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danish oil for ice cream scoop?

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Forum topic by kooldecker posted 03-24-2019 02:06 PM 284 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kooldecker

79 posts in 2113 days


03-24-2019 02:06 PM

hey guys i had a quick question. i have a vintage ice cream scopp i want to finish to make it more water resistant. what do you think about soaking it in some danish oil? i dont want a film finish i want to feel the wood. but im a little stymied about how to go about it. it gets handwashed only but still sees a little water when it does get washed. thanks as always for your support and knowledge!

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"


10 replies so far

View PaulRutgers's profile

PaulRutgers

7 posts in 243 days


#1 posted 03-24-2019 02:13 PM

Is it just the handle or the whole scoop that’s wood? I would use mineral oil during to it being food safe and odorless.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1133 days


#2 posted 03-24-2019 03:51 PM


I would use mineral oil during to it being food safe and odorless.

- PaulRutgers

All modern finishes are food safe once they cure.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2448 posts in 2534 days


#3 posted 03-24-2019 04:10 PM

You can apply solvent poly same as danish oil for a tougher finish – more resin vs danish oil. Regular interior or exterior poly, thin it 1:1. Same as da – flood surface keep wet for 5-10 min, wipe off, let solvents flash, repeat.

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PaulRutgers

7 posts in 243 days


#4 posted 03-24-2019 04:33 PM

This is not completely correct. There are different degrees of food safe. The main difference is whether used in direct or indirect food contact, and the difference between the two is not completely agreed upon. There is no shortage of debate about it, nor is there a shortage of research available.

So far as the FDA is concerned, mineral oil or paraffin wax are food safe along with oils derived from vegetables and some nuts in pure form, without driers added. Amongst these, there are advantages and disadvantages to each depending on their intended application.

Vegetable based oils, most commonly olive oil and coconut oil. There are others, but these are the ones most commonly used. These contain no harmful addatives, but can impart taste to food, and over time will become rancid if the item is not used frequently.

Nut oils can produce a very nice finish, but in their unadulterated state they take very long to dry, and do not soak into the wood very well and will begin to flake off during use and washing causing them to look shabby and leave areas of the wood unprotected. This also happens with vegetable oils to a lesser degree.

Paraffin is a pain to work with as it requires a double boiler large enough to submerge the item being treated in to be effective, requires a much larger amount of wax than is needed and the excess needs to be scraped off and then finally buffed to have a good appearance.

Mineral oil is, in my opinion, ideal. Tasteless, inexpensive, completely food safe, and easy to apply. Melt it together with beeswax and rub it into warm wood and it will protect well, be easier to wash, and look good. Plus, since it is not a drying oil, a rag soaked in it can be simply put into a baggie, empty container from sour cream, cottage cheese, etc and saved for next time without fear of combusting.

I tell my customers that if you wouldnt put it in your mouth, dont put it on things that are going to touch your food. Even if it is “safe when cured” with so many other options, why even bother?

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1133 days


#5 posted 03-24-2019 06:39 PM


So far as the FDA is concerned…

- PaulRutgers

Sorry, but food safe is food safe, and any finish is safe once it’s cured. I don’t buy your FDA comment without a reference cited. Anybody can say “as far as the {name your favorite agency} is concerned,” and it’s worthless if you don’t include a link.

I keep this piece from Bob Flexner handy because this nonsense comes up all the time on here:

——————————————————————

In fact, all finishes are safe to eat off of or be chewed on once the finish has fully cured. The rule of thumb for curing is 30 days, but warm conditions make curing happen faster. With all solvent-based finishes, you can determine that a finish has cured sufficiently by pressing your nose against the dry finish and sniffing. If there is any odor, the finish isn’t yet cured. Only if you can’t smell anything is the object safe for food or mouth contact.

Flexner, Bob. Understanding Wood Finishing: How to Select and Apply the Right Finish (American Woodworker) (p. 76). Fox Chapel Publishing. Kindle Edition.

■ No Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), required by the government to list all hazardous or toxic effects of a product, warns against contact with food or children’s mouths for any oil or varnish finish, or for any other finish.

■ The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lists all common driers as safe for food contact as long as the finish is made properly— that is, as long as the finish cures. (The FDA doesn’t “approve” of finishes as some manufacturers claim. The FDA approves of ingredients and sets rules for testing that a finish cures properly.)

■ You have never heard of anyone (adult or child) being poisoned by contact with a cured clear finish. If someone had been poisoned, you can bet it would have made the news!

Let’s finally put this myth to bed and use other, more legitimate, criteria for choosing a finish.

Flexner, Bob. Understanding Wood Finishing: How to Select and Apply the Right Finish (American Woodworker) (p. 76). Fox Chapel Publishing. Kindle Edition.

——————————————————————


Even if it is “safe when cured” with so many other options, why even bother?

Because for some situations, a film finish is the best choice. Sometimes it’s not. Part of providing a quality product is knowing which to choose at a given time.

View kooldecker's profile

kooldecker

79 posts in 2113 days


#6 posted 03-24-2019 07:46 PM

hey guys its just the handle. so contact with food is not a concern to me. if you dont mind me asking does anyone have anymore info on this solvent poly? ive never heard of it. if its harder than danish oil it sounds great

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1133 days


#7 posted 03-24-2019 07:48 PM


hey guys its just the handle. so contact with food is not a concern to me. if you dont mind me asking does anyone have anymore info on this solvent poly? ive never heard of it. if its harder than danish oil it sounds great

- kooldecker

It’s usually called oil-based. The opposite of waterborne.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1428 posts in 450 days


#8 posted 03-24-2019 07:49 PM

I’d probably use Arm R Seal. Get the looks of oil with the benefits of poly., 3 light coats and you still see wood grain.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2174 posts in 1148 days


#9 posted 03-24-2019 08:13 PM

That scoop is gonna live in the sink or dishwasher. I’d be looking to some kind of penetrating epoxy like Total Boat or West System.

Let it penetrate and cure. Then sand to expose the wood and then apply whatever finish you want.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2448 posts in 2534 days


#10 posted 03-25-2019 12:12 PM


hey guys its just the handle. so contact with food is not a concern to me. if you dont mind me asking does anyone have anymore info on this solvent poly? ive never heard of it. if its harder than danish oil it sounds great

- kooldecker


Just plain ole solvent or oil based poly varnish (not waterbase), like Minwax, Arm-R-Seal, or other brands. Just a few years ago I would see lots of brands at Lowes, Walmart, hardware stores, but these days it seems to be minwax everywhere. Lots of folks dis minwax poly, but I get excellent results with. Used ARS as well and get the same results, but minwax is cheaper and more readily available for me. Be sure to use regular mineral spirits – if it says “green”, environmentally safer, etc dont use it. Low odor is ok.

If interested dye can be added to poly for some color, read here.

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