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EWT parting tool

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Forum topic by j1440 posted 03-22-2019 02:13 AM 460 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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j1440

5 posts in 46 days


03-22-2019 02:13 AM

I am considering buying a EWT carbide parting tool
Some of the reviews on Amazon claim the carbide tip pops out easy & won’t stay in—-others love it.
I wonder if those complaining are forcing it in.
Have any of you had problems with this?
Are any other carbide parting tools better?
Thanks

-- Jim, Kingman, Az


16 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2589 posts in 2461 days


#1 posted 03-22-2019 10:03 AM

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1503 posts in 2057 days


#2 posted 03-22-2019 11:35 AM

I don’t have a parting tool anymore. I don’t think they are a necessary tool if you’re doing bowls, platters, plates and hollow forms. If you are doing spindles only, I suppose you would need one.

As far as the carbide falling out of the EWT tool, it’s more than likely to be caused by the operator. Those inserts have been in use in machine shops for years. If they kept falling out, they would have gone extinct. .......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View RichBolduc's profile

RichBolduc

849 posts in 443 days


#3 posted 03-22-2019 01:04 PM

I have one and yeah i’ve had to replace the insert multiple times because it flies out.

Rich

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5621 posts in 3990 days


#4 posted 03-22-2019 02:52 PM

I’m with Wildwood Bill on this one … don’t see any benefit in this tool.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8920 posts in 1465 days


#5 posted 03-22-2019 03:26 PM

HSS parting tools are simple to sharpen. Just an intersection of two flat faces. I don’t see any advantage to a carbide inserted parting tool for woodturning. If the inserts are coming out, it’s because the user isn’t applying force perpendicular to the axis of rotation and/or not cutting on the center-line to the axis. Carbide parting tools have small clamp areas and low clamping forces by design – you want a small kerf to minimize material loss. If the cutting edge is not making first contact at the appropriate angle of approach, there will be a resulting force wanting to pull the insert out. If any side loading is taking place because the tool is not perpendicular to the axis it will tend to twist the fingers of the tool an allow the insert to fall out. I have seen these inserts come out of tooling on metal lathes as well and it is always because the tool was not set properly. Every time.

I have carbide turning tools and I like them. But the adoption of metal lathe cutoff tools for woodturning is completely unnecessary and introduces issues of frustration due to the nature of how the tools are designed to cut and how different the two types of lathes operate.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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lew

12660 posts in 4082 days


#6 posted 03-22-2019 08:25 PM

I have it and it has never come out while using it. I did have it fall out once after turning a while but I think I might not have had it seated properly. Just as a precaution, I now bump the tip on a piece of wood after using it, just to make sure it is seated. No problems since.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

416 posts in 1405 days


#7 posted 03-22-2019 10:47 PM

My go to parting tool is a used recip. saw blade in a handle and sharpened as often as necessary. It cuts a 1/32” groove, doesn’t get as hot as a wider blade and won’t pop out like EWT’s. I use conventional 1/8 and 3/16 wide parting tools for thin grooves and starting tenons and sockets.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7301 posts in 2526 days


#8 posted 03-22-2019 11:49 PM

My go to parting tool is a used recip. saw blade in a handle and sharpened as often as necessary.
- Jack Lewis

Thats a brilliant idea… but I curious as to how you have it mounted in the handle… since those blades cut on the pull stroke, do you have to turn it around the opposite way to get it to cut correctly?

I rarely use a parting tool, so can’t imagine ever spending that kind of money for one of those EMT ones… my ground down screwdriver works just fine for the rare occasions I need a parting tool, and it didn’t cost me anything :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5621 posts in 3990 days


#9 posted 03-23-2019 12:37 AM

Thats a brilliant idea… but I curious as to how you have it mounted in the handle… since those blades cut on the pull stroke, do you have to turn it around the opposite way to get it to cut correctly?

I know guys that have done this … they grind the teeth off.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View PCDub's profile

PCDub

127 posts in 571 days


#10 posted 03-23-2019 01:33 AM


Thats a brilliant idea… but I curious as to how you have it mounted in the handle… since those blades cut on the pull stroke, do you have to turn it around the opposite way to get it to cut correctly?

I know guys that have done this … they grind the teeth off.

- TheDane

Yep, that’s what I did, and mounted it in a handle

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

657 posts in 1628 days


#11 posted 03-23-2019 02:19 AM

Other than cost my biggest concern would be (per the specs) that it will cut up to 4” diameter or 2” deep.
That is not very far with a lot of turnings when using it around the live center or spur/chuck with bowls, platters, hollow forms, etc. Probably OK length for spindles.
I still use one from the 80’s and it probably only 2” shorter. Only takes a few seconds to give it a few strokes on a diamond plate to keep it super sharp.
Hurricane is about $30 including shipping or the Packard above for not a lot more $ but better quality. You can get a standard diamond and a thin and have $$$ left over.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1856 posts in 930 days


#12 posted 03-23-2019 02:53 AM

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3222 posts in 1714 days


#13 posted 03-23-2019 04:10 AM

I cannot find it now but a while back I saw a guy cut up an old table saw blade to make a carbide parting tool. If memory serves, he basically cut a strip so that one carbide tooth was at an appropriate angle and made a handle similar to how you would make a knife. You can often find old saw blades at a garage sale for a buck or two. Or just use your own when you retire an old blade.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2589 posts in 2461 days


#14 posted 03-23-2019 10:55 AM

If get just one parting tool recommend a diamond parting tool and it’s true don’t have to spend a lot of money for one. My first one was a Sorby diamond parting tool and didn’t cost what they are asking for it today from Craft Supplies.

https://www.pennstateind.com/store/LX430.html

https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/search?term=sorby+diamond+parting+tool

High Speed Steel parting tool will serve you well regardless of the brand or price. Big reason for recommending a diamond parting tool, “less likely to bind in the cut.” Have used my parting tools for bowl, hollow forms, pen, and spindle turning. Like already posted easiest turning tool to sharpen whether using diamond card by hand or on a grinder.

-- Bill

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

416 posts in 1405 days


#15 posted 03-23-2019 05:38 PM



My go to parting tool is a used recip. saw blade in a handle and sharpened as often as necessary.
- Jack Lewis

Thats a brilliant idea… but I curious as to how you have it mounted in the handle… since those blades cut on the pull stroke, do you have to turn it around the opposite way to get it to cut correctly?

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

I don’t use it as a saw blade. Mounted it in homemade handle, bandsaw slit the end and a brass ferrule swedged on to crimp blade into the handle. I ground off the teeth in self protection and ground a wedge shape point to cut like a regular parting tool. Bigger grind on top of blade point like this >.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

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