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Forum topic by Beeralchemist posted 03-11-2019 04:32 PM 1085 views 0 times favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Beeralchemist

14 posts in 219 days


03-11-2019 04:32 PM

I didn’t see an introduction area so I guess I’ll jump right in to what I’m doing and why I’m here. I have a 12×20 outbuilding with 8’ walls I’m going to formalize into a tiny shop. I’m looking for advice on how to use that small of space for all the standard wood working tools. I’m pretty sure I’m going with a SawStop pro 36”. Next I have to decide if I can pull off an 8” jointer. I have a Dewalt planer on mobile base, floor standing drill press, and router table that is mobile. The old POS job site table saw is going to the dump. Also need room for a dust collection system (probably HF) and also a 14” bandsaw in the future.

So any thoughts on how folks have put this sort of thing together in such a small space?


33 replies so far

View MPython's profile

MPython

166 posts in 319 days


#1 posted 03-11-2019 04:55 PM

Two suggestions:

1. If you buy the SawStop, buy their router table extension – or another brand – and get rid of your free standing router table.

2. If you’re going to buy an 8” jointer, don’t. Buy a good quality jointer/planer combination instead.

Both of these changes will save you lots of room in your small space. My basement shop is 13’ X 27’. I don’t have room for a stand alone jointer and planer or a stand alone router table. I had an Inca 570 J/P that I used and loved for 25 years. Sold it and bought a Hammer A3-31 12” J/P and have been very happy. I’ve dressed and processes a lot of rough lumber in my small space with those e machines. I’ve also been very happy with my Bench Dog cast iron router table extension on my SawStop. It has done everything I have asked of it and it saves a ton of space. When you start crowding a lot of machines in a small space, the thing you lose is assembly space. If you build small stuff like boxes, that may not be a problem, but if you’re building furniture, it is a BIG problem. If you can combine machine functions and not lose performance, you’re ahead of the game.
My $.02.

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

582 posts in 1126 days


#2 posted 03-11-2019 05:26 PM

Casters.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Beeralchemist's profile

Beeralchemist

14 posts in 219 days


#3 posted 03-12-2019 03:13 AM

Definitely casters.

My router table is setup with INCRA’s LS super system so I’m not too keen to swap that out for a different router system.

I’ve looked a little at the router jointer combos. They seem a bit pricey and have short beds. Probably that won’t be a big issue for most of what I do but when I need it, it certainly would be nice to have. I’m wide open to suggestions here as I’ve only used separate units.

Good thought on thinking about assembly space. I have a habit of forgetting about that whenever I start projects. Going plan is to incorporate that as the table saws outfeed table.

View HackFabrication's profile

HackFabrication

159 posts in 218 days


#4 posted 03-12-2019 12:08 PM

Ditto on casters.

I’m working in my basement, and I’m in the process of putting everything on mobile bases/casters. Even my ‘old and improved’ C’man 10” table saw with Vega Pro40 fence is on a ‘customized’ Shop Fox mobile base:

With outfeed/assembly table folded:

With six swivel casters it will turn on a dime, and a lot easier than dragging it off the wall into the middle of the small area where it can be used.

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

906 posts in 895 days


#5 posted 03-12-2019 12:28 PM

Grizzly has a great shop layout tool – you will need Flash. Take a look here And Fine Woodworking has planner and and article on a 10×20 shop here with some of John Yurko’s thought behind the layout. And here is “THE” small shop from Matthew Teague. He squeezes in a jointer. in

This is the FWW #160 shop Matt created FFW #160

Casters are key and in this design I’d probably not have a fixed outfeed table.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View Beeralchemist's profile

Beeralchemist

14 posts in 219 days


#6 posted 03-12-2019 12:57 PM

I like the collapsing outfeed table. I’ll play with that grizzly layout tool. That should be perfect.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

990 posts in 3300 days


#7 posted 03-12-2019 04:03 PM

Ring around the shop. All machines along the wall on casters, except lathe which is anchored to concrete floor. Upper cabinets on three walls, lighting added under cabinets. Dust collection duct about 3’ high around shop, short piece of flex hose to each machine for rolling out if needed. TS in center of room. I have 16×20 space. Walls are solid tools, but it works for me. Plan on changing it around a few times. And lots of LED shop lights on the ceiling!

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Beeralchemist

14 posts in 219 days


#8 posted 03-14-2019 12:21 PM

Sounds good. Right now I’m digging the trench to get power while trying to find a good sparky. Not going to buy anything until I know what kind of power I’ll have available.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

990 posts in 3300 days


#9 posted 03-14-2019 02:09 PM

100 amp 240 if available, 125 is better. 30 circuts minimum. Put it in conduit, add a couple of extra pipes for tv, internet, and possibly 3 way switches. Don’t know where you are, but the IBEW union hall can give you names of small contractors that are trained and will give you a safe, quality job. Electricity is not for weekend handymen. For safety, put lights on circuts separate from power so a tripped breaker won’t leave you in the dark.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

509 posts in 1095 days


#10 posted 03-14-2019 02:36 PM

You can run a one man shop off a 20a 220v and a 15a 110v line. You’ll not be running more thsn one or two tools and the dust collector at once.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

990 posts in 3300 days


#11 posted 03-14-2019 03:56 PM

Maybe to start, but if doing a new install, go big. Why do it twice? I run a 3 hp shaper or planer, a 2 hp DC, and the 5 HP compressor might kick on. Plus there is also heat and possibly AC, plus lighting. I am a 1 person hobby shop, and one 20 amp 240 v circuit would not cut it. Not everyone has the machines to start, but in the future…..?

View BalsaWood's profile

BalsaWood

157 posts in 1665 days


#12 posted 03-14-2019 04:03 PM

Casters on every machine will make all the difference. You can have a tiny space and still have quite a few large machines.

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WoodenDreams

738 posts in 418 days


#13 posted 03-14-2019 09:43 PM

My 4’x4’ workbench also doubles as a outfeed table for the table saw. My workbench has two under the bench cabinet vises on one side of the bench and one under the bench cabinet vise on the other side. Most of my shop equipment is benchtop equipment, this allows for wood storage shelves under all the benches. Graph paper does help for sketching out you shop equipment, benches, and tool storage placement.

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

259 posts in 966 days


#14 posted 03-14-2019 10:09 PM



Ring around the shop. All machines along the wall on casters, except lathe which is anchored to concrete floor. Upper cabinets on three walls, lighting added under cabinets. Dust collection duct about 3 high around shop, short piece of flex hose to each machine for rolling out if needed. TS in center of room. I have 16×20 space. Walls are solid tools, but it works for me. Plan on changing it around a few times. And lots of LED shop lights on the ceiling!

- ibewjon


Ring around the shop. All machines along the wall on casters, except lathe which is anchored to concrete floor. Upper cabinets on three walls, lighting added under cabinets. Dust collection duct about 3 high around shop, short piece of flex hose to each machine for rolling out if needed. TS in center of room. I have 16×20 space. Walls are solid tools, but it works for me. Plan on changing it around a few times. And lots of LED shop lights on the ceiling!

- ibewjon

Dust collection in ceiling so you don’t loose 4-6” of wall space.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

259 posts in 966 days


#15 posted 03-14-2019 10:10 PM

I have a 12” Jet jointer/planet and love it. Small footprint and a beast.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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