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How to store boiled linseed oil

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Forum topic by t4d posted 04-06-2019 07:03 PM 505 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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t4d

3 posts in 44 days


04-06-2019 07:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: blo boiled linseed oil storage

Greetings….....I’m new to these forums and this is my first post.

I’d like to know how to store boiled linseed oil. I have a quart of BLO in a metal can, but the cap is not easy to remove/replace. I was thinking about storing it in a plastic container with a squirt top, like a mustard or ketchup plastic dispenser, but there a couple concerns: 1. is plastic a suitable material for the container, or should it be metal or glass? 2. if using a mustard/ketchup dispenser, will air infiltrate and cause problems with the contents?

-- hobbyist, using mostly hand tools


18 replies so far

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

6506 posts in 3552 days


#1 posted 04-06-2019 07:41 PM

When I buy BLO, the first thing I do is pour it in a quart mason jar. I take a little dab of petroleum jelly and rub all around the lip of the jar, and inside the threaded lid….That keeps the lid from sticking as you pour some in a small container, or dip a small brush into the jar…!! Don’t leave it in the can or it’ll gum up or dry up making it hard to get the lid off. This concept works for me….Don’t know what others do. Some may chime in with their thoughts.! I do the same thing with tung oil after a 50/50 mixture of mineral spirits and tung oil…..!!

-- " At my age, happy hour is a 2 hour nap".....!!

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t4d

3 posts in 44 days


#2 posted 04-06-2019 07:50 PM

I’d like to avoid using a glass container, unless it is necessary. Worried about dropping it (hands slippery with oil) and a big mess to clean up.

Also, I think having a squirt top will allow me to squirt the correct amount onto the rag I use for application. This might be a better solution than dipping a rag into a mason jar. Not sure, what are your thoughts?

-- hobbyist, using mostly hand tools

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1219 posts in 1852 days


#3 posted 04-06-2019 11:34 PM

+1 Jar with tight sealing lid. Little jelly to keep lid loose.

Plastic squeeze bottle will work for short term storage. But any place that oxygen can reach will turn into a hard gooey mess after about 30-60 days. UV light will also cause the oil to darken over time, so keep jars in dark place.

If don’t like using mason jars, need to go hi-tech. Use Nalgene laboratory grade plastic bottles. Thicker lab grade HDPE can store most finishing materials for years with no degradation.
https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=23042&catid=661
The thinner/cheaper transportation grade Nalgene work, just not as long.

Need to purge oxygen from bottle for longest best storage life. Any inert gas works; Bloxygen, nitrogen, argon, etc

All the above is one reason BLO is sold in metal can with small flip top.
Have 8 year old can I knock off the crusty stuff, and use a little once a year. Still works, just a little darker right now.

Cheers!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1794 posts in 520 days


#4 posted 04-07-2019 12:58 AM

I repurpose the plastic oil cans for several items that often get sticky lids
or just for the convenience of the can itself over the store-bought type.
make a label on the printer and stick it to the bottle with spray glue.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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OnhillWW

184 posts in 1590 days


#5 posted 04-07-2019 02:17 AM

These are great, they are easy to portion out any amount you require and they eliminate nearly all the oxygen helping to keep your finish fresh. I use them for true tung oil which may be the worst finish with regards to premature gelling. I transfer 2-3 oz at a time ( my work involves small parts so that is all I need at a time) into small jelly jars for use and the remainder is stored in the bag.

You can buy direct from the manufacturer or Lee Valley also handles them. I do suggest purchasing extra caps ( they are not expensive) as no matter how careful I am I always get dried finish on the threads.

https://www.stoplossbags.com/

JS – I also use old oil bottles for other products, they are very nice as the plastic is thick and the caps are large, seal tight and are robust. Castrol is my oil of choice, the bottles are a lot like the middle one in your post. Also many have a transparent strip running vertically up the bottle to act as a sight glass to judge how full the bottle is .

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

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therealSteveN

2565 posts in 932 days


#6 posted 04-07-2019 04:25 AM

YES to Stop loss bags. I saw them at WoodCraft and never having heard of them before I wanted to check them out a little before plunking down my hard earned~~~~~

The first video I watched is below. 2 of 4 bags failed, with small leaking. Guy sent an e-mail on a Friday, got a phone call from the owner on Saturday, was immediately sent 4 replacement bags, and asked to return the 2 that leaked. I ended up getting some, haven’t had them in use a long enough time to tell if they will be “long term” winnners, but initially no leaks, and the idea sounds sound, as before you cap them off you can squeeze out all the air. I, and the makers of that Bloxygen stuff believe the air causes the drying, gumming, and all the other nasties that ruin all those expensive finishes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwpH_ZXwQX0

I have had previous failure with ALL of the other mentioned choices, so I am hoping these stop loss bags are a good long term solution. I truly believe it’s the air you cap in, after a short while it affects the finishes. My Uncle did Bloxygen over 40 years ago, he’d seal a lid while blowing his “hot air” into the container. Of course his hot air was CO2, and it replaced the moisture found in the O2 he used to trap inside a can

-- Think safe, be safe

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gwilki

292 posts in 1831 days


#7 posted 04-07-2019 05:00 PM

I think the issue using squirt tops will be keeping the air out of the container. For short term, they will likely be fine, but for longer term storage, I would doubt they would work well.
I use screw top jars, not mason type, for all my oils. To keep the airspace to a minimum, I just add water. The oil floats on the water and doesn’t mix. I can replace small quantities oil with equal quantities of water and keep the jars full all the time.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View t4d's profile

t4d

3 posts in 44 days


#8 posted 04-07-2019 05:08 PM



I think the issue using squirt tops will be keeping the air out of the container. For short term, they will likely be fine, but for longer term storage, I would doubt they would work well.
I use screw top jars, not mason type, for all my oils. To keep the airspace to a minimum, I just add water. The oil floats on the water and doesn t mix. I can replace small quantities oil with equal quantities of water and keep the jars full all the time.

- gwilki

Very clever! I was thinking of using marbles to raise the level of the BLO in the container (like we used to do with photographic chemicals), but using water is simply a great idea.

-- hobbyist, using mostly hand tools

View SMP's profile (online now)

SMP

821 posts in 263 days


#9 posted 04-07-2019 05:12 PM

Remove the child lock plastic on the cap, clean the threads with a small screwdriver, spray some pam on the threads. Should last long enough to where you will replace anyways. For $6 a can i wouldn’t spend more time and effort than that.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2565 posts in 932 days


#10 posted 04-07-2019 06:55 PM



I just add water. The oil floats on the water and doesn t mix. I can replace small quantities oil with equal quantities of water and keep the jars full all the time.

- gwilki

Probably there is science in that I am unaware of, but if I had a 35 dollar jar of some oil type finish, I just can’t see myself dumping water into it to raise it’s level. My little twitch thing is going off just thinking of that.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Rich's profile

Rich

4387 posts in 947 days


#11 posted 04-07-2019 06:59 PM


Probably there is science in that I am unaware of, but if I had a 35 dollar jar of some oil type finish, I just can t see myself dumping water into it to raise it s level. My little twitch thing is going off just thinking of that.

- therealSteveN

Big +1 on that. Getting that last two or three ounces of finish out of the can without including water would be pretty sketchy. I’ve seen marbles used, which would work great. Some folks just crush the can, but that only works on the rectangular ones, like Waterlox comes in.

I like Bloxygen I’ve been using it for years with no loss of finish, and getting around 75 applications per can at $10 to $12 is pretty economical.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2565 posts in 932 days


#12 posted 04-07-2019 07:03 PM

I just went and put some cooking oil in a small container, first I filled with water to about 75% full. Topped it off with the oil. As we know no mix of the 2, but trying to pour off the oil was a water deluge. So I guess in principal this works, just how do you decant it, so your Oil finish isn’t floating on top of a sheet of water?

Rich I tried the Bloxygen once, and didn’t get anywhere near that kind of mileage on it, and it isn’t real cheap. I have hope for these bags. My only concern is mixing another finish after you use one up. I’m thinking you will need one for every type of finish you use.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Rich's profile

Rich

4387 posts in 947 days


#13 posted 04-07-2019 08:51 PM


I just went and put some cooking oil in a small container, first I filled with water to about 75% full. Topped it off with the oil. As we know no mix of the 2, but trying to pour off the oil was a water deluge. So I guess in principal this works, just how do you decant it, so your Oil finish isn t floating on top of a sheet of water?

Rich I tried the Bloxygen once, and didn t get anywhere near that kind of mileage on it, and it isn t real cheap. I have hope for these bags. My only concern is mixing another finish after you use one up. I m thinking you will need one for every type of finish you use.

- therealSteveN

Yeah, it almost seems like you’d need one of those fat separators they sell at the cooking stores to get the water out from underneath so you can use the oil without getting mixed.

Re: Bloxygen, remember that argon is heavier than air, so it lays down on the surface. That means you don’t have to displace all of the air in the can. Just about a 2 second shot will be enough to cover the surface of a quart can. More if it’s a gallon. Even if the can is almost empty and it’s all air, it works the same.

Those little bags will surely work. People swear by them. But they’re kind of pricey for my tastes.

I’m surprised we haven’t heard from anyone who uses propane in place of Bloxygen. There’s usually at least one in any thread like this. I always wonder about the wisdom (and intelligence of the person) of using a flammable gas to displace air inside a can of flammable liquid.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

80 posts in 84 days


#14 posted 04-07-2019 09:56 PM

I use air, works great. when the finish gels beyond use I buy new.

View pottz's profile

pottz

4984 posts in 1342 days


#15 posted 04-08-2019 02:44 PM


Probably there is science in that I am unaware of, but if I had a 35 dollar jar of some oil type finish, I just can t see myself dumping water into it to raise it s level. My little twitch thing is going off just thinking of that.

- therealSteveN

Big +1 on that. Getting that last two or three ounces of finish out of the can without including water would be pretty sketchy. I ve seen marbles used, which would work great. Some folks just crush the can, but that only works on the rectangular ones, like Waterlox comes in.

I like Bloxygen I ve been using it for years with no loss of finish, and getting around 75 applications per can at $10 to $12 is pretty economical.

- Rich


+2 adding water sounds like a real problem i dont want to deal with.ive been using the bloxygen for awhile now,seems to work well.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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