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Separate Shed for Lumber Storage

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Forum topic by lblankenship posted 03-26-2019 05:56 PM 950 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lblankenship

51 posts in 950 days


03-26-2019 05:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lumber storage workshop

Hi all,

Just planning my future shop, it’s not happening anytime soon but why not start planning now? Ha.

I wanted to see what thoughts were on storing lumber in a separate shed/building than your workshop. My original thought was it would be great for saving workspace but I wasn’t sure how the lumber would acclimate. If I brought the lumber home and stored it in one shed would I need to let it acclimate again in the actual shop prior to using it?

Let’s assume the shed would be fully enclosed but not heated or cooled where as the actual shop would be heated and cooled.

Thanks in advance!


13 replies so far

View Boochiee's profile

Boochiee

30 posts in 407 days


#1 posted 03-26-2019 06:42 PM

I am a complete novice but I think that sounds awesome! My major concern would be humidity. From as far as I can recall I am pretty sure you wouldn’t want any wood warping from the moisture in the air. I don’t think it really needs a certain temp but if the humidity is very high then it might mess with the wood.

I’m just looking for a whole new house that has a large barn or additional garage that I can put all my woodworking supplies and tools inside.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1130 posts in 3494 days


#2 posted 03-26-2019 07:33 PM

It’s what I do (lumber in garage, shop in basement). It’s slightly inconvenient to have to plan a bit ahead and cart the wood for a project into the shop a bit in advance (a few days to a week depending on the time of year), but not really a big deal.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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avsmusic1

592 posts in 1361 days


#3 posted 03-26-2019 09:11 PM

Do you ever buy green lumber?

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lblankenship

51 posts in 950 days


#4 posted 03-26-2019 10:39 PM


Do you ever buy green lumber?

- avsmusic1

Not currently but I don’t want to say that Wilma always be the case.

Basically I’m wondering if i still need to let the lumber acclimate to the actual shop before doing so or if the change would be minimal moving from a shed to the shop. If it would need to acclimate a second time then I would probably just try to allocate space in the actual shop. That way it can start acclimating immediately and it will be ready to start milling whenever I need it.

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Holbs

2282 posts in 2705 days


#5 posted 03-26-2019 11:08 PM

I did the same last summer, built a shed (it’s in my project section) just for storing lumber and outdoor tools.
I never thought of acclimation as the purpose of the shed was to store stuff, period :)
But since it’s outside in the open air with the humidity and temp changes as compared to inside a more environment friendly secured, I would have to say yes… you would have to somewhat worry about acclimation. However, I would be more concerned in general, about drying the wood when bringing it home than acclimation.
In a perfect world, could bring home lumber and store in 65 degree low humidity room for a year before ready to use.
I have outdoor shed. I do not worry at all about acclimation. Maybe I should :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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therealSteveN

5159 posts in 1250 days


#6 posted 03-26-2019 11:23 PM

Acclimate can mean a lot of different things. Most guys do not have a “conditioned” shop to the extent we do in our homes. So unless you are just making shop furniture it will almost always change some coming out of that building you call a shop, and wherever it ends up, inside or out.

If it’s in one non conditioned building, and you bring it to another that may be the least you will see changes. Generally it’s moving it from the shop, to a home, IE conditioned space.

I just factored it in on my shop, and overbuilt so I could also house wood storage inside. Mostly because it saves steps going to the wood shed, and then bringing it all into the shop. I only need to carry once now, and that keeps me happy.

-- Think safe, be safe

View avsmusic1's profile

avsmusic1

592 posts in 1361 days


#7 posted 03-27-2019 02:14 AM


Do you ever buy green lumber?

- avsmusic1

Not currently but I don t want to say that Wilma always be the case.

Basically I m wondering if i still need to let the lumber acclimate to the actual shop before doing so or if the change would be minimal moving from a shed to the shop. If it would need to acclimate a second time then I would probably just try to allocate space in the actual shop. That way it can start acclimating immediately and it will be ready to start milling whenever I need it.

- lblankenship


As others noted, th short answer is yes. The only reason I could see to build a separate shed if u didn’t have to, is if it was partially open to air dry green lumber

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

959 posts in 587 days


#8 posted 03-27-2019 06:09 AM

You should still acclimate the wood to your shop temperature. I just got 50 board of hickory, and put it in the shop. I’m waiting about a week before I start making a Hope Chest with it. I’ll make a couple Urns with the remainder. I do suggest that you buy your wood as you need it, or you could have a bunch of money sitting there in wood. Cost adds up in a hurry.

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bobjm

2 posts in 222 days


#9 posted 08-23-2019 03:30 PM

I am getting ready to start building some cherry furniture. My shop is in a hot and humid garage. The furniture will be in my house. Should I acclimate the lumber in my house and only take to the shop when I am working on it? Not sure what will happen if it acclimates to shop conditions and then comes inside.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1554 posts in 3525 days


#10 posted 08-23-2019 06:19 PM


I am getting ready to start building some cherry furniture. My shop is in a hot and humid garage. The furniture will be in my house. Should I acclimate the lumber in my house and only take to the shop when I am working on it? Not sure what will happen if it acclimates to shop conditions and then comes inside.

- bobjm

I’m in the same situation Bob, and mostly work with cherry I buy from a sawyer that stores everything in open air sheds here in southern MD. I’ve got many pieces in the house that were built in the shop and I have not had any movement issues. I don’t have a moisture meter, (have not seen enough of a “deal” yet), but I do design and build keeping the potential of movement in mind and minimize cross grain situations. I buy my stock, store it in the shop/garage, build the piece, finish it and move it inside.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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farmfromkansas

125 posts in 290 days


#11 posted 08-24-2019 01:47 AM

Air dried lumber is as low as about 12%. Your house usually runs between 6 and 8%. So ideally you should have a dehumidifier in your lumber storage room to get your lumber down to at least 8% moisture content. I have a dehumidifier in my storage room, and this year being extremely wet and humid, have to dump the dehumidifier every day. Maybe you could get a dehumidifier with a hose so you could run it into a drain.

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bobjm

2 posts in 222 days


#12 posted 08-24-2019 06:04 AM

ChefHDAN – would your sawyer be on rt 50 just before the Bay bridge? That’s where I used to get my wood when I lived in MD.

farmfromkansas – dehumidifier would not work – have to keep garage door open (w/screen) otherwise it would be too hot to work.

thx guys for the input

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2801 posts in 3598 days


#13 posted 08-24-2019 10:41 AM

I have stored cedar and oak outside and brought it into my shop and when I re-sawed it, it cupped badly. I then started bringing it into my shop a day or two before using it. I do have a seperate shed beside my shop that houses my dust collector. This keeps the noise and some dust out of my work area.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

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