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Forum topic by Jerry posted 04-01-2019 08:11 PM 2121 views 0 times favorited 47 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry

3148 posts in 2006 days


04-01-2019 08:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hey everybody, I’m looking to do my first inlay. I want to do something like in this picture:

..but I need some help and guidance.

I have some little bit of an idea about how to go about doing this, but not really. I can’t figure out how to get the complex shapes at the spear point or whatever it is with regularity and accuracy.

CNC routing is not an option for me, this will be done either with a hand router plane with an inlay cutter or with a router with an inlay bit.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/


47 replies so far

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

3206 posts in 2615 days


#1 posted 04-01-2019 09:14 PM

Jerry, if you don’t have a pattern, I recommend “Shop Drawings for Craftsman Inlays & Hardware” by Bob Lang. Unfortunately, it doesn’t tell you how to actually make them, it just provides full scale drawings of Gustav Stickley and Harvey Ellis designs. I’m sorry I can’t be of more help. Maybe Shipwright will jump in. He is a master at marquetry and teaches classes. I think he lives in your “neighborhood”. Good luck.

-- Art

View MrLaughingbrook's profile

MrLaughingbrook

164 posts in 2325 days


#2 posted 04-01-2019 09:42 PM

Jerry, I’ve not done anything like that but do think about it from time to time. White circle inlay first with the router and inlay bit in a circle stencil. Regular veneer glue in the disk. Sand it smooth. Then the red one, same. Acrilic coat of Deft to block CA glue. For the curvy parts, Freehand through a paper sketch with a dremel or chisel. Remove paper template and clean up with chisel, sanding, fill the recessed areas with crushed stone or metal filings and CA thin then medium, sand it smooth. Good Luck!! Keep me posted.

-- MrLaughingbrook

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

3148 posts in 2006 days


#3 posted 04-01-2019 09:51 PM



Jerry, if you don t have a pattern, I recommend “Shop Drawings for Craftsman Inlays & Hardware” by Bob Lang. Unfortunately, it doesn t tell you how to actually make them, it just provides full scale drawings of Gustav Stickley and Harvey Ellis designs. I m sorry I can t be of more help. Maybe Shipwright will jump in. He is a master at marquetry and teaches classes. I think he lives in your “neighborhood”. Good luck.

- AandCstyle

Thanks Art, the pattern is not the problem, I spent 20 years as a graphic designer so I can duplicate these patterns with my eyes closed in Photoshop, but actually cutting them, that is the challenge. I don’t know if I have the physical control to do work that fine with a router…but maybe I do…

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

3148 posts in 2006 days


#4 posted 04-01-2019 09:53 PM



Jerry, I’ve not done anything like that but do think about it from time to time. White circle inlay first with the router and inlay bit in a circle stencil. Regular veneer glue in the disk. Sand it smooth. Then the red one, same. Acrilic coat of Deft to block CA glue. For the curvy parts, Freehand through a paper sketch with a dremel or chisel. Remove paper template and clean up with chisel, sanding, fill the recessed areas with crushed stone or metal filings and CA thin then medium, sand it smooth. Good Luck!! Keep me posted.

- MrLaughingbrook

Sounds like a good plan, it looks like this is gonna be a tough one…

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3323 posts in 1745 days


#5 posted 04-01-2019 10:30 PM

Did you see this piece in person of is this a picture you found? Do you know if it is an older piece or something made recently. The reason I am asking is that the grey and sort of mauve parts look like some sort of epoxy which would be a lot easier than trying to inlay a solid material. I am guessing it was done with a dremel in a router type base. There are several examples of DIY bases in the LJ projects. The 2 round discs could have been cut with a forstner bit and then the grey part done with the dremel and then filled with an epoxy with some sort of dye or filler.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

3148 posts in 2006 days


#6 posted 04-01-2019 10:42 PM



Did you see this piece in person of is this a picture you found? Do you know if it is an older piece or something made recently. The reason I am asking is that the grey and sort of mauve parts look like some sort of epoxy which would be a lot easier than trying to inlay a solid material. I am guessing it was done with a dremel in a router type base. There are several examples of DIY bases in the LJ projects. The 2 round discs could have been cut with a forstner bit and then the grey part done with the dremel and then filled with an epoxy with some sort of dye or filler.

- Lazyman

Thanks Nathan, this is a current offering of Steve Voorhees I’ve emailed him and am hoping for some guidance. The problem for me is not the inlay part, it’s the cutting part.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5913 posts in 3171 days


#7 posted 04-01-2019 11:27 PM

Most modern makers are doing this type of inlay with veneer and CNC. I’m not sure how the original Stickley group did that inlay, but the modern version isn’t really inlay per se, but marquetry. It’s a whole science of its own.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View tinnman65's profile

tinnman65

1371 posts in 3772 days


#8 posted 04-01-2019 11:36 PM

All the inlay I have done has been with a Dremel that was mounted to a small router base from Stewart Mac. I have seen the Veritas version of a small router base and it is excellent. I would suggest that you don’t even try this with the Dremel brand router base as in my opinion its the definition of junk. You can buy small 1/16” upcut or downcut bits for the Dremel I just can’t remember off hand where I bought mine from. I always cut my inlay parts out of veneer cut with a scroll saw or my chevolet, lay them on the field of wood with tape, and then trace out the parts with a scapple or Xacto knife. from there I cut out the waste. The reason I do it this way is if I have any inconsistencies between the pattern and the parts I cut out from the veneer the cavity will match my parts exactly. (or as close as my eyes can make it).Also, remember to stack cut your parts so they all look the same even if you get off the pattern a little while cutting. Just thought I would give you insight as to how I do it. I’m sure there are a number of ways to get it done. Good luck!

-- Paul--- Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep. — Scott Adams

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

3148 posts in 2006 days


#9 posted 04-02-2019 01:05 AM



Most modern makers are doing this type of inlay with veneer and CNC. I m not sure how the original Stickley group did that inlay, but the modern version isn t really inlay per se, but marquetry. It s a whole science of its own.

- pintodeluxe

I see….Thanks Willie!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

3148 posts in 2006 days


#10 posted 04-02-2019 01:06 AM



All the inlay I have done has been with a Dremel that was mounted to a small router base from Stewart Mac. I have seen the Veritas version of a small router base and it is excellent. I would suggest that you don t even try this with the Dremel brand router base as in my opinion its the definition of junk. You can buy small 1/16” upcut or downcut bits for the Dremel I just can t remember off hand where I bought mine from. I always cut my inlay parts out of veneer cut with a scroll saw or my chevolet, lay them on the field of wood with tape, and then trace out the parts with a scapple or Xacto knife. from there I cut out the waste. The reason I do it this way is if I have any inconsistencies between the pattern and the parts I cut out from the veneer the cavity will match my parts exactly. (or as close as my eyes can make it).Also, remember to stack cut your parts so they all look the same even if you get off the pattern a little while cutting. Just thought I would give you insight as to how I do it. I m sure there are a number of ways to get it done. Good luck!

- tinnman65

Very good information Paul, I appreciate the detailed explanation!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Druid's profile

Druid

2054 posts in 3153 days


#11 posted 04-02-2019 01:20 AM

Hi Jerry,
What you might want to look at is information on Marquetry, and as an excellent starting point, I would suggest contacting Paul at . . .
https://www.lumberjocks.com/shipwright
He teaches Marquetry, and you will find many excellent examples on his LJ page.

Looks like an interesting project ahead of you.

Best regards,
John.

-- John, British Columbia, Canada

View pontic's profile

pontic

690 posts in 966 days


#12 posted 04-02-2019 01:31 AM

They used veneer scribes and plows. They look like checking tools and marking knives. There is still an English company that sells them. I’ll look up the name for you. Be prepared to lighten your wallet.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8286 posts in 3156 days


#13 posted 04-02-2019 01:51 AM

Hi Jerry. Late to the party but I think other Paul (tinnman) about hit it. The recess cutting will be the art to learn.
Personally I would do the whole surface as a marquetry piece and match my background veneer as closely to the solid carcass as I could. That shouldn’t be hard as QSWO is easy to find in veneer.
I think the way they did it back in the day was by having amazing talent.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

3148 posts in 2006 days


#14 posted 04-02-2019 02:02 AM



Hi Jerry,
What you might want to look at is information on Marquetry, and as an excellent starting point, I would suggest contacting Paul at . . .
https://www.lumberjocks.com/shipwright
He teaches Marquetry, and you will find many excellent examples on his LJ page.

Looks like an interesting project ahead of you.

Best regards,
John.

- Druid

I’ve been following Paul for quite some time, he’s one of my lumberjocks buddiies and an amazing craftsman!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

3148 posts in 2006 days


#15 posted 04-02-2019 02:04 AM



They used veneer scribes and plows. They look like checking tools and marking knives. There is still an English company that sells them. I ll look up the name for you. Be prepared to lighten your wallet.

- pontic

I can’t even find veneer scribes and plows on the internet, so I’m relying on you to look that up, THANKS!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

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