow in boards that short. You might need to find better wood.

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pi9

18 posts in 327 days


#15 posted 04-08-2019 02:30 AM

Across the grain.

It may be the wood or it may be me.

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