LumberJocks

is this safe

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by Karda posted 04-05-2019 09:59 PM 486 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Karda's profile

Karda

1486 posts in 918 days


04-05-2019 09:59 PM

I am turning a bowl but it has a major right through the center will a tenon or recess hold or is it fire wood


14 replies so far

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

437 posts in 1442 days


#1 posted 04-05-2019 10:08 PM

How much $$ invested? What species? Fix with epoxy and work slow if you proceed.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7361 posts in 2563 days


#2 posted 04-05-2019 10:20 PM

Looks fine to me… use a tenon though (or maybe even better, a glue block)... outward pressure in a recess would probably be a bad idea.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Karda's profile

Karda

1486 posts in 918 days


#3 posted 04-05-2019 11:15 PM

no money involved, it black walnut. I never thought of a glue block. Ill do that or a tenon. Thanks mike

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2255 posts in 2353 days


#4 posted 04-06-2019 12:05 AM

If it were mine – looks like the pith may be in the top of the blank – I would inspect for other cracks, it is walnut which loves to crack. If I went on, I’d probably go with a tenon since the crack is deep, so I could take more crack out. Now start filling the crack with ca – leave some trim space on the tenon to cut the glue off. I’d put some thin ca into the crack let it soak in well, put more thin ca followed by medium ca, using accelerator, more medium and accelerator till I fairly well filled the crack, knowing some is coming off when finishing the shape.

JMO put more curve into the side of the bowl.

View socrbent's profile

socrbent

852 posts in 2633 days


#5 posted 04-06-2019 01:50 AM

I suggest you pull a Howarth (after YouTuber Frank Howarth) by measuring diameter, then cutting an inch or so wide strip out containing the crack leaving you with two halves. Create a replacement for cracked piece from a contrasting wood. glue the 3 pieces together with a glue block, mount and finish turning as you desire.

-- socrbent Ohio

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1536 posts in 2094 days


#6 posted 04-06-2019 02:14 AM

Use a tenon. It will clamp it across the crack, and turn it with more curve as OSU55 stats. You might actually remove most of the cracks. .......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Karda's profile

Karda

1486 posts in 918 days


#7 posted 04-06-2019 03:13 AM

how about epoxy, the crack is deep in some places. It is slant sided now, I was thinking a deep cove, how deep depends on the width of the foot. I want an ogee but I just can’t do them. I always end up with a straight where its supposed to cove or a witches cauldron shape. Nobody has ever accused me of being creative.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2255 posts in 2353 days


#8 posted 04-06-2019 02:16 PM

depends on the viscosity of the epoxy. If you have low viscosity, so it fully fills to the bottom of the crack, ok. I only have the hi viscosity type that wont, and use ca instead. As for shape, just keep working at it. You dont have to create the shape completely by cutting with the tip of a gouge. The shape can be finished or completely formed with scraping, either with gouge wings or a scraper tool – might help you create the shape you want by slowly removing material.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117618 posts in 3941 days


#9 posted 04-06-2019 02:37 PM

I’m not a turning expert but as far as safety goes if in doubt scrape it,how good will it look with epoxy or Ca to repair it anyhow?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FxqB9CPeJ0

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1536 posts in 2094 days


#10 posted 04-06-2019 02:43 PM

Mike, here is a picture of a piece I just finished yesterday. I fully expected it to come apart, especially when I only had a small nub with my live center point dead center of the crack. Mesquite burl dead at least since the very late ‘60’s.
The crack appeared when I first roughed it. I used a little thin CA along the entire crack. It held up real well until I started getting nervous, and doused it with more CA.

The piece you are showing looks like you could rough it to the shape you want, and then apply whatever material you wish to use.

I personally am having doubts of using epoxy along a wet crack. The wood is still wet and moving. Applying epoxy along that crack will in my opinion only, more than likely stick to the wood. But if the wood is still cracking, it could be a wasted batch of epoxy.

It looks like the cracks don’t go too far up into the blank. get whatever tool you are comfy with, and start working on an outside shape, then turn it around and hog out to the 10% thickness. Set it aside and wait for it to dry more before you try to save it. You could do the same to the other one you’re working. If you have more wood stashed, do what you can for roughing them, and let them sit for at least 3-4 months.

If the cracks do reach the rim, toss it or them and start more if your health allows…... .Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Karda's profile

Karda

1486 posts in 918 days


#11 posted 04-06-2019 04:22 PM

ok thanks Jerry I’ll give that a shot

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

293 posts in 1837 days


#12 posted 04-06-2019 04:46 PM

Is this the same piece that you posted under the pedestal bowl topic? If so, as I said there, I would toss it.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2255 posts in 2353 days


#13 posted 04-06-2019 08:36 PM

I wasn’t thinking wet wood earlier, and I should heve been since it is in the rough turning stage. I agree with Jerry, if the wood is wet ca is a better choice. They way thin ca wicks into the wood fibers adds a lot of strength to the whole area of the crack which is why I prefer it to epoxy in a situation like this.

View Karda's profile

Karda

1486 posts in 918 days


#14 posted 04-06-2019 09:03 PM

ok

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com