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Finishing 1/4 sawn white oak

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Forum topic by AWood posted 03-13-2019 06:44 PM 299 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AWood

52 posts in 4046 days


03-13-2019 06:44 PM

I am building a mess of 1/4 oak furniture. I was thinking of fuming the pieces in the traditional method of ammonia vapour (well explained on the net) However I have seen a couple of products describing finishes similar to the method of vapour fuming. Specifically a product called Odie’s Dark and another Rubio Monocoat called FMC Fumed. Has anyone used the products and what results did they get?

Would appreciate any insight!

-- AllWood


9 replies so far

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CWWoodworking

319 posts in 479 days


#1 posted 03-13-2019 07:21 PM

I played around with Rubio once. It wasn’t mind blowing but a little different look than your standard stain.

Personally, I would stick to my standard stain/laquer routine before trying something like Rubio again. It’s incredibly expensive for not that different of look.

White oak is a beautiful wood and doesn’t need much fuss.

Be careful if you decide to do the fuming.

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SMP

477 posts in 206 days


#2 posted 03-14-2019 01:13 AM

I did a ton of research on this, and tried various methods. Fuming alone is unpredictable with commonly available ammonia, so best to use dyes in conjunction. This is the best method i have found so far.
https://www.wwgoa.com/article/an-authentic-arts-and-crafts-finish/

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BlueRidgeDog

304 posts in 79 days


#3 posted 03-14-2019 01:42 AM

I looked at fuming and could get the industrial ammonia, but building a chamber and then the fuss just turned me off. I use a simple minwax pecan stain then hardwax oil. Not a replica for a traditional finish, but one I like and one that will age into the ideal look for me. I do like the rays to stand out a bit more.

I have three fumed pieces (antiques) and my work is not freakish next to them.

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CWWoodworking

319 posts in 479 days


#4 posted 03-14-2019 01:47 AM

Blue, I actually like your pieces better(a lot)than the Rubio. In my limited use, it had too much green for my taste.

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Robert

3316 posts in 1781 days


#5 posted 03-14-2019 07:05 PM

For popping the grain, I’ve had my best luck using dyes.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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pintodeluxe

5883 posts in 3113 days


#6 posted 03-15-2019 02:31 AM

You can do so many good things with white oak finishes. My easiest recipe is Rodda #19 Fruitwood oil based stain. Cabot, Varathane, and General Finishes have similar medium bodied oil stains that work great.

I’ve also done quite a bit of furniture with a stain-over-dye technique pioneered by Jeff Jewitt. It’s a lot more work. A LOT MORE. The look is rewarding if you’re using highly figured stock. You can get an instant antique look. My favorite combo is Transtint Golden Brown dye, followed by a seal coat of shellac. Then comes the General Finishes Antique Walnut gel stain, and finally a sprayed lacquer top coat. If you decide to try it, I have a Limbert bookcase article in the current Fine Woodworking magazine FWW #274 where I used this recipe. The article describes the process.
Good luck and have fun!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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SMP

477 posts in 206 days


#7 posted 03-15-2019 03:31 AM



Blue, I actually like your pieces better(a lot)than the Rubio. In my limited use, it had too much green for my taste.

- CWWoodworking

The first time I fumed QSWO i was surprised how green it got. I thought I messed up the process But then as I researched more found it was normal, hence the dyes etc. Though I also found that fuming and just a garnet shellac over really gets rid of te green and makes a nice warm brown.

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SMP

477 posts in 206 days


#8 posted 03-15-2019 05:58 AM

I took a couple pics of some samples i did to test for my next project. Cut this piece off, stuck it in tupperware with cheap home depot ammonia that is really low % for 3 days. Came out greenish. Put a single coat of garnet shellac and you can see the result here.

Here is the back side, instead of shellac, i sanded off the green. It still has a slight greenish tint compared to the other side i shellaced:

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BlueRidgeDog

304 posts in 79 days


#9 posted 03-15-2019 10:43 AM

If I did not have a kid in the house (and don’t get me started on why at my age I still have a kid in the house!) and a dog, I would probably fume. As it is I like the simplicity of low VOC working conditions.

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