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FYI - Tool Manufacturers and Who Really Owns Them

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Forum topic by Andybb posted 03-27-2019 11:19 PM 821 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Andybb

1884 posts in 963 days


03-27-2019 11:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource

Wasn’t sure if this should go here or in the Coffee Lounge. Never knew that SawStop and Festool were owned by the same people. Not that it matters.

Power Tool Manufacturers and Who Really Owns Them

One of my reasons for posting this is that people always put the “Chineseium” label on stuff. Just because it’s made in China doesn’t mean its a Harbor Freight tool. A tool manufactured and assembled in China that is made to specs set out by some company is not a necessarily a bad tool. After all, they did just land a rover on the moon so they do know how to machine stuff.

-- Andy - Seattle USA


12 replies so far

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ralbuck

5957 posts in 2626 days


#1 posted 03-28-2019 12:00 AM

The manufactures have played this game for decades. Many different brands of oil come out of the same refinery and just have label differences, World wide auto manufactures use a lot of the same parts . batteries for auto etc, have many brands and less than a dozen manufactures!

Tires are another example of this too.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

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diverlloyd

3468 posts in 2217 days


#2 posted 03-28-2019 12:26 AM

Food also, if the container looks the same then more then likely they are the same. Run out of one brand label slap the next brand label on.

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Woodknack

12772 posts in 2739 days


#3 posted 03-28-2019 12:45 AM

One you don’t hear about often is carbonless paper forms, IIRC there is only one or two companies printing them and everyone else is a distributor or retailer. In the printing trade it’s not unlikely that you will buy through several layers of middlemen, each believing their supplier is the actual printer because companies outright lie. (There are small companies that print small orders) And it’s been that way for decades, not a recent thing at all. Matter of fact more printing every year is outsourced to mega-printers, or trade printers, and small shops increasingly become order takers.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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SMP

839 posts in 265 days


#4 posted 03-28-2019 03:53 AM


Food also, if the container looks the same then more then likely they are the same. Run out of one brand label slap the next brand label on.

- diverlloyd

I always like the food chart where all brands are owned by 10 companies
https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/57ebc2d7077dcc0f208b7830-750-500.png

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Woodknack

12772 posts in 2739 days


#5 posted 03-28-2019 05:18 AM

Teddy Roosevelt is rolling in his grave.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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PCDub

137 posts in 603 days


#6 posted 03-30-2019 03:06 PM

For anyone who would rather read than watch, here's the article about who owns which tool companies.

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ibewjon

365 posts in 3153 days


#7 posted 03-30-2019 08:10 PM

I heard saw stop only recently sold out. Anyone know? As for other products , I have seen many brands of foam plates come off the same machine, however different thicknesses of foam stock are used.

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fuigb

558 posts in 3317 days


#8 posted 03-30-2019 10:02 PM



The manufactures have played this game for decades. Many different brands of oil come out of the same refinery and just have label differences, World wide auto manufactures use a lot of the same parts . batteries for auto etc, have many brands and less than a dozen manufactures!

Tires are another example of this too.

- ralbuck

Common suppliers and look-alike components do not equate to common quality in the global auto supply chain. Materials and machining mean everything, and typically there’s a good reason for the lower price on many of the options. Good entertainment is seeing a driver or dealer worked up when a replacement part fails miserably: “yeah, that’s not OEM spec, so you gambled to save a few bucks…” Another factor is the near-piracy committed by Chinese copycat manufacturers: they’ll buy an OEM part and create one that looks identical. Sometimes they’re good, sometimes ok, and a lot of times they’re junk like a copy of a copy of a copy. Given what I know of China from my day job I do what I’m able to minimize the “China” in my hobby.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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CaptainKlutz

1223 posts in 1854 days


#9 posted 03-31-2019 12:19 AM

Who owns which marketing brand label is not near as interesting as who actually makes the equipment – IMHO

Things get real interesting when some one like Chang Industries in Taiwan buys the Delta product line from Stanely/Black&Decker, while making still making equipment for them?
Read: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Machinery
then: http://www.toty.com.tw/english/02_our_business/02_our_clients_oem_odm_brands.html

Check out these folks are see if you recognize any tools from the wood working magazines?

http://www.harveymachinery.com/
(Harvey owns Bridge City Tools)

https://glorywoodmachine.en.made-in-china.com/product-group/BeHxISGPhrRZ/Band-saws-catalog-1.html
(Rikon anyone?)

https://henrytian.en.made-in-china.com/

https://burtgroup.en.made-in-china.com/

https://guilishun.en.made-in-china.com/

https://jhstrength.en.made-in-china.com/product-list-1.html

https://www.facebook.com/Qingdao-Glory-Industrial-Machinery-And-Equipment-CoLtd-335424460622872/

If you are really bored, search and surf to actual china language home pages, and look at images.
Might have to look real close at images, especially factory floor pictures. They also seem to have a couple of OEM tools sitting in background, hoping new customers see them, and arguing with OEM’s that noone can read the brand name in image. LOL

It’s entertaining to learn tool sourcing as long as you are not stuck doing it. :-(

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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ibewjon

365 posts in 3153 days


#10 posted 03-31-2019 01:09 PM

Chinese piracy / copying can also be dangerous. There are copycat electrical breakers on the market, looking like original products, but only being switches. They contain NO OVERLOAD or SHORT CIRCUIT PROTECTION!!! Beware of an unusually low price.

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Andybb

1884 posts in 963 days


#11 posted 04-07-2019 02:51 AM


Who owns which marketing brand label is not near as interesting as who actually makes the equipment – IMHO

- CaptainKlutz

That was my original point. Just because it’s made in China or Taiwan doesn’t automatically mean it’s junk. Doesn’t mean it’s not either. Even for the HF stuff. Interesting video from AvE who makes a habit of disassembling stuff. Got 2 of those angle grinders from HF for $9.99 on sale. I’m sure they will last me at least 10 years. I keep a grinding wheel on my big Makita and cut off and wire wheels on the HF ones.

Anybody remember the 60’s when “Made in Japan” was considered subpar?

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Woodknack

12772 posts in 2739 days


#12 posted 04-07-2019 05:19 AM



Who owns which marketing brand label is not near as interesting as who actually makes the equipment – IMHO

Things get real interesting when some one like Chang Industries in Taiwan buys the Delta product line from Stanely/Black&Decker, while making still making equipment for them?
Read: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Machinery
then: http://www.toty.com.tw/english/02_our_business/02_our_clients_oem_odm_brands.html
- CaptainKlutz

First link doesn’t say anything about Chang Type customers, second link says Sears is #2 retailer and copyright on that page is 2002 so I would take it with a grain of salt. That said it was told to me by a Powermatic employee that when CT bought Delta they were manufacturing PM machinery, not sure if that is still true. And I know they were making machines for other companies but I don’t know which ones.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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