LumberJocks

Wedding Arch Stabilization

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by I_love_lamp posted 04-04-2019 01:21 AM 359 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View I_love_lamp's profile

I_love_lamp

9 posts in 357 days


04-04-2019 01:21 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip joining

Hi all,

I’m in the process of building the arch for my upcoming wedding and wanted some input on the placement of the stabilization rails(?) I will be putting in at the bottom. The shape of the arch is a hexagon approximately 7ft tall and the joints of the hexagon are attached with glue and dowels. It will look similar to the first 2 pics in the link below:
https://www.rustic-events.com/rentals/arches-chuppahs

The difference between the one pictured in the link and mine will be that instead of lengthening out the bottom parallel to the hexagon as in the linked picture I want to use two boards that run perpendicular to the hexagon preventing the arch from tipping forward or backward.

My questions is, should I place the two perpendicular boards at the edges or move them in 1/4th of the way? Also how long should I make these perpendicular boards?

I plan on attaching the perpendicular boards to the hexagon using lap joints with glue.
Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!


9 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

728 posts in 1519 days


#1 posted 04-04-2019 07:33 PM

I would mount them as close to the corners as possible for stability. Also, this would provide more standing room without stepping on them. The length will depend on several factors. If the wedding will be indoors, on a level surface, and with no wind, they can be shorter. If outdoors on grass or other less firm or uneven surface, they may need to be longer. I suggest that you make a mock-up and test it.

If the wedding will be on turf or sand and if it would be permissible, you might include some stakes driven into the ground that the arch could be screwed or clamped to. This could replace or supplement the perpendicular “feet”.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5452 posts in 2768 days


#2 posted 04-04-2019 09:28 PM

If you are going to be using it outdoors put some holes in the stabilizers so you can drive a stake through it for additional stability.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View I_love_lamp's profile

I_love_lamp

9 posts in 357 days


#3 posted 04-05-2019 12:18 AM

Thank you both for your replies. I should have added this will be an indoor event on concrete. Doing the feet more in the corners for added standing room sounds good and I didn’t know that this would also increase the stability of the arch, that’s good to know.

Knowing this will be an indoor wedding, how short do you think I can get away with the perpendicular board length being? The size of the structure is 7ft in diameter built with 2×4’s. Each board is jointed with glue and one hardwood dowel.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

728 posts in 1519 days


#4 posted 04-05-2019 02:03 AM

That is very difficult to say without knowing how well balanced it will be. If lots of ornamentation is attached, it could become top heavy and therefore need bigger “feet”. Testing it with a mock-up would help you find the answer. You also must consider what happens if someone bumps into it. Also consider adding some weight, like sand bags, to the feet and cover them with carpet or something. Or, make a pair of box like bases as part of the design. These could hold some weights.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3073 posts in 991 days


#5 posted 04-05-2019 03:52 AM

I think whoever made the one you like put the larger foot on it, is because that works. Or a smaller foot with weight on it. Putting up props can work, but with an item that irregularly shaped, and weighted doing the prop thing could end poorly if said prop was bumped from the side.

Let’s see…..Your wedding…..lot’s of people milling about having a good time….drinks maybe…..Oppps Uncle John just booted the prop…....Man down, we got a Man down…There is a picture of you sleeping outside on your wedding night….....

Make it the way you see it, re-invent wheels for any other day of your life.

All of that was my wife, 38+ years of saying yes Dear…... No killer props yet.

-- Think safe, be safe

View I_love_lamp's profile

I_love_lamp

9 posts in 357 days


#6 posted 04-05-2019 04:43 AM


I think whoever made the one you like put the larger foot on it, is because that works. Or a smaller foot with weight on it. Putting up props can work, but with an item that irregularly shaped, and weighted doing the prop thing could end poorly if said prop was bumped from the side.

Let s see…..Your wedding…..lot s of people milling about having a good time….drinks maybe…..Oppps Uncle John just booted the prop…....Man down, we got a Man down…There is a picture of you sleeping outside on your wedding night….....

Make it the way you see it, re-invent wheels for any other day of your life.

All of that was my wife, 38+ years of saying yes Dear…... No killer props yet.

- therealSteveN

Haha I’m assuming this is satire. Or I’m pretty sure you didn’t read my post all the way through bc my design is for sure more sound than the pic I presented. If you bump the arch I pictured from either the front or back it’s going down. If you do that for the design I’m proposing it wont. If this is not satire, thanks for your advice but I’m pretty confident in the structure of the arch compared to the one in the picture I presented due to the other arch’s lack of perpendicular support. I’m just looking for input on the idea to make the footprint smaller in regards to the perpendicular boards.
Please read before posting, I tried to explain it as simple as possible.

View I_love_lamp's profile

I_love_lamp

9 posts in 357 days


#7 posted 04-05-2019 04:46 AM



That is very difficult to say without knowing how well balanced it will be. If lots of ornamentation is attached, it could become top heavy and therefore need bigger “feet”. Testing it with a mock-up would help you find the answer. You also must consider what happens if someone bumps into it. Also consider adding some weight, like sand bags, to the feet and cover them with carpet or something. Or, make a pair of box like bases as part of the design. These could hold some weights.

- bilyo

Oh nice, I really like the idea of using a box like base as part of the design. Weight shouldn’t be much… maybe 15 pounds at the absolute most.

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

837 posts in 2916 days


#8 posted 04-05-2019 08:42 AM

“Also consider adding some weight, like sand bags, to the feet and cover them with carpet or something”

I would disguise the weight in flower bed.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View I_love_lamp's profile

I_love_lamp

9 posts in 357 days


#9 posted 04-05-2019 08:54 PM



“Also consider adding some weight, like sand bags, to the feet and cover them with carpet or something”

I would disguise the weight in flower bed.

- Sylvain

Totally agree. We’re going to use greenery and some flowers to help hide them.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com