LumberJocks

Temporary Walls

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by stfinney posted 04-03-2019 08:27 PM 420 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View stfinney's profile

stfinney

12 posts in 107 days


04-03-2019 08:27 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wood oak wall

Hey all, I have some temporary walls using oak plywood and oak strips that I made for a local restaurant that hook to a brick wall and to each other using metal brackets made for bed rails. They work good but the only problem is that they are heavy for the servers to carry and snap back together. My question is, do you have any ideas for something better?? At the time, this was all I could think of that matched the decor. I would like to remake them using something that is lighter but still maintains some strength. They are used as a separator/barrier when eating but removed when the 2 sections are pushed together for larger parties. I would love some ideas please, thanks!


14 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#1 posted 04-03-2019 08:40 PM

I have seen similar restaurants that accommodate larger dining parties
without the partitions and it appears everyone has a good time.
(Golden Corral, Sonny’s BBQ, steak houses, etc.)
I would eliminate the “temporary” partitions all together if switching
them around is a problem.

how thick is the plywood ??
I would try for lighter wood like a 4” box-type cedar frame with 1/4” luan plywood skin.
it would have more bulk, sit more firmly on the floor, and when attached to the wall,
should be just as sturdy (or more) than a single panel.
(or hire bigger, stronger servers).

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View HackFabrication's profile

HackFabrication

140 posts in 130 days


#2 posted 04-03-2019 09:20 PM

Rather than a re-design, consider fabricating up some sort of wheeled cart to move them around on. Something like a dolly, but with casters on it. I’m thinking a seriously downsized version of what you see at Home Depot or Lowe’s that you can stack plywood into. Only need to lift them up a couple of inches (keeping them vertical), to get them on the platform and wheel them off to wherever they are stored when not in use.

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5452 posts in 2770 days


#3 posted 04-03-2019 09:37 PM

Use frame and panel construction with 1/4” plywood.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2988 posts in 3856 days


#4 posted 04-03-2019 10:01 PM



Use frame and panel construction with 1/4” plywood.

- bondogaposis

Ya, what I thought.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View DS's profile

DS

3197 posts in 2839 days


#5 posted 04-03-2019 10:46 PM

It is typical, in commercial partitions, to use a corrugated core with a veneer over that.

Something like this;

It is super lightweight and really strong (>200lbs crush strength) and takes KD fasteners just fine.

On the downside, it actually costs more than traditional plywood (for the good stuff) and you have to edge it with inset lumber so your fasteners and trim will hold.

If you have an office cubicle, you have seen this product.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View stfinney's profile

stfinney

12 posts in 107 days


#6 posted 04-03-2019 11:24 PM

Yes, it is 3/4” oak plywood right now. Per the clients request, they want to keep the walls and customers want them there. It’s a BBQ restaurant and the servers are not always in the best mood, hence the need for strength. I have no problem making a channel for something to set into, like the cardboard idea. That actually sounds really doable. I am not sure on the 1/4” plywood as the 3/4” that I have now has some good sized dents from them hitting it with the granite top tables. Also, it has to be about 50” high at the most, so custom is key.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1494 posts in 1913 days


#7 posted 04-04-2019 07:10 AM

+1 – if light weight is super important, use light weight core.
Honeycomb is expensive. Cheapest office furniture uses FOAM board, laminated with heavy paper for impact durability, then fabric for noise reduction.
In wood application, use 1” foam board, 1/8” luan ply skin. Edge the foam with lumber (ply on top of both, and it looks/acts like plywood barrier, except it weighs about same as 1/4 ply barrier.


It is typical, in commercial partitions, to use a corrugated core with a veneer over that.

Something like this;

It is super lightweight and really strong (>200lbs crush strength) and takes KD fasteners just fine.

On the downside, it actually costs more than traditional plywood (for the good stuff) and you have to edge it with inset lumber so your fasteners and trim will hold.

If you have an office cubicle, you have seen this product.

- DS


-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View DS's profile

DS

3197 posts in 2839 days


#8 posted 04-04-2019 03:25 PM

Perhaps, a wood-grained plastic laminate on a corrugated core and trimmed with solid wood would be more durable?

P.S. Corrugated cores come in many varied thicknesses. 1 1/4” to 1 1/2” thick is common for this type of partition.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View stfinney's profile

stfinney

12 posts in 107 days


#9 posted 04-04-2019 10:35 PM



+1 – if light weight is super important, use light weight core.
Honeycomb is expensive. Cheapest office furniture uses FOAM board, laminated with heavy paper for impact durability, then fabric for noise reduction.
In wood application, use 1” foam board, 1/8” luan ply skin. Edge the foam with lumber (ply on top of both, and it looks/acts like plywood barrier, except it weighs about same as 1/4 ply barrier.

It is typical, in commercial partitions, to use a corrugated core with a veneer over that.

Something like this;

It is super lightweight and really strong (>200lbs crush strength) and takes KD fasteners just fine.

On the downside, it actually costs more than traditional plywood (for the good stuff) and you have to edge it with inset lumber so your fasteners and trim will hold.

If you have an office cubicle, you have seen this product.

- DS

- CaptainKlutz

I like that idea too, I am not sure why I never thought of using foam board with 1/4” plywood on both sides. They have it in oak too so it would match with what we have now.

View stfinney's profile

stfinney

12 posts in 107 days


#10 posted 04-04-2019 10:37 PM

Another thing too, I would love to have just 1 section instead of 2, making it easier to take out and put back. Do you guys thing earth magnets would be strong enough to hold the walls in place????

View DS's profile

DS

3197 posts in 2839 days


#11 posted 04-04-2019 11:01 PM

Why wouldn’t it work as a single piece?

I wouldn’t trust magnets for this, but, I would still try to make it one piece.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View wood2woodknot's profile

wood2woodknot

101 posts in 2392 days


#12 posted 04-05-2019 02:35 AM

plastic 4’ x 8’ lattice garden panels with a fabric skin ???

-- ajh

View stfinney's profile

stfinney

12 posts in 107 days


#13 posted 04-05-2019 02:40 AM



Why wouldn t it work as a single piece?

I wouldn t trust magnets for this, but, I would still try to make it one piece.

- DS

I am worried about their storage space. I need to keep it as small a footprint as possible. I need to see how much room they have, but I am sure it will work.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3092 posts in 993 days


#14 posted 04-05-2019 02:52 AM

Something like this maybe
You need solid wood to wrap it, and give it a frame. Suppose you could cut a dado in the solid stuff to inset this panel. You could wrap it with a fabric to please the customer. Put together so it was designed to come apart you could wash or replace the fabric as needed. Guaranteed to weigh less than 3/4” Oak ply.

-- Think safe, be safe

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com