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How to set up my 45 lock miter bit

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Forum topic by jasonallen posted 03-13-2019 02:01 PM 593 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jasonallen

202 posts in 2036 days


03-13-2019 02:01 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip router joining shaping

I got this new router bit for making 90 degree joints. It didn’t come with instructions. Its called a 45 degree lock miter bit. Anyway, I have it set up on my router table but I really don’t know how to set the height of the bit and depth of the fence. I can get it pretty close but just not quite right. If anyone has any ideas that would be great.

-- Skill and confidence are an unconquered army.


19 replies so far

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1415 posts in 3265 days


#1 posted 03-13-2019 02:14 PM

It is a VERY difficult bit to get set and you’ll need to have some critical layout for the center of the stock and the positions of your bit. Infinity sells a jig for theirs and you can see the set up video here. Very key to also use a secondary board on top of the one your’re cutting so the edge does not run into the bit and stays on the fence. I just ran mine two weeks ago and had to go back to the video to make sure I had it right. Be sure to mill a few extra pieces of stock too, because the test pieces are also going to be needed.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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pottz

5517 posts in 1400 days


#2 posted 03-13-2019 02:38 PM

yeah i have the infinity bit and i got the set up jig to go with it but you can make your own,just have to play with it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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Rich

4541 posts in 1005 days


#3 posted 03-13-2019 03:58 PM

On the contrary, it is VERY easy to set up if you realize that there are two settings and that you can adjust them separately. Not only that, but once you’ve set the bit up once, by taking a couple of simple measurements, you can set it up first try on any other board thickness. No test cut required.

Here is a blog post I wrote on this topic: https://www.lumberjocks.com/RichTaylor/blog/111009

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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PPK

1430 posts in 1225 days


#4 posted 03-13-2019 06:56 PM



yeah i have the infinity bit and i got the set up jig to go with it but you can make your own,just have to play with it.

- pottz

I’ve got the el-cheapo Yonico brand bit. But yes, once you’ve got it set up, just keep a couple scrap cut-offs, and you’ll have a nice guide to set up quickly next time.

-- Pete

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jasonallen

202 posts in 2036 days


#5 posted 03-13-2019 08:55 PM



On the contrary, it is VERY easy to set up if you realize that there are two settings and that you can adjust them separately. Not only that, but once you ve set the bit up once, by taking a couple of simple measurements, you can set it up first try on any other board thickness. No test cut required.

Here is a blog post I wrote on this topic: https://www.lumberjocks.com/RichTaylor/blog/111009

- Rich

Thank you for that great explanation. Now, if only I had a depth measuring tool as good as yours! I got mine set pretty well today by trial and error. Only to find out my Porter Cable router will gradually settle no matter how tight I get it. That was very frustrating. I see endless uses for this bit, but currently I’m using it to make 2×2 legs 24 inches long. That’s 192 inches of cutting for 1 leg. The router settled enough that the 1st joint and the last joint definitely don’t work. The only perfect joint was the first one. I don’t have a router table, I use a home made one. Especially after today I’m considering buying a router table and different router, any suggestions would be appreciated.

-- Skill and confidence are an unconquered army.

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Rich

4541 posts in 1005 days


#6 posted 03-13-2019 11:22 PM


Thank you for that great explanation. Now, if only I had a depth measuring tool as good as yours!

- jasonallen

The important thing to take away from my blog post is to set the bit height and fence as two separate operations using the two test cuts for each as described. The height gauge makes the process a little simpler, and allows you to come up with the formula for other board thicknesses, but isn’t mandatory for getting the bit set up.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View DS's profile

DS

3184 posts in 2836 days


#7 posted 03-13-2019 11:32 PM

Perhaps my biggest woodworking failure is trying to set up a lock miter bit.
I’m sure I could do it, but not sure if I will run out of patience again like last time.

Sometimes other alternatives come up whilst wallowing in the depths of frustration that renders the current endeavor moot.
heheh
Best of luck to YOU tho’
:-D

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View MPython's profile

MPython

134 posts in 227 days


#8 posted 03-14-2019 01:29 AM

I’m with Rich on this. Lock miter bits are fiddly to set up, but not impossible by a long shot. Be patient and work with it. Once you get it dialed in, make a set of templates to use the next time you use it. They will get you in the ballpark and the fine adjustments are easy. One tip. If you’re milling plywood, the lock miter bit will destroy the top laminate on cross grain cuts. To avoid this, score the laminate on the cut line with a knife before you run it through the router table.

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

258 posts in 874 days


#9 posted 03-14-2019 03:32 AM

The way I do it is to run two boards on the router on the ends. Then butt the ends of the boards together. If the two boards are even then you are all set. If they are off say 1/16 then raise/lower your router half of that or 1/32. I can usually get it dead on after one test cut and adjustment.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgMRSB0tDxc

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View bgood's profile

bgood

23 posts in 141 days


#10 posted 03-14-2019 03:57 AM

I made a mini sled for my router table. Using a few pieces of material the same thickness as my project material I finally found the correct settings. You can find set-up gages for these bits on the big online supplier. Ultimetaley I make my corners either boxed0(incra) or dovetail(porter-cable) these days.

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Rich

4541 posts in 1005 days


#11 posted 03-14-2019 04:24 AM


The way I do it is to run two boards on the router on the ends. Then butt the ends of the boards together. If the two boards are even then you are all set. If they are off say 1/16 then raise/lower your router half of that or 1/32. I can usually get it dead on after one test cut and adjustment.

- MikeDilday

That’s what I wrote in my blog. The link is posted above. There’s more to it than just running the ends, you have to run the faces to set the fence.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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Rich

4541 posts in 1005 days


#12 posted 03-14-2019 04:27 AM


I made a mini sled for my router table. Using a few pieces of material the same thickness as my project material I finally found the correct settings. You can find set-up gages for these bits on the big online supplier. Ultimetaley I make my corners either boxed0(incra) or dovetail(porter-cable) these days.

- bgood

That works fine if all you use is boards of the same thickness. Read the blog and you’ll see that you can profile a given router bit for any thickness of wood. I put my bit in the router, make two settings based on the board thickness and it’s perfect every time. I don’t even bother with test cuts anymore.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View bgood's profile

bgood

23 posts in 141 days


#13 posted 03-14-2019 05:13 AM

I use dovetails or fingerjoints now for successful joinery i my shop.

I made a mini sled for my router table. Using a few pieces of material the same thickness as my project material I finally found the correct settings. You can find set-up gages for these bits on the big online supplier. Ultimetaley I make my corners either boxed0(incra) or dovetail(porter-cable) these days.

- bgood

That works fine if all you use is boards of the same thickness. Read the blog and you ll see that you can profile a given router bit for any thickness of wood. I put my bit in the router, make two settings based on the board thickness and it s perfect every time. I don t even bother with test cuts anymore.

- Rich


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Rich

4541 posts in 1005 days


#14 posted 03-14-2019 05:21 AM


I use dovetails or fingerjoints now for successful joinery i my shop.

- bgood

Which has nothing to do with the subject of this thread. Dovetails and box joints are fine, but for a strong miter joint with just a clean corner, nothing beats a lock miter. As I said, setup blocks only work for boards of a particular thickness. The blog post explains how to profile the bit for any thickness of board that’s within the limits of the bit.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View BalsaWood's profile

BalsaWood

154 posts in 1574 days


#15 posted 03-23-2019 08:25 AM

Nice blog post about the lock miter. I’ve been using the bit for a while but when I first got it, it took me quite some time to get it setup properly and make adjustments. The more I used it, the better I got setting it up in future projects.

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