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Walnut Stump advice

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Forum topic by Mcpowell posted 03-20-2019 03:40 PM 512 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mcpowell

55 posts in 1217 days


03-20-2019 03:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut walnut stump stump stump table

I’m slowly digging this stump out and plan to move it to my house, where my greedy hands will then pressure wash and store it until I can make something cool out of it.

Any advice on storing?

How long will it take this to air dry? I don’t want to cut it in to small bits, I’d prefer to keep it whole and make an artsy table, etc.

By the way, this is not an easy job. This stump is 75 yards into the woods, no power, no electricity, so I’ll be wenching it through some woods to get it to a place where I can load it on a trailer.

-- I want to be good


18 replies so far

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Snipes

392 posts in 2572 days


#1 posted 03-20-2019 03:45 PM


How long will it take this to air dry?

- Mcpowell


122 yrs

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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Mcpowell

55 posts in 1217 days


#2 posted 03-20-2019 04:24 PM

122 yrs

- Snipes

That’s a little longer than I planned.

-- I want to be good

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Toasty

11 posts in 42 days


#3 posted 03-20-2019 04:38 PM

Wow! I am envious, and not envious. That is a lot of work. After you get it out of the ground, I would anchor seal any cut ends, and store it in the shade/barn. I have not processed a stump before, but have done it with some logs for turning. Anchor seal is amazing, if done right away, you won’s see checking for months left outside, in the round. Since I haven’t processed a stump before, I am not sure what the pith is like in a stump. I would cut out the pith, or at least get close to it to relieve some stress. Again, anchor seal at least the end grain.

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HackFabrication

99 posts in 39 days


#4 posted 03-20-2019 07:06 PM

...so I’ll be wenching it through some woods…

When you’re done with the wench, send her to my table, I’m getting thirsty….

Just Kidding (about the wench, not about being thirsty).

That sort of manual labor has lost it’s appeal to me many, many years ago.

Probably take a number of years to get that hunk of wood dried out to the point you can do something with it. You might hasten the drying by ‘chunking’ it out some and sealing the end grain.

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

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Steve

1175 posts in 910 days


#5 posted 03-20-2019 07:24 PM

What kind of table are you looking to make with it?

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Mcpowell

55 posts in 1217 days


#6 posted 03-20-2019 07:38 PM



What kind of table are you looking to make with it?

- Steve

I am up for ideas. I figure I have a lot of time to decide, but something like a large coffee table or even some sort of table that sits at the end of a sofa, or in a hallway.

I liked these that I found on the www.

-- I want to be good

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LesB

2047 posts in 3770 days


#7 posted 03-20-2019 07:43 PM

I think you will have better results if you cut it in to slabs and then let them dry. Chances are even if you pressure wash it there will be some rocks or at least pockets of soil in there that will dull your chain saw so be ready for that. If you slab it where it is located you can save the wenches back…...

Do you know what type of walnut is it?

-- Les B, Oregon

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Steve

1175 posts in 910 days


#8 posted 03-20-2019 07:47 PM



I think you will have better results if you cut it in to slabs and then let them dry. Chances are even if you pressure wash it there will be some rocks or at least pockets of soil in there that will dull your chain saw so be ready for that. If you slab it where it is located you can save the wenches back…...

Do you know what type of walnut is it?

- LesB

Not knowing what type of table you wanted to build, I was going to recommend getting it slabbed up awhile too. You could also try and find someone with a kiln that would let you stick it in there.

I’d guess quite a few years for that thing to dry out in it’s current shape.

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Mcpowell

55 posts in 1217 days


#9 posted 03-20-2019 07:50 PM



I think you will have better results if you cut it in to slabs and then let them dry. Chances are even if you pressure wash it there will be some rocks or at least pockets of soil in there that will dull your chain saw so be ready for that. If you slab it where it is located you can save the wenches back…...

Do you know what type of walnut is it?

- LesB

Since the “wench” is me (not looking like Hack’s wench, as in bald guy with a gray beard) I’m not trying to save my back. I’ll take my time and use my come-along, and save my back hopefully. I’m feeling pretty devoted to getting it out in one piece. And if I burn through a few chain saw blades, it is expected.

I don’t know the type of walnut tree. It’s in northeast GA, and I can post a picture of the table made with the wood. Or I can take a picture of a neighboring tree that is still standing (no leaves on it at this point). Can it be identified by the bark only?

-- I want to be good

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Snipes

392 posts in 2572 days


#10 posted 03-20-2019 09:16 PM

You can build something with it right now. Just won’t be dry. I’ve built plenty of stump side tables that weren’t dry

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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OSU55

2206 posts in 2317 days


#11 posted 03-20-2019 09:22 PM



You can build something with it right now. Just won t be dry. I ve built plenty of stump side tables that weren t dry

- Snipes


Did you use any finish, seal ends, etc or just leave alone to dry out?

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mel52

768 posts in 592 days


#12 posted 03-21-2019 03:13 AM

There is nothing you can’t move with the proper amount of explosives, and if you are lucky it might even reach the road. LOL. Good luck on getting it out, looks to be a good chunk. Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

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Snipes

392 posts in 2572 days


#13 posted 03-21-2019 03:23 AM

Osu, on most I used pure tongue oil and tried to slow drying. Some linseed oil. Moisture will build on the bottom side, so either shim up or flip once in a while.

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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tomd

2202 posts in 4098 days


#14 posted 03-21-2019 04:03 AM

Build your table now and then let it dry but be ready for some movement and cracks or you might just get lucky.

-- Tom D

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Mcpowell

55 posts in 1217 days


#15 posted 03-24-2019 09:22 PM

Just updating y’all on the stump status….

I think I’m going to have it milled vertically, so I could possibly have the option of 2 tables. The tap root has a fork in it that you can’t see in this picture, but the other half is about the same size as what you see here. It’s a little over 4 feet wide at it’s widest point (from cut to cut).

-- I want to be good

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