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Forum topic by Raymer posted 03-27-2019 03:37 PM 1195 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Raymer

92 posts in 442 days


03-27-2019 03:37 PM

I was in my garage yesterday and running some wood through the jointer. I was following all the rules of safety, until I broke one of them.

This is why they say to keep both feet planted and move your upper body and not walk the piece through.

Just as I was at the last bit, I felt myself stretching on a 5’ long board, I took a step and my foot came down on my dog. When she yelped, I yanked my foot back and somewhat stumbled, right hand slid off the workpiece and came down on the pancake guard right over the cutterhead.

No harm, but scared me for a moment. My dog has always hung outside with me and has never gotten under me before like that. She always lays at the very edge of the garage and watches people walk by and cars going down the street. Only reason I let her out with me is she will never leave the garage without me and has never gotten in the way before.

Anyway sorry for the long post for what amounted to nothing, but could have turned out differently and will have to pay more attention to her or reassess her being out there with me.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.


21 replies so far

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1413 posts in 1996 days


#1 posted 03-27-2019 03:56 PM

Wow! That could have been sooo bad!
Glad that guard was doing its job.
I hope the pooch’s foot is ok.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

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Holbs

2196 posts in 2389 days


#2 posted 03-27-2019 04:19 PM

I follow very specific rules that are easy to work with.
1.) All machines are unplugged until time of use.
2.) before plugging machine in, verify nothing is in the vicinity of blades or knives.
3.) two things before hitting power on. standing area is clear of obstructions (example: that errant 2×4 or dust collection hose) and once again, nothing near the blades/knives.
4.) and finally, no obstruction with the outfeed area.

Has kept me out of trouble so far. I follow these steps religiously and only takes 1.7 seconds to accomplish.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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Raymer

92 posts in 442 days


#3 posted 03-27-2019 04:31 PM



I follow very specific rules that are easy to work with.
1.) All machines are unplugged until time of use.
2.) before plugging machine in, verify nothing is in the vicinity of blades or knives.
3.) two things before hitting power on. standing area is clear of obstructions (example: that errant 2×4 or dust collection hose) and once again, nothing near the blades/knives.
4.) and finally, no obstruction with the outfeed area.

Has kept me out of trouble so far. I follow these steps religiously and only takes 1.7 seconds to accomplish.

- Holbs

Very good rules to follow and I had checked below me before i started, she came up under me after I had already started into the cut. That is why I may have to stop letting her out with me when using the machines.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

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Holbs

2196 posts in 2389 days


#4 posted 03-27-2019 04:36 PM

I have cats. When it’s quiet in the shop, they come snooping around wondering why it smells so….Earthly. But the first machine, especially dust collector, turns on…they bolt out of the shop.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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pottz

5007 posts in 1344 days


#5 posted 03-27-2019 04:36 PM

yeah it only takes a split second for an accident to happen,luckily that guard did what it was intended for.as far as my dog in the shop i rarely allow her in their unless im not using any machines,it’s just to much distraction having a pet running around when i need to be concentrating on what im doing.stay safe and keep your dog safe.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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OleGrump

246 posts in 704 days


#6 posted 04-21-2019 05:41 PM

This is why in Pop-Pop’s cabinet shop, ANY kid had to be in his full view and stand well away ANY time he operated a machine. He knew where you were, and that you or he would not get hurt. Next, NO, ZERO, NEIN, NIX, NICHT, NO animals were allowed in the shop. Pop knew it was far too easy to trip over one and get seriously injured or even killed. No, our family is not a bunch of animal haters. We have had numerous pets over the years. We just like them and the ability to count to ten too much to allow them to wander into the woodshop.

-- OleGrump

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 73 days


#7 posted 04-21-2019 06:14 PM

I get all over guys who take safeties off nail guns saws and other tools. I know people who have been cut badly i had a nail go through two boards and my ring finger i worked with a guy who backed into a nail gun with no safety. It nailed his leg and he got gangreen nearly lost his leg. U never see it coming and u aint fast enoughto dodge bullets. Keep guards in place and working properly. If u cant use the guard on your tablesaw cut the plastic guard put a lexan spacer in it make it part of the dust collection system but dont throw it under the shelf in the corner. Use guards and be safe guys

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

577 posts in 271 days


#8 posted 04-21-2019 07:36 PM

Good lesson to NOT remove the gaurds from the machines.. Just think of that happening on the table saw without a gaurd. Glad your dog and you are alright.

View Oldude's profile

Oldude

2 posts in 81 days


#9 posted 04-22-2019 04:22 AM

Last August I was trimming a table leg at the ts where I broke a rule, I left a power cord laying on the floor, and like you I picked up my foot to move a little and came down on the cord. A long story short, it caused me to lose my balance and control of push stick and my left hand went right into the blade, major injuries and ended up with over 200 stitches, severed tendon in pointer finger, AND lost tips of pointer and little finger. Keep your area clear and as a few others have said DON’T remove your safety guards, they are important!!!

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

495 posts in 2930 days


#10 posted 04-22-2019 01:52 PM



I was in my garage yesterday and running some wood through the jointer. I was following all the rules of safety, until I broke one of them.

This is why they say to keep both feet planted and move your upper body and not walk the piece through.

Just as I was at the last bit, I felt myself stretching on a 5 long board, I took a step and my foot came down on my dog. When she yelped, I yanked my foot back and somewhat stumbled, right hand slid off the workpiece and came down on the pancake guard right over the cutterhead.

No harm, but scared me for a moment. My dog has always hung outside with me and has never gotten under me before like that. She always lays at the very edge of the garage and watches people walk by and cars going down the street. Only reason I let her out with me is she will never leave the garage without me and has never gotten in the way before.

Anyway sorry for the long post for what amounted to nothing, but could have turned out differently and will have to pay more attention to her or reassess her being out there with me.

- Raymer

Things like this are exactly why I’m baffled by the anti-Sawstop guys who say things like, “I work safely, I don’t need a nanny”, etc. Anything can happen at any time. Hopefully you sharing your experience can save someone else an injury, thanks for sharing.

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 73 days


#11 posted 04-22-2019 03:56 PM

Sawstop is a great system but a lot of injuries are going to happen on jobsight saws and nailguns with guards and springloaded safeties. I had to fire a carpenter for repeatedly removing the spring from my nailgun to make it a dangerous tool. Ive seen a young man cut his femur in two ripping a piece turned on its side. The saw bound and kicked back. The guard was disabled with a small wood wedge. Too popular of a trick guys play to keep from using two hands at tbe start of a cut or adjusting blade height. An attitude of invincibility often leads to stitches amputation impalement or broken bones. Remind it has happened and u are not bulletproof

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2197 posts in 2158 days


#12 posted 04-22-2019 04:44 PM

After reading everyone’s advise on safety. I can admit I’m not very safe at all.
Compared to when I was roofing full time I can say I’m very safe.
I know it doesn’t make sense.
But this what happens when we compare our insides to someone else’s outside.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Carlos510's profile

Carlos510

259 posts in 732 days


#13 posted 04-22-2019 05:43 PM

Yes I agree with everyone here guards are your best friend with all powered tools in the shop. But they are not always possible. You can’t use a splitter mounted guard when your cutting dados with a stack blade, so use a router, not everyone has one and like to use the table saw for everything it is capable of. Not everyone can afford a Sawstop or Excalibur type guard either. When working on the table saw without a guard, there is always a rectangular image of a box around that blade into which my hands never enter, just the same as you never pass your hand over the cutter head of a jointer. Most will say thats easier said than done, and they would be right. But the biggest threat to this and most other situations a person finds himself in the shop is distraction, pets, kids, and even the neighbor who just wants to watch or chat are the biggest threats to your safety when the power is turned on. A ringing phone especially the modern cellphone are all distractions that pull your attention from where it is needed. Heres a link to what could have been a disaster for one woodworker caused by a simple distraction. Scroll down to the bottom of the page.

https://hobbyworkshopprojects.blogspot.com/2018/10/3-phase-is-it-worth-converting.html

-- "If time is money, then I need a loan" , http://www.hobbyworkshopprojects.blogspot.com/

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

9039 posts in 2688 days


#14 posted 04-22-2019 05:52 PM

Glad you weren’t hurt.

Time to reassess the dogs access to the garage shop while your working.

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 73 days


#15 posted 04-22-2019 06:36 PM

Turn off your ringer or leave the phone in your truck. Use the guard u have. If u cant use the splitter at least make the clear plastic part of your guard into a dust collection port that sits over the blade or dado head. Its simple and at least its there to remind u that spinning bunch of razor sharp steel or carbide dont take prisoners. I painted red circles on both sides of my miter saw blade. I tell people those are stop signs. No fingers beyond the red circles period. The tool is really only as dangerous as the operator.

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

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