LumberJocks

my first pedestal bowl

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by Karda posted 04-02-2019 05:32 PM 828 views 0 times favorited 46 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Karda's profile

Karda

1482 posts in 911 days


04-02-2019 05:32 PM

Hi, haven’t been able to turn in a while, started back a little. This is where iam at on my first pedestal bowl Why does it look dumb and what can I do better.


46 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2620 posts in 2491 days


#1 posted 04-02-2019 07:16 PM

Assume wood is Poplar with a pith small crack that’s not very big. You do need sharper tools so can remove those tool marks going from early late wood or vice versus. Also need to reduce or make the pedestal skinnier making it less chucky.

Your mileage may vary.

-- Bill

View Karda's profile

Karda

1482 posts in 911 days


#2 posted 04-02-2019 10:15 PM

wood is black walnut, I’ll work on sharping. I put a 40/40 grind on my 5/8th gouge and I am not used to it yet. that finish is after I cleaned it up with my bottom gouge 70 degrees thanks i’ll reduce the foot and see what happens

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

292 posts in 1830 days


#3 posted 04-03-2019 12:48 PM

Since you asked why it look “dumb”, I’ll address that question and hope you are not offended. IMHO, it looks dumb because the shape is all wrong. You have a nice curve going from the rim to where you headed due south. If you want the bowl to sit up off a table and not sit on a bottom that would naturally flow from your curve, that “pedestal” needs to be much smaller and much shorter.

Take a look at this Jimmy Clewes’ Youtube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNDxDHShOL8.

His shape is different than yours, but the idea of having the bowl sit on a foot is the same concept you are looking for, I think.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View Karda's profile

Karda

1482 posts in 911 days


#4 posted 04-03-2019 09:11 PM

thanks, not offended i asked. I can understand a smaller foot but why shorter. I’ll watch that video again. I don’t watch many of his because usually they are about coloring or other embellishments

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

436 posts in 1435 days


#5 posted 04-03-2019 09:18 PM

K: If you google “Classic”, “Greek”, “Ancient” pottery you can see the shapes that have survived all these years and compare one to another until you get the shape you are after.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

660 posts in 1658 days


#6 posted 04-03-2019 09:33 PM

I agree with Jack and often do a search for ideas. Here is a search under images for “pedestal bowl woodturning”.

https://www.google.com/search?q=pedestal+bowl+woodturning&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS766US766&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjVr63u7rThAhVtleAKHcvrB8oQ_AUIDygC&biw=1250&bih=578&dpr=1.5

For me a “normal” bowl has a base about 1/3 the diameter; with a pedestal style I would go with about 40% to add more stability. Pedestal can be short or long, skinny or fat, as shown.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Karda's profile

Karda

1482 posts in 911 days


#7 posted 04-04-2019 03:27 AM

thanks for the search suggestions that gives me a lot of ideas. This is where I am at now. I need to scrape more before sanding I might put dowels in those knots they are kinda crumblythe top has to come down at least a half inch the one on the foot I’m no\t sure yet.

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

292 posts in 1830 days


#8 posted 04-04-2019 02:00 PM

@Karda: It’s all personal taste, of course, and I am not know for mine. :-)

However, if you want to keep a tall pedestal on this piece, I would suggest that you go for something like the attached pic. Again, just my opinion.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

648 posts in 1459 days


#9 posted 04-04-2019 02:34 PM

Karda, I hate that you used the word “dumb” to describe your work. Don’t do that. You are trying, observing, and learning. That is smart. It is what we all must do to advance. You have gotten some good advice above on studying historical work to help train your eye (mind). Then keep on turning.

On a practical note: If this will be more than a practice piece, consider cutting off the top to remove the small area of pith. This area has already started to split and will likely split more as time goes on.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

436 posts in 1435 days


#10 posted 04-04-2019 03:55 PM



I agree with Jack and often do a search for ideas. Here is a search under images for “pedestal bowl woodturning”.

https://www.google.com/search?q=pedestal+bowl+woodturning&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS766US766&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjVr63u7rThAhVtleAKHcvrB8oQ_AUIDygC&biw=1250&bih=578&dpr=1.5

For me a “normal” bowl has a base about 1/3 the diameter; with a pedestal style I would go with about 40% to add more stability. Pedestal can be short or long, skinny or fat, as shown.

- LeeMills


I agree with Jack and often do a search for ideas. Here is a search under images for “pedestal bowl woodturning”.

https://www.google.com/search?q=pedestal+bowl+woodturning&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS766US766&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjVr63u7rThAhVtleAKHcvrB8oQ_AUIDygC&biw=1250&bih=578&dpr=1.5

For me a “normal” bowl has a base about 1/3 the diameter; with a pedestal style I would go with about 40% to add more stability. Pedestal can be short or long, skinny or fat, as shown.

- LeeMills

Excellent link Lee!

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View Karda's profile

Karda

1482 posts in 911 days


#11 posted 04-04-2019 09:12 PM

thanks for the suggestions what gwilki pictured is what I am aiming for but the bowl will much shallower because the wood s not that tall and I have to take down the pith on the top. This is just practise but I still want to do the best I can

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

436 posts in 1435 days


#12 posted 04-04-2019 11:39 PM

Save the pith! that is a beautiful feature.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View Karda's profile

Karda

1482 posts in 911 days


#13 posted 04-05-2019 12:50 AM

yea it is a beautiful feature till it starts cracking, I don’t dare turn bowl. I went down to turn and a lot of cracks are radiating from that pith and another big on the other side. I don’t like to deal with pith because it crack when u don’t want it to. I not so smart that I can deal with large cracks.. Most of my other wood is cracked, very discouraging

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

292 posts in 1830 days


#14 posted 04-05-2019 12:29 PM

I completely agree with Bilyo. Nothing you have done is “dumb”. Give yourself a break. We’ve all been where you are. Hell, I still am.
You’ve picked a challenging shape with a difficult blank. I would turn out the pith at the rim, as you will not lose much depth and you will remove one source of cracking. You have some cracking from the knot near where your foot starts. If you turn some of that away to get to the final shape of your foot, you may well lose some of the cracks. You can fill those that remain with CA glue and shavings/dust from your turning.
As I’m sure you know, you need to be giving some thought now to how you are going to hold it to hollow it out. It looks like you are holding it from the top on a faceplate right now. What is your plan to reverse it? One thing to consider, no matter how you plan to hold it from the base is that you don’t want the “spindle” between the bottom of the bowl and the foot to be too small. It would not take too much to sheer it off when hollowing out the bowl.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View Karda's profile

Karda

1482 posts in 911 days


#15 posted 04-05-2019 07:48 PM

here is what I found when i went to turn. This walnut was cut wrong, he cut down the middle of the pith I would have removed it. I have a recess to turn it around

showing 1 through 15 of 46 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com