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Forum topic by wkndwrnch posted 03-15-2019 10:12 AM 390 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wkndwrnch

66 posts in 2666 days


03-15-2019 10:12 AM

I am ready to attach walnut table top to farm house table legs. Table top is 40×60” with draw leaves.I want to allow for wood movement in the top. I like the figure 8 fasteners,but I am not sure how many to use on a top like this. Should I use the figure 8’s on the 40 inch ends and not on the 60 inch length of the top? Thank you for your advice.


29 replies so far

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CWWoodworking

306 posts in 476 days


#1 posted 03-15-2019 10:36 AM

I use these. Biscuit slot cut at 1/2 inch. 4-5 on the ends, 6-7 on the sides. Works well.

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BlueRidgeDog

278 posts in 76 days


#2 posted 03-15-2019 10:38 AM

How does the grain run? It is not too clear from your description. Leaves imply it runs on the 40” direction, so the table will get longer and shorter in the 60” direction with seasonal movement. I attach them to the casework portion (leg support portion in your case) at a point that perpendicular to the grain, so that as the grain expands and contracts the washer slides left and right. If your grain runs on the 40” side, then that means you are going to attach them to the 60” side.

As to how many, I put one every 8” to 12” if I think somebody will try and move the piece by grasping the top. Less if it is not likely.

For tables, most of the time I have seen a slot and cleat method (or zclip mentioned in CWWodworking’s reply) so you can put some along the long grain side and by putting the tongue half way in the slot the cleat can move in and out of the slot. I can dig up some images, but I bet you have found examples in your research.

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wkndwrnch

66 posts in 2666 days


#3 posted 03-15-2019 12:22 PM



How does the grain run? It is not too clear from your description. Leaves imply it runs on the 40” direction, so the table will get longer and shorter in the 60” direction with seasonal movement. I attach them to the casework portion (leg support portion in your case) at a point that perpendicular to the grain, so that as the grain expands and contracts the washer slides left and right. If your grain runs on the 40” side, then that means you are going to attach them to the 60” side.

As to how many, I put one every 8” to 12” if I think somebody will try and move the piece by grasping the top. Less if it is not likely.

You are correct,I could see the picture in my head of how the grain runs, but neglected to share that information along with my question. The grain runs the 60” length. The grain on the draw leaves runs perpendicular to the table top.

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wkndwrnch

66 posts in 2666 days


#4 posted 03-15-2019 12:27 PM

</blockquote

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BlueRidgeDog

278 posts in 76 days


#5 posted 03-15-2019 12:42 PM

Then I would use the washers or zcllps/cleats along the 40” side, with a few cleats or zclips (not washers) spaced on the 60” side, but installed to they can move in and out. I don’t know where you are, but right now in the US it is the end of winder and “indoor” work is about as dry as it will get, so if I were putting a top on today, I would position the clip on the long grain side with ample room to move into the slot (out from the center of the table) as the wood is as contracted as it will get. If you are in the southern hemisphere, the opposite applies.

That said, if the top and bottom side are finished the same and you keep it in an air conditioned house, you will see much movement.

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SMP

449 posts in 202 days


#6 posted 03-15-2019 03:44 PM

Good advice already given. I use those same clips showm. One thing though, in case you don’t have a biscuit joiner, what I usually do is run the inside of the aprons on the table saw set to about 1/2” depth and spaced to match the bend.

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Woodknack

12634 posts in 2677 days


#7 posted 03-15-2019 07:42 PM

If you use figure 8 they can be put all around the perimeter.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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CWWoodworking

306 posts in 476 days


#8 posted 03-15-2019 07:46 PM



If you use figure 8 they can be put all around the perimeter.

- Woodknack

Not really. They do not allow any movement if put on long grain side.

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Woodknack

12634 posts in 2677 days


#9 posted 03-18-2019 01:08 AM


If you use figure 8 they can be put all around the perimeter.

- Woodknack

Not really. They do not allow any movement if put on long grain side.

- CWWoodworking


That’s exactly what they do, allow movement on all sides by pivoting. You’re supposed to put them on at an angle so when the wood moves, the figure 8 turns. That and ease of installation is why I prefer them.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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CWWoodworking

306 posts in 476 days


#10 posted 03-18-2019 01:14 AM

40” table has the possibility to move quite a bit. More than a 8 would allow. It could put quite a bit stress on the skirt. The screw isn’t that far from the edge.

IMO, it’s a poor choice for a dining table.

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Woodknack

12634 posts in 2677 days


#11 posted 03-18-2019 01:24 AM



IMO, it’s a poor choice for a dining table.

- CWWoodworking

I’m not giving you an opinion, they will work based on experience.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Rich

4149 posts in 886 days


#12 posted 03-18-2019 01:27 AM

Let’s check the score:

Rick M. with 49 blog posts and 56 projects, including a dining room table (beautiful I might add).
CW with 0 blog posts and 0 projects, but has an opinion.

My money is on Rick M. He’s right, if you put them at an angle, they pivot.

That said, I’d use Z-clips…LOL I just like them and they’re cheaper than figure 8s. I can dial in my biscuit joiner and cut the slots in a couple of minutes, versus pulling out my forstner bits and countersinking.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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WoodenDreams

505 posts in 208 days


#13 posted 03-18-2019 03:20 AM

Both figure 8 and Z-clips will work. I prefer the Z-clips. It’s a mater of personal preference.

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Aj2

2054 posts in 2095 days


#14 posted 03-18-2019 03:43 AM

I also like figure 8s. My only gripe is that they take 2 screws and I’ve found sometimes one of the screws will loosen up.
I have yet to figure out why any suggestions are welcome.
I apologize in advance if my post takes away from the Op

-- Aj

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BlueRidgeDog

278 posts in 76 days


#15 posted 03-18-2019 03:32 PM

The point that you can put figure 8 washers on the long grain side, but at an angle is a good one.

I would recommend that the OP not overthink it, attach the top, put it on in a way that the boards can expand cross grain and move on to the next project.

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