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Forum topic by Nels posted 03-28-2019 11:17 AM 658 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Nels

48 posts in 2134 days


03-28-2019 11:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jig maple joining

I have a project that I’m gluing up 26” pieces of hard maple 1” thick. There are 17 pieces 9-10’ long. These are school bleacher seats. The ends need to be perfectly square.
Two questions:
1. any sugestion on how to make a cut off guide for a curcular saw. I also need to make some 45 degree cuts.

2. what blade is a good match for this project.


8 replies so far

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

322 posts in 1979 days


#1 posted 03-28-2019 12:01 PM

I would just clamp 2 or 3 together, making a very long board that is 52 or 78” wide, clamp a straight edge on the end being squared and run the saw along the straight edge. If you have access to a track saw, it will make things easier. I don’t, so I would treat this the same as if I was making a cross cut on a 4×8 sheet of plywood.

As for a blade, since you are cutting 1” thick hard maple, I would not go with a blade with too many teeth. They will get you a fine finish, but that much hard maple will be a bear to cut through. I would go with something more like a rip blade, even though you are not ripping.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View Robert's profile

Robert

3535 posts in 1986 days


#2 posted 03-28-2019 02:18 PM

I just use a speed square but you can make a jig Google it or go to YouTube.

Use a crosscut blade, like 40 tooth. There are charts on the package to help you. IMO Freud Diablo blades are the best.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View SMP's profile (online now)

SMP

1389 posts in 411 days


#3 posted 03-28-2019 05:18 PM

First, what saw and size are you using? And 45 degree which way?

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1426 days


#4 posted 03-29-2019 02:18 AM

Nels,

If you have a table saw, a panel squaring jig copied after one used in the early days of the “New Yankee Workshop” could work well. It is consists of a base of ½ plywood or MDF, a runner to ride in the table saw’s mitre slot, and a ¾” high fence attached to the leading edge of the base.

The runner is attached to the base so that the base slightly overhangs the saw blade. The table saw’s fence can be used to ensure the runner is attached to the base so that the base’s end is parallel to the saw blade. Then the jig’s fence is attached to the leading edge of the base using a framing square (that is true) making the jig’s fence perpendicular to the table saw’s fence and hence to the table saw’s blade. Once the construction is complete and the table saw fence moved out of the way, the panel squaring jig can be run through the table saw to trim the jig’s base and fence to length. If wide workpieces will be squared with the jig, extending the runner 6” – 8” past the trailing edge of the base will keep the jig running true throughout the cut.

The workpiece is positioned on the jig’s base with an edge tight against the jig’s fence and the cut is made. The end of the panel squaring jig’s fence can be used to precisely align the workpiece with the saw blade. The jig is zero clearance which helps minimize tear out.

A secondary fence set at a 45 degree angle to the jig’s fence could be installed on the base of the jig for 45 degree mitre cuts of wide workpieces. Alternatively, a second dedicated mitreing jig can be made.

A sharp combination blade would produce good results, although a high tooth count cross cut blaed should work better for square cuts. I would be inclined to a combination blade for the miter cuts.

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

352 posts in 2240 days


#5 posted 03-29-2019 12:44 PM



Nels,

If you have a table saw, a panel squaring jig copied after one used in the early days of the “New Yankee Workshop” could work well. It is consists of a base of ½ plywood or MDF, a runner to ride in the table saw’s mitre slot, and a ¾” high fence attached to the leading edge of the base.

The runner is attached to the base so that the base slightly overhangs the saw blade. The table saw’s fence can be used to ensure the runner is attached to the base so that the base’s end is parallel to the saw blade. Then the jig’s fence is attached to the leading edge of the base using a framing square (that is true) making the jig’s fence perpendicular to the table saw’s fence and hence to the table saw’s blade. Once the construction is complete and the table saw fence moved out of the way, the panel squaring jig can be run through the table saw to trim the jig’s base and fence to length. If wide workpieces will be squared with the jig, extending the runner 6” – 8” past the trailing edge of the base will keep the jig running true throughout the cut.

The workpiece is positioned on the jig’s base with an edge tight against the jig’s fence and the cut is made. The end of the panel squaring jig’s fence can be used to precisely align the workpiece with the saw blade. The jig is zero clearance which helps minimize tear out.

A secondary fence set at a 45 degree angle to the jig’s fence could be installed on the base of the jig for 45 degree mitre cuts of wide workpieces. Alternatively, a second dedicated mitreing jig can be made.

A sharp combination blade would produce good results, although a high tooth count cross cut blaed should work better for square cuts. I would be inclined to a combination blade for the miter cuts.

- JBrow

The OP says they are 9 to 10 feet long. Cutting anything that long on a table saw is darn near impossible. Even with a sled.

The OP also says they are 26” wide bleacher seats. That seems rather unusual. I’ve sat on many bleachers in the past. None of them were over a foot wide. Was that a typo?

If it was a typo, a miter saw would be your best bet. You can dial it in to get 90 degree and 45 degree (either front to back or top to bottom) cuts fast and easy.

If a miter saw is out of the question, then Grant’s suggestion would be the way to go.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View theart's profile

theart

130 posts in 1060 days


#6 posted 03-29-2019 04:15 PM

I would use a big T-square. Cut the board a bit long with the circular saw and clean it up with a router.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6439 posts in 1218 days


#7 posted 03-29-2019 06:49 PM

if you cant use a miter saw try a cabinet shop with panel saw they should be able to cut them in no time :<)))))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

499 posts in 285 days


#8 posted 03-29-2019 07:04 PM

I have a long aluminum square straight edge. I mark a square line on the stock, move in the distance from the inside of my blade to the edge of my guide and clamp the straight edge at that line then cut.

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