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Forum topic by AudibleVelvet posted 03-22-2019 08:25 PM 940 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AudibleVelvet

22 posts in 1013 days


03-22-2019 08:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

It’s rather light and edge tools go through with ease. It may be a bit more yellowish than the pictures show, but they’re fairly accurate.


20 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8914 posts in 1464 days


#1 posted 03-22-2019 08:34 PM

Looks like Luan to me.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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AudibleVelvet

22 posts in 1013 days


#2 posted 03-22-2019 09:10 PM



Looks like Luan to me.

- HokieKen


Never heard of it. Thanks!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3221 posts in 1713 days


#3 posted 03-22-2019 09:17 PM

+1 on Lauan. It is usually use for thin plywood underlayment for floors or backing for paneling. Not very pretty and often used as the back panel on cheap furniture, usually with some sort of vinyl veneer on it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

307 posts in 1618 days


#4 posted 03-22-2019 09:35 PM

Lauan was my first thought also. But you never know. I never saw it anywhere else but on the back of thin plywood.
Where did you get that board?

-- James E McIntyre

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1363 posts in 3175 days


#5 posted 03-22-2019 09:50 PM

Luan or what I’ve heard called Monkey Pod I wound up with a slab of it from a table top I salvaged from a lower end table that was dumped. Tried to use a piece for shelf top I was making for something for my wife’s school and it was a mother trucker to stain evenly. Still have a chunk of it left will likely only go for a shop project of some sort

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View pottz's profile

pottz

4671 posts in 1310 days


#6 posted 03-22-2019 10:42 PM

LUAN

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3221 posts in 1713 days


#7 posted 03-23-2019 02:58 AM

If it is not a plywood, monkeypod is also a possibility.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1258 posts in 1235 days


#8 posted 03-23-2019 03:30 AM

Yellow Meranti a.k.a. Lauan, Philippine Mahogany.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View mel52's profile

mel52

767 posts in 591 days


#9 posted 03-23-2019 04:26 AM

Looks a tad like Mahogany of some type.

-- MEL, Kansas

View AudibleVelvet's profile

AudibleVelvet

22 posts in 1013 days


#10 posted 03-23-2019 04:32 PM



Lauan was my first thought also. But you never know. I never saw it anywhere else but on the back of thin plywood.
Where did you get that board?

- James E McIntyre


It was part of a tabletop. Thin particle board surrounded by this stuff. I’m just going to use it for a leg on a bench for my sander and drill press. It works super easy.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5323 posts in 2677 days


#11 posted 03-23-2019 06:46 PM

Luan.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

307 posts in 1618 days


#12 posted 03-25-2019 05:29 PM


Lauan was my first thought also. But you never know. I never saw it anywhere else but on the back of thin plywood.
Where did you get that board?

- James E McIntyre

It was part of a tabletop. Thin particle board surrounded by this stuff. I m just going to use it for a leg on a bench for my sander and drill press. It works super easy.

- AudibleVelvet


I hope you not putting to much weight on it. Lauan is something you should not monkey pod around with.

-- James E McIntyre

View AlaskaGuy's profile (online now)

AlaskaGuy

5184 posts in 2635 days


#13 posted 03-25-2019 05:35 PM

I hope you not putting to much weight on it. Lauan is something you should not monkey pod around with.

- James E McIntyre

What does that mean?

The bottom of this page show the strengths of different Mahoganies. Luan does excellent in compression strength.

Compressive strength tells you how much of a load a wood species can withstand parallel to the grain. How much weight will the legs of a table support before they buckle?

http://workshopcompanion.com/KnowHow/Design/Nature_of_Wood/3_Wood_Strength/3_Wood_Strength.htm

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

307 posts in 1618 days


#14 posted 03-25-2019 09:52 PM


I hope you not putting to much weight on it. Lauan is something you should not monkey pod around with.

- James E McIntyre
What does that mean?

The bottom of this page show the strengths of different Mahoganies. Luan does excellent in compression strength.

Compressive strength tells you how much of a load a wood species can withstand parallel to the grain. How much weight will the legs of a table support before they buckle?

http://workshopcompanion.com/KnowHow/Design/Nature_of_Wood/3_Wood_Strength/3_Wood_Strength.htm

- AlaskaGuy

Lauan isn’t mahogany. Or at least true mahogany. It would probably work for legs on load bearing tables. To an extent. Not my first choice for a drill press table.
I would use it for fire wood.

-- James E McIntyre

View Richard's profile

Richard

11274 posts in 3359 days


#15 posted 03-25-2019 10:07 PM


Yellow Meranti a.k.a. Lauan, Philippine Mahogany.

- Ripper70

Even though the Link won’t work for me, I agree with the diagnosis!

OOPS! It’s doing something?

”The wood name Philippine Mahogany is a loose term that applies to a number of wood species coming from southeast Asia. Another common name for this wood is Meranti: while yet another name that is commonly used when referring to plywood made of this type of wood is Lauan. (And even though it’s called Philippine Mahogany, it bears no relation to what is considered to be “true” mahogany in the Swietenia and Khaya genera.”

OKAY! Thank You!

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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