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Forum topic by Kurch posted 03-22-2019 01:05 AM 499 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kurch

2 posts in 65 days


03-22-2019 01:05 AM

Hello,

I am a new member of the forum.

I am a beginner-intermediate woodworker and would appreciate some advice on how to tackle a project. I would like to build the under stairs storage unit shown in the below link. I found this picture in an old (Feb 2011) issue of Family Handyman but there were no plans – just the picture.

My two questions are:
1. what type of wood would you suggest?

2. how should I join the shelves that are angled?

Thank you kindly

http://cdn-origin.tmbi.com/TFH/tips-app/630x630/FH11FEB_STRAGE_21.jpg


11 replies so far

View marc_rosen's profile

marc_rosen

155 posts in 3545 days


#1 posted 03-22-2019 01:42 AM

Hello Kurch,
I built something similar to this for my Sister-in-Law two years ago for the same reason; under the stairs storage. I had no plans, just the dimensions and “designed” it myself. I chose not to have a slanted top board as in your picture, instead I stepped off that side and used floating tenons to attach all boards. Dowels work just as well.
My S-I-L uses the stepped areas for knick -knacks and other small objects. Instead of milling the lumber for her I purchased a few pieces of Southern Yellow Pine stair tread and cut it to the lengths needed. (The tread came in 10 foot lengths and had the bull nose on its leading edge so I had no machining to do other than cutting)
I know that does not answer your question directly but I did not have to make any angled cuts and the tenons (or dowels, if used) allowed for convenient dry assembly to make certain all pieces fit nicely.
Hope that helps, Marc

-- Windsurfing, Woodworking, Weaving, and Woodducks. "Most woodworkers are usually boring holes"

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

250 posts in 823 days


#2 posted 03-22-2019 01:49 AM

Poplar is an attractive hardwood. This is probably made out of plywood. It looks like it is about 16” wide so if you used solid wood you will have to join the boards. If it is plywood you can select any type of wood that gives you the look you want. For the joints I would probably go with dowels if it were mine. The reason I am leaning to dowels is with the angle of the one side screws would have to be recessed to the point they would be bearing on very little wood. Dowels would be cut/sanded to the same angle and after gluing they would be very strong.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View Steve's profile

Steve

1225 posts in 946 days


#3 posted 03-22-2019 01:52 AM

I would build it with 3/4” plywood and pocket hole screws

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

250 posts in 823 days


#4 posted 03-22-2019 01:59 AM



I would build it with 3/4” plywood with pocket hole screws

- Steve

Yes pocket screws would be good. If you used pocket screws (which I use a lot) on the angled joint would the screw be on top (small angle) or bottom (large angle)? I guess you would have to adjust your length if on the bottom so it didn’t go out the side.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View SMP's profile

SMP

877 posts in 269 days


#5 posted 03-22-2019 04:29 AM

Welcome! It kind of depends on wood you have and what you are comfortble with. I would build it out of 3/4 plywood as mentioned. Personally for the straight shelves I would dado into the sides and screw threw(i use those countersink bits that have a drill bit on one side and screwdriver bit on other side speeds it up) For those angled corners i would cut a “cleat” out of pine or poplar whatever i have laying around on the table saw til i get the ngle close enough and cut to length(with of the unit)that I can screw into from different sides and angles. Good wood glue like titebond II and screws will hold that all together

View marc_rosen's profile

marc_rosen

155 posts in 3545 days


#6 posted 03-22-2019 11:16 AM

Hi again Kurch,
Here is a picture of the shelf. Also unlike your picture is the depth of my shelf. You could do this same approach with plywood as others have suggested and to minimize sagging shelves just brace them as depicted in your picture. (What is not shown are removable braces for the wider, lower shelves to stop sag. ) Are having wheels important to you? You may not need to move it at all, so consider that before you buy your materials. Marc

-- Windsurfing, Woodworking, Weaving, and Woodducks. "Most woodworkers are usually boring holes"

View Steve's profile

Steve

1225 posts in 946 days


#7 posted 03-22-2019 12:34 PM


I would build it with 3/4” plywood with pocket hole screws

- Steve

Yes pocket screws would be good. If you used pocket screws (which I use a lot) on the angled joint would the screw be on top (small angle) or bottom (large angle)? I guess you would have to adjust your length if on the bottom so it didn t go out the side.

- MikeDilday

I would probably screw from the outside on those two angled pieces. Screws and glue would probably do it. Unless he’s putting a ton of weight on the shelves.

I had also thought about a cleat underneath as SMP mentioned also.

View Kurch's profile

Kurch

2 posts in 65 days


#8 posted 04-03-2019 09:17 PM

Wow!

Thank you guys for taking the time to respond. I am finding these responses very helpful. I will probably “steal” a few ideas from several of the replies.

I appreciate the expertise in the sforum.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

834 posts in 1474 days


#9 posted 04-04-2019 07:37 AM

If your building it out of descent sort of plywood , I,d face nail it from the top of your slanted board horizontally into the horizontal shelves. Nails and wood glue, The slanted top will never see any load. Your gonna have to be good to get your initial nails right though, maybe pre drill the first couple of nails until you’ve got it all set.

If your not confident with that , go with marc-rosens idea above, you don,t loose any shelf space with his idea.

Regards
Anthm

View Robert's profile

Robert

3374 posts in 1845 days


#10 posted 04-04-2019 01:16 PM

When I use plywood for shelves, I attach a 1” wide strip of hardwood to the front edge for strength and aesthetics.

Personally, I think Marc’s idea is the way to go. Not only easier to build, but I think it looks better, too.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7475 posts in 3732 days


#11 posted 04-04-2019 09:50 PM

Are you going to paint or stain?
If you are going to paint I suggest using MDO as it is perfect for painting and the surfaces are tougher than the wood core!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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