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Finish resistant to tea.

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Forum topic by AESamuel posted 03-24-2019 03:46 PM 269 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AESamuel

93 posts in 1550 days


03-24-2019 03:46 PM

Hi there!

I’m making a small rest for used tea bags out of walnut and am now considering what finish to apply. The finish will need to be resistant to small amounts of warm water sitting on the surface, and of course the tannins from the tea. It will also be washed briefly in warm soapy water every now and again.

My first thought was simple poly or marine poly but it’s not my favourite finish to apply. Would a spray lacquer be durable enough? Is it worth putting BLO or Danish oil underneath incase there is damage to the outer finish?

Many thanks,
Asa


11 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12726 posts in 2707 days


#1 posted 03-24-2019 05:02 PM

I would be tempted to test as I’m not sure what the acids in tea will do to a finish. You could always use epoxy.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View CaptainKlutz's profile (online now)

CaptainKlutz

1088 posts in 1822 days


#2 posted 03-24-2019 05:59 PM

Tannic acid will eat thru any porous top coat, so grain needs to be filled to reduce permeation. It is also used as a yellow/brown dye component, so expect some yellowing on any polymer.

Note that all single part polyurethanes are moisture permeable (even Marine poly), and won’t tolerate extended water contact. When they absorb water, they will blush or turn white. The 2 part poly are formulated to have significantly less permeability, and perform much better than even epoxy.

IMHO – Best finish would be industrial grade 2K poly commonly used on commercial wood bar tops. Total PIA for use on small items. 2 part poly is not a offered as a consumer grade finish. Will need to obtain 2K poly from commercial supplier due Health/Safety issues.
Look for local Ilva coatings, AkzoNobel, Gemini, Sherwin Williams, PPG, or Mowhawk wood coatings distributor. AkzoNobel also sells clear Interthane 2 part poly top coat thru some marine supply stores.
MUST use all proper personal protective equipment.
Be safe!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5323 posts in 2679 days


#3 posted 03-24-2019 06:25 PM

I’d just use Danish oil and plan on re-oiling it from time to time.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1856 posts in 931 days


#4 posted 03-24-2019 07:49 PM

I’m also thinking epoxy if you want it to be impervious to everything Mrs. Nature has to throw at it.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View SMP's profile

SMP

595 posts in 233 days


#5 posted 03-24-2019 07:52 PM

To be honest i would consider doing like a small inset of granite/marble. Tea will cause all sorts of weirdness and discoloration etc.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2063 posts in 3626 days


#6 posted 03-25-2019 12:26 AM

Epoxy, 100%. You need something that creates a totally impermeable layer.

I forget the brand, but there’s an epoxy bar top finish that would be a good fit here.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1742 posts in 1542 days


#7 posted 03-25-2019 12:38 AM

+1 for those who say epoxy

-- Desert_Woodworker

View SMP's profile

SMP

595 posts in 233 days


#8 posted 03-25-2019 03:32 AM



Epoxy, 100%. You need something that creates a totally impermeable layer.

I forget the brand, but there s an epoxy bar top finish that would be a good fit here.

- jonah

Well there are quite a few brands. I’ve used Parks, Famowood, and another brand I forget the name of used a long time ago called Spar40 i think. Have also used some from boat store (system 3?)The famowood is probably the easiest to find.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2125 posts in 2125 days


#9 posted 03-25-2019 03:45 AM

Why even bother making it out of wood if your just going to cover it with epoxy. :(
Might as well be brown plastic

-- Aj

View AESamuel's profile

AESamuel

93 posts in 1550 days


#10 posted 03-25-2019 03:33 PM

Thanks for the suggestions everyone, I’ll try out some of them on some test wood!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117592 posts in 3905 days


#11 posted 03-25-2019 04:04 PM

I agree with Bono


I d just use Danish oil and plan on re-oiling it from time to time.

- bondogaposis

https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

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