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Forum topic by captainmorgan posted 04-06-2019 04:36 AM 2097 views 0 times favorited 55 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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captainmorgan

38 posts in 255 days


04-06-2019 04:36 AM

i only very sporadically have use for pocket screws but I was just building some new extension wings out of 3/4” baltic birch and am SO FED UP that when I was pocket screwing together my joints the last bit of ‘suck up’ from the pull of the screw seems to be puling EVERY JOINT out of alignment – UGH – so I have to try to anticipate how much it’s going to suck it in – typically 3mm or so and then start off with it deliberately misaligned but it seems about as likely as winning a small town lottery as it does to get the joints where i want them? what on EARTH is the solution?? clamping the HELL out of everything first??


55 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8770 posts in 3086 days


#1 posted 04-06-2019 04:41 AM

https://www.kregtool.com/store/c20/kregreg-screws/#tab4818

There’s different screws for different materials ^

Best of luck

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captainmorgan

38 posts in 255 days


#2 posted 04-06-2019 04:45 AM

yes i’m only using fine thread … which i prefer for their greater strength … but given that there must be a way to avoid this problem

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Rich

4993 posts in 1099 days


#3 posted 04-06-2019 05:24 AM

Yes, lots of clamps will do the trick. I fashioned a bunch of right-angle cauls to ensure the boards are square and don’t move. Also, biscuits will keep things in alignment, but I still use the right-angle guides.

-- There are 10 types of people—those who understand binary, and those who don’t

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anthm27

1426 posts in 1619 days


#4 posted 04-06-2019 09:18 AM

Dowels would be my answer.
Regards Anthm

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4183 posts in 2498 days


#5 posted 04-06-2019 10:35 AM

Pocket screws need the right technique and are only as good as the person using them.

You need to clamp them or hold them in the right position.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5748 posts in 3002 days


#6 posted 04-06-2019 10:37 AM

I’ve always clamped the joint tightly, seems to work.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Jared_S

219 posts in 468 days


#7 posted 04-06-2019 12:41 PM

Clamp tightly, or drop the kreg in favor of a castle pocket machine (lower angle holes)

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bondogaposis

5541 posts in 2860 days


#8 posted 04-06-2019 01:07 PM

Set the clutch on your driver so that it stops when the joint is snug.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View lndfilwiz's profile

lndfilwiz

113 posts in 2110 days


#9 posted 04-06-2019 01:12 PM

I use clamps and like bondo I set the clutch to just barely sung the screw.

-- Smile, it makes people wander what you are up to.

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Rayne

1228 posts in 2049 days


#10 posted 04-06-2019 02:47 PM

There are two relatively easy solution.
1) If your workbench is flat, clamp each piece flat on the workbench in their joined state. Can’t move out of alignment if it can’t go anywhere
2) If it’s an awkward joint, parallel clamp will hold the pieces together tight.

I used both techniques when building my miter station recently as I initially forgot about the amount of movement there was when using pocket holes. They have served me well and have not moved out of alignment since.
As for the fine threaded screw in Baltic Birch, I’m assuming you’re talking about Plywood instead of actual Baltic Birch Hardwood? If plywood, I would use coarse threaded screws.

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Madmark2

512 posts in 1097 days


#11 posted 04-06-2019 02:48 PM

Anyone have any luck with a Kreg jig and ready hard hardwoods (like jatoba)?

M

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

322 posts in 1983 days


#12 posted 04-06-2019 04:53 PM

I don’t use them much, but as long as the two pieces to be joined were clamped and tight when the pilot hole was drilled, I’ve never had a problem with the screw pulling the joint out of alignment. The screw can only follow the hole, yes?

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

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Rayne

1228 posts in 2049 days


#13 posted 04-06-2019 06:16 PM



I don t use them much, but as long as the two pieces to be joined were clamped and tight when the pilot hole was drilled, I ve never had a problem with the screw pulling the joint out of alignment. The screw can only follow the hole, yes?

- gwilki


There’s no hole in the receiving piece and due to the angle of the pocket, it will push the joint out of alignment if not mitigated.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3886 posts in 1083 days


#14 posted 04-06-2019 06:50 PM

Clamps…..

This is the answer to worry about the parts moving as the screws pull the stock together. I’m guessing this is why they also sell all of the different spanner clamps they do with one side shaped perfectly to fit into the hole. Heck they even have “auto adjust”


Anyone have any luck with a Kreg jig and ready hard hardwoods (like jatoba)?

M

- Madmark2

With any of the REALLY hard woods it is advisable to drill a tiny hole (big enough to just undersize the shank of the screw, but not drill out where the threads will go) into the wood prior to using screws. This on a Kreg jig would be twofold, it will keep the wood from cracking, if close to an edge, and it will keep the wood pieces from shifting wildly as you pull the screw tight, effectively “pulling” it to where you want it to go, rather than where the grain wants to send you. Here obviously clamps are going to be necessary. Near edges, you still want to allow as much room as you can to keep them from cracking. General rule of thumb is the harder the wood, the further away from the edge. On Lignum Vitae I’ll not get closer then 1/2” of an inch and would prefer never closer than 3/4”. Obvious issues such as knots, and crazy burl grains will widen that quite a bit.

Rayne said…

“As for the fine threaded screw in Baltic Birch, I’m assuming you’re talking about Plywood instead of actual Baltic Birch Hardwood? If plywood, I would use coarse threaded screws.”

Absolutely, coarse screws on any soft wood, or plywood. Even if the wood it comes from is hard as a rock, in ply you are only seeing smallish cross sections of it, the course threaded screws will help keep you from tearing out.

Essentially:

Coarse threads = better grab works in any wood that may be soft, or prone to tearing.

Fine screws = ok grab, stronger screws less prone to snapping. This works best for hard hardwoods, pretty much anything from hard Maple on up can/will snap off your classic coarse threaded screws. Especially w/o a pilot hole.

-- Think safe, be safe

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2818 days


#15 posted 04-06-2019 07:38 PM



Anyone have any luck with a Kreg jig and ready hard hardwoods (like jatoba)?

M

- Madmark2


Yes.

When I did my Blood Wood Kitchen and a Hickory kitchen I use Pocket screws for the face frames.

I took a piece of 3/8 round rod and made me a special pilot hole drilling what Whatchamacallit. I drilled the pocket hole as always the then clamp the pieces together and ran a pilot hole into the other piece. It worked well. I also used the self drilling fine thread screws.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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