LumberJocks

Alternative to the Bosch 12" mitre saw for accuracy?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Grasshopper069 posted 04-02-2019 03:36 PM 3043 views 0 times favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Grasshopper069's profile

Grasshopper069

21 posts in 81 days


04-02-2019 03:36 PM

Hey folks, I have a Bosch 12” double bevel gliding mitre saw and I’ve seen some posts on this, but no matter what I do I can’t get it to make consistent, true cuts at 90 or 45 degrees no matter what I do. I’ve calibrated it many times, when it’s good at 0, it’s not true at 45 and vice versa. I think I’ve explored all my options for getting this thing to cut accurately, so my question to you is which other mitre saws in your experience are dead-on accurate, and repeatedly so? I like the capacity of the 12” saws, but not sure if the double bevel feature introduces unwanted variance or if single bevels are better, etc. And of course, brands you recommend are welcome. Thanks so much.

Bart

P.S. If anyone wants a good 12” Bosch for less accurate work, it does work well except for the accuracy needed for furniture, picture frames, etc. Probably fine for rough cuts, framing, etc. Let me know, I’m in the New Orleans area and will likely be selling soon.


33 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2205 posts in 2160 days


#1 posted 04-02-2019 04:27 PM

Are you using a good blade the factory one isn’t.

-- Aj

View Grasshopper069's profile

Grasshopper069

21 posts in 81 days


#2 posted 04-02-2019 06:13 PM

Thanks Aj, it’s a Diablo 80 tooth blade. I need to take it out and make sure it’s not bent but I don’t think that’s the problem. Thanks for helping me cover my bases on ruling things out. I really would hate to get rid of it and have to search for another but inconsistent cuts are driving me up a wall.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2205 posts in 2160 days


#3 posted 04-02-2019 06:21 PM

Ok that’s good. I haven’t tried the Diablo blade on my Bosch if it’s a full 1/8 kerf it should be better then the one that comes with the saw.
Good luck

-- Aj

View Sawdust35's profile

Sawdust35

57 posts in 1225 days


#4 posted 04-02-2019 06:24 PM

Grasshopper069 I have the Bosch Axial glide 12”. I had a freud 96 tooth blade and its runout was twice that of my Forrest Chopmaster. That being said, when I do a long cross cut I still need to be steady with my hand to minimize lateral movement takes place during cut. The Forrest blade made a big difference in the squareness and cleanliness of the cut. Based on the reviews I have read and podcasts I have listened to, one miter saw that could outperform the Bosch is the Kapex ($1500).

View Grasshopper069's profile

Grasshopper069

21 posts in 81 days


#5 posted 04-02-2019 06:25 PM

Will do. I’ll take it off and check it anyway. I does make smooth cuts, just not accurate. I’ll continue trying to rule out operator error, but it shouldn’t be this hard to calibrate with good tools. I know my squares are true.

View Grasshopper069's profile

Grasshopper069

21 posts in 81 days


#6 posted 04-02-2019 06:30 PM

Thanks Sawdust. I’ve seen other posts on this site about the Bosch where some said they had the same problem (also reviews on other sites site the same problem) while others said there Bosch was true. I’m aware of Festool in general (and have their track saw, it’s nice), just hard to justify that kind of price for accuracy. Seems like this isn’t an uncommon problem with the Bosch, was hoping to hear some other recs for other brands that are consistently accurate. Thanks!

View DannyW's profile

DannyW

136 posts in 160 days


#7 posted 04-02-2019 06:38 PM

Please take my advice with a very large grain of sale as I am relatively new to all of this. I rarely use my miter saw for angled cuts despite the saw’s name. The very first question from the instructor at the first woodworking class that I went to was “What kind of cuts do you perform on a miter saw?” and his answer was “90 degree crosscut only”. In his opinion miter saws are never accurate enough for miter cuts, which was a shock to me but it is the one piece of advice from that class that has stuck with me.

-- -DannyW

View Grasshopper069's profile

Grasshopper069

21 posts in 81 days


#8 posted 04-02-2019 06:52 PM

Thanks, Danny! Appreciate the advice, I’m not an experienced or professional woodworker, just a hobbyist and always trying to learn what I can. How do you make mitered cuts? Miter box? shooting board?

View DannyW's profile

DannyW

136 posts in 160 days


#9 posted 04-02-2019 06:58 PM

So far I have not had much need for mitered cuts as I am just getting into woodworking, but the instructor’s recommendation was a miter jig for the table saw. I would expect a shooting board to be the best but I have never used that approach. Before the class I had always used either a cheap miter box or a miter saw, but always had trouble making a tight fit. Now I know why. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

-- -DannyW

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2205 posts in 2160 days


#10 posted 04-02-2019 08:00 PM

I first bought my Bosch for trim work cutting tall crown molding. Some Mdf and some pine stuff that primered.
It’s a great trim saw.
But I also cut miters for furniture and miterd cabinet doors depending on how demanding the wood is to the saw determines the cut. If it’s real important to me I fine tune the fit with a Lie Nelson Miter plane and shoot board.
I also will just clamp the piece in my tail end vise if it’s not too long and handplane it.
Miters can be very challenging and it does take time to develop the skill.
I think it’s worth it.
The two blades I use are Amana and Forrest.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Grasshopper069's profile

Grasshopper069

21 posts in 81 days


#11 posted 04-02-2019 08:16 PM

Thanks, Aj. Appreciate your experience on this. I recently purchased a shooting plane (may be unnecessary) from Lee Valley and their shooting board fence and guide rail, and I still have to assemble into the board itself. So are you saying that you cut miters with the Bosch and then fine tune by hand? Maybe I’m oversimplifying this. Just seems my Bosch should be much more accurate than it is. Appreciate the recs on blades.

Bart

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2205 posts in 2160 days


#12 posted 04-02-2019 08:33 PM

Yep sometimes you’ll have to trim a little a little there that’s just how fussy miters can be. Some woods will actually change their shape each time you cut across the grain. Sometimes the board will cup enough to mess up the fit.
So one has to have a way of keeping track of what’s happening before and after the cuts.
This is where good measuring tools shine.
I don’t want to share too much half the fun is figuring this stuff out. :)
Endeavor to persevere.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

506 posts in 2094 days


#13 posted 04-02-2019 09:02 PM

I assume you are talking about a lack of consistency in the accuracy of the cuts (e.g. one time it might be dead-on and the next time the angle is off)? Does this happen when making multiple cuts across the same board (i.e. setup saw for 90 degree cut – make the cut – check for square – make a second cut using the same board w/o changing the saw angle—check for square——- and each cut made is a slightly different angle)?

I would double check to make sure that the compound angle adjustment is dead-on (maybe use a Wixey).
I would try to focus on using a consistent technique (e.g. don’t lift blade until it stops, use consistent pressure on handle, ensure stock is square and square to the fence (no dust or debris affecting the angle) and that it does not shift during the cut, etc.).

I can understand your frustration—that is an expensive saw and if the accuracy is inconsistent, it may only be good for rough cuts or cuts that do not require a high degree of accuracy.

I have an older model—Bosch 3915. Luckily for me it is fairly accurate and consistent for crosscuts, but I can pull it out alignment if I push hard on one side of the handle or the other while making a cut.

It’s probably not as consistently accurate for cuts made at the maximum crosscut width (~12”), but for smaller cuts (6” or less) I get dead-on 90deg cuts the vast majority of the time. The accuracy is definitely good enough for any framing work or trim work (e.g. crown molding, window and door casing, etc.).

I have an older full-kerf DeWalt saw blade on there (negative hook).

My guess is that if you want dead-on furniture quality cuts consistently—you want to use a table saw and a good miter gauge or an accurate crosscut sled.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5202 posts in 4323 days


#14 posted 04-02-2019 09:05 PM

Every slider/glider I have checked out has too much mvmnt. I’ll just stick with my std. miter for now.

-- [email protected]

View Grasshopper069's profile

Grasshopper069

21 posts in 81 days


#15 posted 04-02-2019 09:18 PM

Bill S., what I’ve noticed is that if I calibrate the saw to make a straight up and down 90 degree cut, then when I shift it to make a 45 degree cut it’s off. If I calibrate it at 0 (no bevel), just a dead simple cross cut, shouldn’t it also be calibrated at a 45? You mention many things that I didn’t realize could affect the cut, very helpful. At the moment i don’t have a table saw so not an option.

Bill W., thanks for the input, wasn’t sure if the slider/glider feature introduces too much play, maybe one saw to rule them all won’t work here. Maybe a 10” non-slider would be a good idea for smaller cuts, which is mostly what I do.

showing 1 through 15 of 33 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com