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Burled Maple Slab Headboard Help

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Forum topic by JDB77 posted 03-11-2019 04:33 PM 326 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JDB77

2 posts in 222 days


03-11-2019 04:33 PM

Hello, first question I have asked here so please bare with me. I am making burled maple slab headboard for a queen sized bed. I am using black walnut posts on the end grain of the slab to attach it to the rails. The ends of the slab measure about 16-18” depending on the side. The slab is 2.5” thick. What is the best way to attach the posts to the end grain of the slab to allow for wood movement but also have enough strength. Thank you in advance for the help.


10 replies so far

View LesB's profile

LesB

2203 posts in 3954 days


#1 posted 03-11-2019 05:20 PM

I would go with a mortise and tenon. If you don’t have enough length on the slab to cut tenons consider loose tenons and cut mortises in both the slab and the posts.

Lets see what other people have for ideas.

-- Les B, Oregon

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LittleShaver

586 posts in 1130 days


#2 posted 03-11-2019 05:24 PM

+1 on M&T.

-- Sawdust Maker

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pottz

6371 posts in 1495 days


#3 posted 03-11-2019 05:26 PM



I would go with a mortise and tenon. If you don t have enough length on the slab to cut tenons consider loose tenons and cut mortises in both the slab and the posts.

Lets see what other people have for ideas.

- LesB


+1 id do the same with loose tenons,and not be too concerned about wood movement.that between two hefty walnut posts should look fantastic.make sure to post when done,cant wait to see it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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BFamous

322 posts in 631 days


#4 posted 03-11-2019 07:24 PM

+1 on loose tenons.
Or you could use dowels as pegs if you don’t have an easy way to make the mortises…

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

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Snipes

432 posts in 2755 days


#5 posted 03-11-2019 07:29 PM

I would probably mortise or loose tenon also. But I do think you could use a pocket hole of sorts from backside and use construction lag screws, elongating some of the screw holes for movement. Depending on your skill level

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1097 posts in 3328 days


#6 posted 03-11-2019 07:38 PM

I guess I’m the only one who would build for movement. It might well be OK to just do mortise and tenons and glue it all, but I probably wouldn’t (I live in a climate with pretty wide seasonal humidity swings too). I would do two tenons on each side of the headboard. The top one on each side gets glued, while the bottom one (that goes in an oversized mortise, oversized in its long dimension, but still tight in thickness) does not get glued.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View Tmanpdx's profile

Tmanpdx

26 posts in 222 days


#7 posted 03-11-2019 08:49 PM

Hey, I’ve built slab beds and I would recommend against a M&T solution.

Slabs are going to move a huge amount – in excess of 1/2” depending on size of slab.

I use sliding grooves with threaded inserts with bolts + washers to allow for wood movement – using 2 of these per leg.

The dimensions of the interior groove (which goes all the way through) for the bolt is 1” x 5/16” and the outer groove is 1.5” x 0.75” and is 1/2 deep to hide the bolt head + washer.

The benefit is you can always take them apart for moving.

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JDB77

2 posts in 222 days


#8 posted 03-12-2019 11:16 AM

Thank you all for your help and suggestions. I will probably go with the threaded inserts and bolts in the event that got some reason this needs to come apart at a later time. I will post photos when finished.

View BFamous's profile

BFamous

322 posts in 631 days


#9 posted 03-12-2019 12:04 PM

If you want it easy to take apart in the future, why not just use bed rail hangers? They should be more than strong enough considering they are made to hold up a mattress, box spring, and two people… And it’s just a simple mortise in one side and screws on the other. No exposed hardware and easy connections every time you want to move it.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

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Snipes

432 posts in 2755 days


#10 posted 03-12-2019 12:04 PM

You can build for movement with m&t. Similar to breadboard end glue in one spot, leaving big enough shoulders to hide mortise.

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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